stone for cleaning burrs from gage blocks - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    The Ceraston block by itself costs $225.
    The entire gage block maintenance kit costs $782.

    - Leigh

    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    From Mitutoyo:


  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by The real Leigh View Post
    The Ceraston block by itself costs $225.
    The entire gage block maintenance kit costs $782.

    - Leigh
    Yes, expensive. I got my kit as a clearance, paid a pittance for it, but I accept that I got lucky.

    The point is that the stone is used flat, and that other purpose specific stones are also intended to be used flat.

    I did an accessory block yesterday on mine, the stone is so smooth that a block actually wrings to it slightly while using it. It was just a minuscule tiny nick on the short edge, but under the optical flat I saw that I would have had to stone almost 1mm back from the edge to remove the displaced material if I had been doing it at an angle.

    After I had touched the corner on a normal stone, the block did wring. After I did it flat on the Mit. stone, it wrung very noticeably better.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MCritchley View Post

    I would never trust a stoned gauge block!
    Geez, we already have a thread on drug-impaired workers, now we have to worry about gauge blocks on crack!

    [Or dent, as the case may be]

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    The point is that the stone is used flat, and that other purpose specific stones are also intended to be used flat.
    That is ONLY true of stones that come flat from the factory.

    The technique I suggested will work properly with any stone of good quality. It need not be "wringably" flat.

    If you have a block with damage that extends 1mm back from an edge, it should be replaced, not stoned.

    - Leigh

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    If it's just a corner you could just clean it up with a diamond file.

    I would just buy a new gage block though. Unless it's a decent size that's spendy, you're going to spend more time f-ing around with it than what you can get a new one for.

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by The real Leigh View Post
    That is ONLY true of stones that come flat from the factory.

    The technique I suggested will work properly with any stone of good quality. It need not be "wringably" flat.

    If you have a block with damage that extends 1mm back from an edge, it should be replaced, not stoned.

    - Leigh
    Feels like you're not really reading my posts. W/E

    As far as replacing it, it's not a gauge block, it's a gauge block accessory with a wringable surface. Not easily replaceable.

  8. #27
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    Quite the contrary. You're not reading the posts.
    This thread is about correcting damage to a GAGE BLOCK, not to a gage block accessory.

    If you're post doesn't address the thread subject, I'll delete it.

    - Leigh

    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    Feels like you're not really reading my posts. W/E

    As far as replacing it, it's not a gauge block, it's a gauge block accessory with a wringable surface. Not easily replaceable.

  9. #28
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    No way you hand stone a block to new.
    1 large DYI does not put you anywhere into this world, it is a band-aid and feel good.
    Yes it will wring, it will be compromised.
    Any hard, fine grit with will make it close.
    It is a surface that you need, knock the high off using a angle on a stone first so that there are divots. Lap as you feel.
    Aggressively remove the burrs first without going after the surface.

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    20181011_200159.jpg


    20181011_200208.jpg

    20181011_200234.jpg


    Sorry these are too small to read. The forum uploader shrank them from a 5M image

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  12. #30
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    The message you have entered is too short. Please lengthen your message to at least 10 characters
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20181011_200208-1.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    From Mitutoyo:

    Mitutoyo is not wrong. You have just picked the wrong process for the task at hand.

    IOW "not relevant" to the specific need herein.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    No way you hand stone a block to new.
    Not even under discussion. He has a corner burr. Only.

    The block will lose a small ration of total surface bearing area but its prime dimension will not change.

    Not as if it was a stilleto heel under the load of a reality show ass-inventorian.

  15. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Mitutoyo is not wrong. You have just picked the wrong process for the task at hand.

    IOW "not relevant" to the specific need herein.
    I respectfully disagree. It absolutely is relevant, but how relevant just depends on how much you care, or how good you need it to be.

    This is specifically the finishing process to the roughing process that you and Leigh are advocating.

    To attempt to remove a burr from a gauge block using the Mit. stone would be an exercise in futility, because it is simply too fine. It's purpose is to fully restore flatness after a burr has been removed.

    To reiterate the case I described earlier. The block had a tiny nick on the corner of the short edge. Really tiny, in the ballpark of 0.2mm lets say. I first did exactly as you described, removed the burr against a good normal stone at a very slight angle.

    After which, the block did wring again. However the wring was "soft", for want of a better term. Stuck, but easily unstuck.

    The optical flat showed very tiny irregular pattern around the area with the fringes extending about 1mm away from the edge. After a quick go on the ceraston, the pattern was gone and the block wrung fully "hard".

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  17. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    I respectfully disagree. It absolutely is relevant, but how relevant just depends on how much you care, or how good you need it to be.

    This is specifically the finishing process to the roughing process that you and Leigh are advocating.

    To attempt to remove a burr from a gauge block using the Mit. stone would be an exercise in futility, because it is simply too fine. It's purpose is to fully restore flatness after a burr has been removed.

    To reiterate the case I described earlier. The block had a tiny nick on the corner of the short edge. Really tiny, in the ballpark of 0.2mm lets say. I first did exactly as you described, removed the burr against a good normal stone at a very slight angle.

    After which, the block did wring again. However the wring was "soft", for want of a better term. Stuck, but easily unstuck.

    The optical flat showed very tiny irregular pattern around the area with the fringes extending about 1mm away from the edge. After a quick go on the ceraston, the pattern was gone and the block wrung fully "hard".
    Aberdeen? Yah. I know where that is. Got some Sleeth & Wallace in me own Levi's, long way back.

    You WOULD put the post that made good sense into the thread sequence only after the posts that did NOT make such good sense.

    Not to worry. Our moderator's hint at "hounding you" is honestly come by as well..


  18. #35
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    But after that "surface treatment" the block is not the certified length.

    - Leigh

    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    To reiterate the case I described earlier. The block had a tiny nick on the corner of the short edge. Really tiny, in the ballpark of 0.2mm lets say. I first did exactly as you described, removed the burr against a good normal stone at a very slight angle.

    After which, the block did wring again. However the wring was "soft", for want of a better term. Stuck, but easily unstuck.

    The optical flat showed very tiny irregular pattern around the area with the fringes extending about 1mm away from the edge. After a quick go on the ceraston, the pattern was gone and the block wrung fully "hard".

  19. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by The real Leigh View Post
    But after that "surface treatment" the block is not the certified length.

    - Leigh
    ... by some actually measurable amount, even if I am not he who CAN measure it.

    True, and no real argument about the "is" part, just how tiny the detail OF it.

    Hence A.A. Jansson's or equivalent services.

    OTOH, for what I do, it wouldn't make a damn anyway. The OP may be in the same situation. Our blocks are actually overkill, just not so MUCH overkill a burr can be ignored.

    If it did matter, I'd just rob one of the other sets. It has been VERY much cheaper to pick up nice old never-quite-complete sets than it has been to buy the few missing blocks, so I just quit buying missing blocks and bought a couple more old sets!

    And yes, they are DECADES out of calibration. But again, "for what I do..". they beat all Hell out of trying to re-derive the Millennium yard or cubit off sunset shots with a stick, then divvy-it up!


  20. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by The real Leigh View Post
    But after that "surface treatment" the block is not the certified length.

    - Leigh
    That case is as hard to make as it is to counter.

    My highest resolution means of measurement on hand is 0.1μm LVDT, and if the length is affected by being worked on the ceraston, then it's invisible at that scale.

    Both the Mitutoyo literature that I have seen, and that posted by others already in this thread, state that the length will be unaffected unless the surface is already worn.

    From a subjective point of view, the stone is simply too fine to have any effect on a true flat surface with the surface area of a gauge block face. I will take pictures of my ceraston on Monday. The pictures I linked from Mitutoyo do not at all convey how fine it is. It's glossy, and as I stated earlier, a gauge block will practically wring to it. It does not scratch or even dull the surface of a gauge block in use.

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  22. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    I will take pictures of my ceraston on Monday. The pictures I linked from Mitutoyo do not at all convey how fine it is. It's glossy, and as I stated earlier, a gauge block will practically wring to it. It does not scratch or even dull the surface of a gauge block in use.
    I might buy into that when I see Mitutoyo branded rectal thermometers made of it.

    Have to leave it to a more enterprising soul to chase the dildo and butt-plug market.

    Mind, why leave it to the Japanese? With Brexit coming, their could be an opportunity to revive the market for fine English "bone" china.


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    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    From a subjective point of view, the stone is simply too fine to have any effect on a true flat surface with the surface area of a gauge block face.
    The problem is holding the gage block face parallel to the stone while removing the raised areas. You can't do that. Therefore, the block is held canted, and the abrasive action of the stone operates on that canted face, removing more from one end than from the other. So the faces may no longer be parallel.

    As I said before, this whole subject is OT relative to this thread. I just posted this for the sake of completing the thought, and will delete any further posts on this subject. If you want to discuss this subject, start a new thread.

    - Leigh

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    Quote Originally Posted by The real Leigh View Post
    The problem is holding the gage block face parallel to the stone while removing the raised areas. You can't do that. Therefore, the block is held canted, and the abrasive action of the stone operates on that canted face, removing more from one end than from the other. So the faces may no longer be parallel.

    As I said before, this whole subject is OT relative to this thread. I just posted this for the sake of completing the thought, and will delete any further posts on this subject. If you want to discuss this subject, start a new thread.

    - Leigh
    Oh? Just HOW is use of that stone "OT" to burr removal?

    Seems to be a fetish, this deleting thing.

    So long as you get YOUR oar in first?

    Most days you get overly badge-heavy folks just take the whole damned subject of metrology off to some other venue.

    Guess that lightens the workload, but folk are only stumbling into the metrology forum at all by ACCIDENT last year or three.

    Delete away. I have offline copy. Too late! Most of us actually learnt sumthin' as an enduring take-away already! Ain't up for givin' it BACK!

    Skeeter Davis : Gonna Get Along Without Ya Now - YouTube


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