Use of the word "mil" - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 48
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Vt USA
    Posts
    9,478
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1666
    Likes (Received)
    3453

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    *yawn*

    Not so much dentures as shrapnel, actually. Wiki extract:

    The majority of combat deaths in the Napoleonic Wars, World War I, and World War II were caused by artillery


    Another "mil" - "slang term" for "milliradian".. is used to lay those guns...

    Milliradian - Wikipedia

    Or missiles.

    What with the MIM-14b Whiskey-three-one warshot yield at 20 Kilotons?
    The term "be damned" wudda been justifiable as well.

    Oh fer Mil-dot's sake!

    ;-)

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,645
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1000
    Likes (Received)
    1873

    Default

    Just to confuse everyone a bit more, a "mil" can also be a milliyard, 0.036", or a millimile, 63.36".

    Useful for measuring #64 drills and short people, respectively.

  3. Likes spinninquin liked this post
  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Near Seattle
    Posts
    5,323
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3951
    Likes (Received)
    1645

    Default

    To add to the fun, in US tax systems, a "mill" is 1/1000 of dollar, used to computer property taxes. Good luck getting that replaced....

    (And in general, none of these industries care what you think. Changing would cost big dollars, and return nothing. Get a calculator and move on...)

  5. Likes CalG liked this post
  6. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Country
    SWITZERLAND
    Posts
    1,153
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    148
    Likes (Received)
    465

    Default

    I have read mil with measurements in optics but most predominantly in conjunction with the thickness of photographic films, their base or coating, and magnetic recording tapes. A 1.5 mil base is a plastic web 0.0015" thick.

  7. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    20,855
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    12219

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Orange Vise View Post
    Just to confuse everyone a bit more, a "mil" can also be a milliyard, 0.036", or a millimile, 63.36".

    Useful for measuring #64 drills and short people, respectively.
    "Short" is what you get when the County raises the "millage" on the property taxes:

    Millage Rate Definition

    Otherwise, you ain't "short" unless you can "limbo" under the white line on a highway - with an erection - and not raise a bump in the paint.

  8. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    214
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    62
    Likes (Received)
    94

    Default

    Artillery is aimed with mils, a circle is drawn with a radius of 1000m and divided by π D that gives you 6280 mils around the circle all 1M in length, at 1000M the subtended angle is One mil

  9. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Vt USA
    Posts
    9,478
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1666
    Likes (Received)
    3453

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dresden View Post
    Artillery is aimed with mils, a circle is drawn with a radius of 1000m and divided by π D that gives you 6280 mils around the circle all 1M in length, at 1000M the subtended angle is One mil
    Ah Language

    Artillery are not aimed with mils, Artillery are aimed in RADIANS! A sub-unit of a radian may be a milliradian. or some other.

    "Elevate those guns a little lower, boys"

    "words are the source of all mis-understanding."

  10. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    south SF Bay area, California
    Posts
    2,193
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    234
    Likes (Received)
    769

    Default

    The US military has defined an angular unit that is an aliquot part of a circle approximating the ArcTangent of 1/1000. This unit is named "mil". The military angular mil is indeed used when adjusting artillery, and a fair approximation of a milliradian.

    In decades past, the U S military purchased a significant number of second-order theodolites (for reference, think Wild T-2, Kern DKM-2, Zeiss Th-2, or a number of similar instruments manufactured by other makers) having circles and micrometers graduated in mils.

  11. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    472
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    382
    Likes (Received)
    198

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M.B. Naegle View Post
    ...Mostly just "thou" in our shop/industry...
    This. In a machine shop or mechanical engineering environment 0.001" is "a thou", not a mil.

  12. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Vershire, Vermont
    Posts
    2,803
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1968
    Likes (Received)
    928

    Default

    And a mil can be a million, depending on context.

  13. Likes bryan_machine liked this post
  14. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    247
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    53
    Likes (Received)
    81

    Default

    Worked in Britain for 5 yrs. joke was, we were one people separated by a common language.

