Micrometer "feel" - Page 2
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmailco View Post
    Only thing I'd add is that developing a method of consistent measurement is key, regardless the type of measuring tool.
    Absolutely essential.

    - Leigh

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    Quote Originally Posted by The real Leigh View Post
    Normally you hold a mic in the palm of you right hand with the little finger outside, two fingers through the middle- Leigh
    I was trained decades ago and have since used the little finger to hold onto the frame. I never even considered using another method and in years of using mics in front of hundreds of customers, never once was I corrected. In pantomiming the two positions just now it seems the little finger in the frame allows for more range of motion.
    I'm not trying to be argumentative... just trying to learn something new to me.

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    I'll add a third way of holding a micrometer that's small enough to operate with one hand: Ring finger curled through micrometer frame, middle and little fingers straight, and thumb & index finger turning thimble.

    My thumb and index finger are too short to reach a friction-clutch sleeve comfortably when the micrometer is more than about half-way open, so I end up grabbing the smooth portion of the thimble about half the time. Works fine after developing a consistent "touch".

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    Tight enough to hold a gage block from slipping out under its own weight. Loose enough to move easily between the faces.

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Garner View Post
    I'll add a third way of holding a micrometer that's small enough to operate with one hand: Ring finger curled through micrometer frame, middle and little fingers straight, and thumb & index finger turning thimble.

    My thumb and index finger are too short to reach a friction-clutch sleeve comfortably when the micrometer is more than about half-way open, so I end up grabbing the smooth portion of the thimble about half the time. Works fine after developing a consistent "touch".
    here is a pic of what is described


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    Yeah, there are lots of different ways to hold a mic.

    The technique that I described was in use when I apprenticed 50+ years ago, and I've generally followed it.

    The bottom line is consistency.

    Regardless of what technique you use, you should consistently get readings
    within .0001" (assuming tenth-reading mics) on a gage block.

    If you do, then your technique is working for you, which is all that matters.

    - Leigh

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    Quick update from the OP. Thanks for all the good info in this thread, it really helped me out. What I found with my mics.

    1. Lube, a couple of my mics were definitely dry, a well placed drop of lube greatly improved the sensitivity.

    2. I also found forcing myself to ignore the scale while adjusting the thimble really improved my consistency. I believe my brain was always trying to achieve the correct reading regardless to the amount of pressure on the thimble.

    3. After figuring out #2 it was easy to see which of my mics were consistently off against the standards, and by how much. Slight adjustments were made, now they all read zero against the standards first try consistently. Most importantly, when measuring a unknown dimension now I can trust the result.

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    Jtommr - What you have learned here in the past couple of days has taken some people YEARS to realize. Kudos to you for not being afraid to ask a question, and for taking the information given and applying it successfully. (And also for thanking those that were willing to share!)

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    In aid of avoiding the tendency to 'find' the 'correct' measurement, I use my thumb to turn the thimble, with my thumb over the measurement reading area.

    Can't adjust if you cannot see the lines. Once I have my feel, then I can look at the marks to see if the measurement is consistent.

    The instructor that taught me, taught that the thimble was to be used, and that it was to be three clicks, no more, no less. I can relate to the idea that it is a impact hammer of sorts, and that the thimbles vary from mic to mic, but if it gets the correct measurement each time, and is consistent, then it works.

    Use what works.

    Cheers
    Trev

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    Instead of advice I have a question because I find your post unusual

    How old are these micrometers and do you have a type number for them?

    I'm asking because I've never heard of Mitutoyo micrometers without a ratchet. A picture would be great too

    We can call this professional curiosity.

    Just for the record, normally the measurement pressure for a Mitutoyo (and most others brands) micrometer is given as 5 - 10N in their catalogues.
    The 6 piece set (103-933) was purchased used, and the age is unknown?? Individual model numbers range from 103-113 - 103-118
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 103-113.jpg  

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    Default Mitutoyo micrometers

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    Instead of advice I have a question because I find your post unusual

    How old are these micrometers and do you have a type number for them?

    I'm asking because I've never heard of Mitutoyo micrometers without a ratchet. A picture would be great too

    We can call this professional curiosity.

    Just for the record, normally the measurement pressure for a Mitutoyo (and most others brands) micrometer is given as 5 - 10N in their catalogues.
    According to Mitutoyo's "Product Fundamentals" brochure (page 2), their micrometers are available with a "plain thimble", a "friction thimble", a "ratchet stop", or a "ratchet thimble".

    http://www.mitutoyo.com/pdf/2016_ProductFund.pdf

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    If you are at work why not ask your inspector to check your micrometres, after all what these guys say often goes see if they'll check them for you, then use a slip guage or standard and see if you can get the micrometre to match it.

    However dont look at the thimble as you measure i have been told because you can influence the reading and over tighten it which wont do anything for your feel. And for the correct feel you should just feel pressure under the anvils and then give the workpiece a slight 'wiggle' to ensure you are on the highest point.

    Hope this helps.

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    Gordon....I'm 30...been running a mic for almost 10 years.....my mics have ratchets or thimbles, I hardley use them unless something seems fishy and I have to double check my readings (odd shaped materials) :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by xdmp22 View Post
    Gordon....I'm 30...been running a mic for almost 10 years.....my mics have ratchets or thimbles, I hardley use them unless something seems fishy and I have to double check my readings (odd shaped materials) :-)
    I always, always use the the thimble, and the ratchet for bigger Mics. They aren't there to make you think you have a good measurement they are there to make sure you DON'T over tighten them. Any Mic can be qualified at any time on most realistic diameters or planes.

    But haven't you just proven Gordon's point, by saying you only use them when you are questioning the measurement? That would tell me that when you are un-sure you use them, and when you are confident you don't.

    Robert

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    Quote Originally Posted by litlerob View Post
    snip

    But haven't you just proven Gordon's point, by saying you only use them when you are questioning the measurement? That would tell me that when you are un-sure you use them, and when you are confident you don't.

    Robert
    I just use them as a backup or reassurance.....like when you take a few .020 cuts on a lathe and measure, it takes .020 off each tiime....then you take another and it only takes .018 or takes .021....was it the tool? The mic? The user? The gremlins in the machine?

    Measure once with your "feel" once with the ratchet/thimble...numbers match? Cool...its not the user or the mic....kind of like asking another guy in the shop to double check you....

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    I was meaning using the ratchet as opposed to getting someone else to "feel" the mic....or use theirs.....

    Gordon, you make a good point in 2 people using the same ratchet.....yes, that would end in the same result.....
    But if I just slammed 4 energy drinks with my bowl of wheaties :-)....I might be putting more pressure on then normal.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by xdmp22 View Post
    I was meaning using the ratchet as opposed to getting someone else to "feel" the mic....or use theirs.....

    Gordon, you make a good point in 2 people using the same ratchet.....yes, that would end in the same result.....
    But if I just slammed 4 energy drinks with my bowl of wheaties :-)....I might be putting more pressure on then normal.....
    NOT IF YOU USE THE RATCHET

    It would make zero difference how strong you are or how many bowls of wheaties you had.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    Tut tut Don't drink and "screw".
    Or thimble you lil' micey

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    Oh and to further the debate....my Chevy is better than your Ford and my XD is better than your glock

    Oh and Mitutoya calipers are better than Starrett


    I think it all boils down to preference.....the ratchets and thimbles can be handy, but are not neccissarily needed....

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    And tomorrow the sun will rise in the west???

    Anything's possible.

    - Leigh

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