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    QT Gordon: That's one of the big advantages of digital. One click to change with most. Costs more though

    Perhaps overkill for hobby but that is very close for a hand held device.
    https://www.amazon.com/Mitutoyo-Digi.../dp/B00WMLMJH2

    I don't own a set of digital micrometers and likely wont buy a set because my dial mics are still good, and now that I'm retired I'm not doing much tenths and better work. But if new to the trades likely I would just for the advantage of going inch to metrics so easily.

    I can measure the close and closer with my dial mics but only with using a Jo Block

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    QT Gordon: That's one of the big advantages of digital. One click to change with most. Costs more though

    Perhaps overkill for hobby but that is very close for a hand held device.
    https://www.amazon.com/Mitutoyo-Digi.../dp/B00WMLMJH2

    I don't own a set of digital micrometers and likely wont buy a set because my dial mics are still good, and now that I'm retired I'm not doing much tenths and better work. But if new to the trades likely I would just for the advantage of going inch to metrics so easily.

    I can measure the close and closer with my dial mics but only with using a Jo Block
    I'm assuming by "dial micrometer" you mean a dial caliper?

    Almost everything I have is digital.
    Nowadays a digital caliper costs less than a dial caliper and is just as accurate and, of course, digital switches between inches and metric.

    I wonder if those that find fractions as being good think about that they, as good as always, have to think in decimals to make anything reasonably accurate?

    Some will be offended but I've always regarded the dial caliper as the evolutionary stage between vernier and digital. I've never bought a dial caliper since the digital appeared on the market.

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    QT: I'm assuming by "dial micrometer" you mean a dial caliper?

    No I meant dial..guess I should have said indicator mics.

    Mahr Gauge 0-1” Indicating/Snap Micrometer 40SF .0001" Jeweled Precision Germany | eBay

    I Just have 1s and 2s, not hard to get 12 millionths or so with good Jo Blocks to read off the snap and right on the line.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    QT: I'm assuming by "dial micrometer" you mean a dial caliper?

    No I meant dial..guess I should have said indicator mics.
    I think the only time I've ever seen any like those would have been at an exhibition and it would be before digital arrived.

    Almost certainly good for certain purposes and expensive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    I think the only time I've ever seen any like those would have been at an exhibition and it would be before digital arrived.
    Nope. Still made but expensive. Only grinder guys need them. I'm surprised you haven't seen them in use. Don't hang out much in accurate shops ?

    Almost certainly good for certain purposes and expensive.
    Good for grinding, yup. Accurate as heck and of course Etalon makes the best

    Digital sucks. Long live analog tools !!

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    I chose used micrometers over new Chinese and I’m happy with my choice. I have digital mitutoyo 1-3” and old WW2 era Starrett #436 1-3”. I like using the Starretts. They are smooth operating and easy to read.

    If money is tight and you like good tools, used and some time for refurbishment is your best choice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamC View Post
    I chose used micrometers over new Chinese and I’m happy with my choice. I have digital mitutoyo 1-3” and old WW2 era Starrett #436 1-3”. I like using the Starretts. They are smooth operating and easy to read.

    If money is tight and you like good tools, used and some time for refurbishment is your best choice.
    Again it seems to get forgotten the OP is in Europe and works metric. Digital in most cases does both otherwise it's one or the other so why buy inches if working in metric?

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    I understand how digital calipers work but how do digital micrometers work? Do they have scales on them that the tool is referencing? I have never used a set so I don't know how the technology reads the movement. I don't see a flat surface to put scales like I have inside my digital calipers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    Again it seems to get forgotten the OP is in Europe and works metric. Digital in most cases does both otherwise it's one or the other so why buy inches if working in metric?
    Just checked ebay.de for fun. You are correct. My advice sucks. The Starrett mics available in ebay.de are mostly inch reading and many are shipping from Great Britain.

    On the flip side, there are many many inexpensive mics available including digitals, but this doesn't help the OP. The name brands we look for here aren't as common in Europe.

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    re: How do encoder in digital micrometers work.

    They use a rotary encoder instead of linear. So, backlash and accuracy of the screw thread is still an issue.

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    Find a new hobby that doesn't involve buying anything.
    Why be a snot?

    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Don't hang out much in accurate shops ?
    Agreed, how else you get stuff really accurate on a grinder or via lapping? I've got Mitutoyo, Etalon and just pickup this Mahr (agreed I think of Etalon as the best, but its hard not like this one).....The Mahr's a duplicated but when stuff of that quantity comes my way cheap, I grab it. Yeah, I just like the good stuff, but I managed to creatively rationalize it as a back up


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    We use a lot of INSIZE instruments at work. They work just fine for us INSIZE

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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamC View Post
    The name brands we look for here aren't as common in Europe.
    I'm not so sure about that. I've got a feeling we (in Europe) have many more brands to choose from than the USA does.

    Speaking only for Europe but Mitutoyo has been facing tougher and tougher competition from Chinese brands and, apparently unlike the USA, very, very few are "cheap rubbish".

    Basically it comes down to how honest the importer is. I can't imagine an importer lasting long here selling cheap rubbish. Of course that companies buy and not employees probably means there are fewer importers in business. Companies tend to stick with the same supplier so selling cheap rubbish would make the company change supplier.

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    I had heard or read that an outfit in Poland made good mics for low cost, don't have a name.

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    Quote Originally Posted by machinistrrt View Post
    I had heard or read that an outfit in Poland made good mics for low cost, don't have a name.
    I'm certain the company you mean is VIS. Visited twice (1990) about 5 years before they closed. VIS was in a very old building and the glass in many of the windows broken. They did though make excellent quality measuring tools. They were also well known for making guns.

    Side note. Visited twice within 2 weeks and between those two times 10,000 zloty became 1 zloty. They (Poland) knocked 4 zeros off their currency. Today they use euro.

    VIS ( Poland ) instruments ( in this case, thread micrometers ) - What gives?

    In fact I still have a couple of the specially made digital calipers I bought from them. Sylvac 3v electronics and Preset function. I also remember the production manager proudly showing me a digital caliper with a 0.001mm display. I don't believe VIS ever put those into production.

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    It's the right step to turn to micrometer when you need a precision tool that is able to provide micron resolution. If your purpose is to measure in 0.01 mm resolution, then selecting micrometer is overpriced.

    My advice is straightforward. Among the micrometers available on the market, narrow your choice to digital micrometer. Digital micrometer is more accurate than screw micrometer today. In terms of digital micrometer, it's very sensitive. I would like to recommend you use Mitutoyo 293-340-30. It's the best digital micrometer. However, compared to the other Mitutoyo high-end micrometer models such as Quantum mike, Mitutoyo 293-340-30 is the standard model you have to purchase.

    The only drawback that concerns me a lot is the ratchet stop. If you are planning to use it with the stand, the ratchet stop will not matter. However, if you prefer to operate it with a single hand, using the ratchet stop is not a good idea. You are better off choosing the ratchet friction.

    Overall, this micrometer is excellent.

    How could I say such like that? Yes, because I have bought it myself and prove it. It's fairly expensive but it's saleable. Someday when you need to upgrade your tools, this can be put in to sell.

    Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullyinstrumentd View Post
    It's the right step to turn to micrometer when you need a precision tool that is able to provide micron resolution. If your purpose is to measure in 0.01 mm resolution, then selecting micrometer is overpriced.

    My advice is straightforward. Among the micrometers available on the market, narrow your choice to digital micrometer. Digital micrometer is more accurate than screw micrometer today. In terms of digital micrometer, it's very sensitive. I would like to recommend you use Mitutoyo 293-340-30. It's the best digital micrometer. However, compared to the other Mitutoyo high-end micrometer models such as Quantum mike, Mitutoyo 293-340-30 is the standard model you have to purchase.

    The only drawback that concerns me a lot is the ratchet stop. If you are planning to use it with the stand, the ratchet stop will not matter. However, if you prefer to operate it with a single hand, using the ratchet stop is not a good idea. You are better off choosing the ratchet friction.

    Overall, this micrometer is excellent.

    How could I say such like that? Yes, because I have bought it myself and prove it. It's fairly expensive but it's saleable. Someday when you need to upgrade your tools, this can be put in to sell.

    Thank you.
    I'm wondering how many makes and numbers of micrometers you have bought to be able to state that Mitutoyo is best?

    Mitutoyo is very good but not my preferred choice. You pay for the name and not just the quality. I am in favour of digital and if "waterproof" is critical then just about any micrometer with IP67 will be excellent.