    I never used mil for thou. My problem was microns. Was touring a machine shop as an American big shot and the kid leading the tour was giving capabilities for CNC mill centers in microns and I thought, “wow, these machines are awesome.”

    Wasn’t too big a deal, but for me to have to explain my confusion to a young engineer from a country that invented inches (and steel) is annoying. I was in Sheffield. Had a pint in the Henry Bessemer pub and had to explain that to the guys too. That’s like a Brit coming here and explaining what a Ford F-150 is.

    I think 25 micrometers is about one thou. 25 micro inches aka microns is much smaller!

  15. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    14,096
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4810
    Likes (Received)
    5083

    Default

    Anyone doing close work such as grinding to millionths and thousandths would/might consider it confusing/dumb to use the term Mills for a unit of measurement.

    I would tell an engineer, boss, owner, apprentice, co-worker to never use that term in the shop.

    Re; We need this part to be with-in +- 10 mills...What? Call the front office and ask what are they talking about.

    Park the battleship and ask the enemy to wait until we figure this out.

    What? They would not wait...ok, we lost the war...darn

  16. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    6,294
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2225
    Likes (Received)
    2303

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AdamC View Post
    I think 25 micrometers is about one thou. 25 micro inches aka microns is much smaller!
    Erm, you've still got that confused, at least terminology-wise. Micro-inches are not the same as microns. A micron is another word for micro-meter, or one millionth of a meter, which equals 0.00003937" or ~39 micro-inches aka 39 millionths of an inch. You've got the 25 microns = about .001" right though. 25 micro-inches is 0.000025" so yeah, a bit smaller, heh. 40 times that to equal .001"

  17. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Great Lakes USA
    Posts
    305
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    46
    Likes (Received)
    47

    Default

    As one data point here in the US, I have now spent significant time with not 1, not 2 but 3 different heavy mechanical engineering departments whose staff says “mil” to mean .001”. So it does happen. And it drives me nuts.

  18. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    14,096
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4810
    Likes (Received)
    5083

    Default

    Guys/gals who think they are cool using some catchphrase or word and along their path cause millions of dollars worth of problems.

    Back years ago standards were made to put everybody on the same page.

  19. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    247
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    53
    Likes (Received)
    81

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by upthebikes View Post
    As one data point here in the US, I have now spent significant time with not 1, not 2 but 3 different heavy mechanical engineering departments whose staff says “mil” to mean .001”. So it does happen. And it drives me nuts.
    “Tenths”, .1000” and 100-thou confuse newbies where I work.

    Pretty sure Mitutoyo used micron for 1X10-6 inches to describe gage blocks. Reading: I think the term micron is no longer to be used for micrometer, possibly to avoid confusion with micro inches?

    Ironic that such precise people use and insist on imprecise terms (e.g. “scale” etc)

  20. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    6,294
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2225
    Likes (Received)
    2303

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AdamC View Post
    Pretty sure Mitutoyo used micron for 1X10-6 inches to describe gage blocks. Reading: I think the term micron is no longer to be used for micrometer, possibly to avoid confusion with micro inches?
    I have never, not once, seen the word micron used to describe millionths of an inch. Except in the case of someone doing it mistakenly. It is universally understood to be one millionth of a meter. And yes, micron is absolutely still used interchangeably with micro-meter. In point of fact, in all the places I've seen it used, micron is used almost without exception in the place of micro-meter. The exception to that being wavelengths of light, which are generally spec'd in nano-meters or micro-meters.

  21. Likes bryan_machine liked this post
  22. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Paso Robles, CA
    Posts
    189
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    72
    Likes (Received)
    35

    Default

    A millisecond is 0.001 seconds, and a millimeter is 0.001 meters, so ....

  23. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Stillwater, Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,874
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    146
    Likes (Received)
    1110

    Default

    So Mil-Spec might be just a tiny requirement?

  24. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,151
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    70
    Likes (Received)
    415

    Default

    And than there is the rest of the world not having our problem.
    1m = 1000mm, 1mm = 1000µ
    1µ known as 1 muh (Greek letter µ)


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •