stone for cleaning burrs from gage blocks
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  1. #1
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    Default stone for cleaning burrs from gage blocks

    I slipped and dropped one of the gage blocks from my best set. Now it doesn't wring as well as it should. Where can I get a (hopefully not too pricy) dressing stone for flattening burrs and scratches from gage blocks? I do have a pair of precision ground toolroom stones but think that's not the right thing.

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    I would think you would not want to use any lesser stone on gage blocks than your precision ground toolroom stone, which should in theory remove only the high spots/burs that may have occurred and not remove material otherwise. Obviously it won't fill the lows. This would get you as good as you could hope for I'd think if you're trying to keep this block at the same size it was prior. Most other processes would remove material that you don't want removed.

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    you might try lapping it against a surface plate with some 2000 grit paper. If that doesn't do it, I'd say you need to trash it and get a new one.

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    Precision ground toolroom stone is better as lapping will affect the full surface. Could you just stone the damaged edge without touching the full surface?

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    Look for a hard Arkansas stone from MSC or McMaster etc. They are so fine they won't scratch, but they will knock off burrs.

    That's what I use .

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    I have a Doall labeled 'gage block dressing stone'. It's indistinguishable from a very small piece of granite. I tried rubbing a marginal gage block on it, and it rang well afterward. So perhaps just rub the block on a granite surface?

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    Mitutoyo sell a stone specifically for this purpose. It's so fine that the surface is glossy and the gauge block will actually wring to it while you are using it.

    The few times I have needed to use it, I had to rough the burr down first on a coarser stone, and then finish on the Mits stone.

    The one I have is much smaller than the one I linked, and is part of a gauge block maintenance kit.

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    Suburban Tool has a YouTube vid of their visit to A.A. Jansson which does metrology and calibration of gauge blocks and related. Starting 13 minutes in there's a review of the cleaning and measuring process, and while some steps are left out for competitive reasons, there's enough there that's it's useful to review the video.

    A.A. Jansson Field Trip - A Look Into Precision Metrology - YouTube

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    Quote Originally Posted by billzweig View Post
    Precision ground toolroom stone is better as lapping will affect the full surface. Could you just stone the damaged edge without touching the full surface?
    That's all you can do, and the stone in your hand doesn't matter as much as just proceeding with care, staying OFF the body flat, so as to not make it worse, actually.

    Block would work the same if it had a non-OEM DIY chamfer added to any edge or corner. Not really a show-stopper. It IS only an edge or corner, not the "working" main-body flat.

    If it is REAL BAD, or serious-important, contact AA Jansson or your local European counterpart and have it professionally re-done.

    Or simply replaced.

    I seem to buy sets where more have been lost than damaged, and they've fixed me right up with fill-ins.

    About A.A. Jansson, Inc. - Waterford, Michigan

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    If you do try stoning your block, wear a glove to hold the block or in some other way prevent body heat from locally distorting it. That will help prevent wearing away material you didn't intend to. A tiny, but not zero issue.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    If you do try stoning your block, wear a glove to hold the block or in some other way prevent body heat from locally distorting it. That will help prevent wearing away material you didn't intend to. A tiny, but not zero issue.
    It's surprisingly less tiny than you might think, at least in gauge block terms.

    I have several times demonstrated to guys here a steel gauge block changing shape and dimension with hand heat under a 0.1μm comparator. Just touch your finger on the block and watch the needle start moving.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    It's surprisingly less tiny than you might think, at least in gauge block terms.

    I have several times demonstrated to guys here a steel gauge block changing shape and dimension with hand heat under a 0.1μm comparator. Just touch your finger on the block and watch the needle start moving.
    Sorry.. maybe I misread it all at the outset.

    I am still under the impression there is nothing amiss with the body of the block. That there is just a burr raised on one corner.

    Dunno about the rest of you. But that corner is all I want to touch with a stone.

    EVEN IF - for certainty of clearance, I remove MORE material than was raised in the initial burr.

    Block should again wring proper-like.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    I slipped and dropped one of the gage blocks from my best set. Now it doesn't wring as well as it should. Where can I get a (hopefully not too pricy) dressing stone for flattening burrs and scratches from gage blocks? I do have a pair of precision ground toolroom stones but think that's not the right thing.
    With ceramic blocks burrs wouldn't happen but they cost more

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Sorry.. maybe I misread it all at the outset.

    I am still under the impression there is nothing amiss with the body of the block. That there is just a burr raised on one corner.

    Dunno about the rest of you. But that corner is all I want to touch with a stone.

    EVEN IF - for certainty of clearance, I remove MORE material than was raised in the initial burr.

    Block should again wring proper-like.
    Yes, the corner should be the main area of interest.

    However, finishing on the correct stone is done flat. This is in order to remove displaced material, which can be surprisingly far away from the burr itself, without overly rounding the corner.

    Since you're doing it flat on the stone it's important, as Milland noted, to ensure that you are not distorting the block with the heat of your hands.

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    Webber gage blocks has this to say:

    Stoning Gage Blocks

    Webber makes several gage block stones, shown in this brochure,on page 478

    http://www.jwdonchin.com/Starrett/Catalog/pdf/445.pdf
    Part numbers are GS13, SAO 13, and SAO 23

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    Quote Originally Posted by greif1 View Post
    Webber gage blocks has this to say:

    Stoning Gage Blocks

    Webber makes several gage block stones, shown in this brochure,on page 478

    http://www.jwdonchin.com/Starrett/Catalog/pdf/445.pdf
    Part numbers are GS13, SAO 13, and SAO 23
    The GS13 stone is described as granite, that matches what my DoAll block appears to be.

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    Quote Originally Posted by greif1 View Post
    Webber makes several gage block stones, shown in this brochure,on page 478

    http://www.jwdonchin.com/Starrett/Catalog/pdf/445.pdf
    Part numbers are GS13, SAO 13, and SAO 23

    Thanks. These range in price from 70-450 USD. Does anyone know if the small ones are available for less?

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    Correct. Stone the corner with the stone at a 30 to 60 degree angle to the measuring surface.

    That removes the burr from the corner without affecting the length of the block.

    - Leigh

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Dunno about the rest of you. But that corner is all I want to touch with a stone.

    EVEN IF - for certainty of clearance, I remove MORE material than was raised in the initial burr.

    Block should again wring proper-like.

  25. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by The real Leigh View Post
    Correct. Stone the corner with the stone at a 30 to 60 degree angle to the measuring surface.

    That removes the burr from the corner without affecting the length of the block.

    - Leigh
    From Mitutoyo:


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    I’d buy a new block. You could buy a few for the cost of a stone.

    I would never trust a stoned gauge block!


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