Moving multuple steel surface plate. Stacking is ok?
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    Default Moving multuple steel surface plate. Stacking is ok?

    I presume it is ok to stack steel surface plates on top of each other, for transport ?

    Can you place the feet of one plate on the flat surface of another plate, as long as you place some plywood inbetween the two?

    Was also thinking of placing some canvas between the plywood and the top surface of a plate, so it doesn't get scratched.

    Smallish plates,no larger than 24" x 34"

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    how many do you have? Are they all the same? If I had an even number of them and all the same size I would have pairs of them facing each other with cardboard in between then have the feet of the pairs lined up stacking the pairs. Need to secure them so the feet cannot slip.

    dee
    ;-D

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    I presume it is ok to stack steel surface plates on top of each other, for transport ?

    Can you place the feet of one plate on the flat surface of another plate, as long as you place some plywood inbetween the two?

    Was also thinking of placing some canvas between the plywood and the top surface of a plate, so it doesn't get scratched.

    Smallish plates,no larger than 24" x 34"
    Add corrugated paper / cardboard to provide a sacrificial "face" to the plywood.

    Face-to-face is better for flat plates than point-loadimg of legs. Cardboard alone is all you need for that pairing.

    So long as .... they are ratchet-strapped to neither bounce nor slide to and fro AKA "fret" each other's surfaces..

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    Four plates. Two of them are the same, the other two are slightly different sizes. Will place them face to face then . With canvas or cardboard inbetween, and ratchet strap them together.

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    Any idea what this plate weighs?

    It will be lifted with a forklift, so what's the best place to position the forks?

    20" x 30"


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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Any idea what this plate weighs?
    A german one with similar dimensions is 100kg = 220 lbs

    Kontroll- und Prufplatte DIN 876, Gute 0 800 x 500 mm | PMT-Shop - Messzeuge, Messgerate und Prufgerate

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Any idea what this plate weighs?

    It will be lifted with a forklift, so what's the best place to position the forks?

    20" x 30"

    Forks are best placed above goods of that nature.

    Utilizing properly attached resilient slings affixed to NOT slip and drop it.

    If you "weave" a sanely arranged "rope basket" to it/they/each ?

    That can serve for transport end-to-end, protecting as well as making even manual manipulation easier and safer.

    Not complicated. But you DO have to "get it right". So it does NOT SLIP OFF!

    For inspiration, look at the Chinese glyph for the number "four".

    It represents the manner in which they used rope to secure the leather or paper "gasketed" ceramic lid to a difficult to work with ceramic wine, oil, or vinegar vessel .. from very.. very... very ... ancient times.

    It still works, yet today. So they still do it. Sometimes even on steel drums and plastic poly barrels!

    "Run what you got!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Any idea what this plate weighs?

    It will be lifted with a forklift, so what's the best place to position the forks?

    20" x 30"

    425 pounds...just a guess. but here is some source data

    Busch Precision Cast Iron Surface Plates - Penn Tool Co., Inc

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    Just got home after picking the plates. They were smaller and lighter than I expected. Was able to gently tilt one plate's top surface onto the top surface of another plate, with several layers of canvas inbetween.

    Blocked the plates with lumber, and placed rubber vehicle floor mats on the bottom so they didn't move about. Took me about 1 hour 45mins to get every loaded and positioned properly.

    One of the plates is cast aluminum. Thought all surface plates were cast iron.


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