    Not too long ago I had a 0-25mm / 0-1" digital micrometer sent to a lab for calibration. Not a Mitutoyo. Measured at 10 intervals.

    micrometer.jpg

    I don't think many know how much a micrometer can deviate and still be within specification. With lab certification the ratchet is always used.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    I'm wondering how many makes and numbers of micrometers you have bought to be able to state that Mitutoyo is best?

    Mitutoyo is very good but not my preferred choice. You pay for the name and not just the quality. I am in favour of digital and if "waterproof" is critical then just about any micrometer with IP67 will be excellent.

    Not too long ago I had a 0-25mm / 0-1" digital micrometer sent to a lab for calibration. Not a Mitutoyo. Measured at 10 intervals.

    micrometer.jpg

    I don't think many know how much a micrometer can deviate and still be within specification. With lab certification the ratchet is always used.
    Great reply, Gordon.

    I am happy you give me feedback. To be honest, I collect the models from the market, then go to each brand's website to see their latest models, compare the spec, then compare the customer reviews. Further, I bought myself to see directly how Mitutoyo 293-340-30 actually is. So, it's consistent. I like the way it turns. What people said about its thimble turn is true.

    I think that's the best micrometer. However, in terms of professional use, it's the standard one. The concerns are at its speed, ratchet stop, and no data output port. What concerns me is the ratchet stop.

    I think IP65 is the standard rating for digital micrometer since it's greater to get exposed to water rather dropping into a water vessel. Even though a particular digital micrometer is labeled with IP67, it doesn't mean it has been tested with IP65 test series. Vice Versa.

    Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullyinstrumentd View Post
    Great reply, Gordon.

    I am happy you give me feedback. To be honest, I collect the models from the market, then go to each brand's website to see their latest models, compare the spec, then compare the customer reviews. Further, I bought myself to see directly how Mitutoyo 293-340-30 actually is. So, it's consistent. I like the way it turns. What people said about its thimble turn is true.

    I think that's the best micrometer. However, in terms of professional use, it's the standard one. The concerns are at its speed, ratchet stop, and no data output port. What concerns me is the ratchet stop.

    I think IP65 is the standard rating for digital micrometer since it's greater to get exposed to water rather dropping into a water vessel. Even though a particular digital micrometer is labeled with IP67, it doesn't mean it has been tested with IP65 test series. Vice Versa.

    Thank you.
    We'll get this out of the way first

    IP Code - Wikipedia

    Since you collect how many different makes of micrometer do you have?


    The 2 things I like most about digital are:

    1. What you see is what you measure. Assuming you "zero" correctly.

    2. With most the change between metric and inch is with one push of a button. It also means the manufacturer doesn't have to think about what system the market uses.

    Now moving off subject but one thing does annoy me. Don't know about inch micrometers but metric micrometers come with 3 different spindle diameters. 6.35mm (1/4"), 6.5mm and 8mm (5/16"). I always avoid 6.5mm.

    Bought some (digital) micrometers recently and a "gadget" was included as standard. Note the 5mm ball in the bottom right hand corner. When pushed onto the micrometer anvil makes measuring wall thickness easy. I don't know why it isn't standard with all micrometers.

    m1.jpg m2.jpg

    In case anyone wonders that micrometer still has the "protection" on the display screen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    We'll get this out of the way first

    IP Code - Wikipedia

    Since you collect how many different makes of micrometer do you have?


    The 2 things I like most about digital are:

    1. What you see is what you measure. Assuming you "zero" correctly.

    2. With most the change between metric and inch is with one push of a button. It also means the manufacturer doesn't have to think about what system the market uses.

    Now moving off subject but one thing does annoy me. Don't know about inch micrometers but metric micrometers come with 3 different spindle diameters. 6.35mm (1/4"), 6.5mm and 8mm (5/16"). I always avoid 6.5mm.

    Bought some (digital) micrometers recently and a "gadget" was included as standard. Note the 5mm ball in the bottom right hand corner. When pushed onto the micrometer anvil makes measuring wall thickness easy. I don't know why it isn't standard with all micrometers.

    m1.jpg m2.jpg

    In case anyone wonders that micrometer still has the "protection" on the display screen.
    That "gadget" has been around for at least 45 years.
    Micrometer Accessories


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