Wireless Sensor Integrated Cutting Tools
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0

Poll: If your cutting tool could talk, what would it tell you?

Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Lightbulb Wireless Sensor Integrated Cutting Tools

    What would you want to see developed from this technology:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KC4jHX-EWEk

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KC4jHX-EWEk

    These tools use Bluetooth to transmit data from sensors located at various locations on the tool and tool holder. Information like torque, temperature, and vibration can be collected during cutting.

    Torque data allows real time estimation of surface finish, prediction of chatter conditions, monitoring run out, and wear monitoring.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    8,201
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    746
    Likes (Received)
    1103

    Default

    Wireless is an unreliable communication technology. Always has been, always will be.

    Using wireless in a machining environment is an invitation for a bunch of attorneys to get rich, and businesses to go bankrupt.

    The first accident that happens on a machine using one of these tools, you won't be able to see over the top of the stack of legal paperwork. The shop owner will see the same pile of paper. And it won't make the slightest difference whether the tool was at fault or not.

    Bad idea looking for a place to hide.

    - Leigh

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Longmont, CO
    Posts
    49
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Leigh,

    I would respectfully have to disagree with you on the unsuitability of wireless in a machining environment. For sure critical systems are safer being wired. However for metrology purposes such as in situ monitoring (passive roles) this safety concern is minimal.

    I personally have worked on wireless systems for machine monitoring in many semiconductor process systems (talk about risk averse people --- with one workpiece being worth 10's of thousands $$$$). You can learn alot from in situ monitor done in a passive sense and it is very easy to collect the data to prove it.

    Mark

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    8,201
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    746
    Likes (Received)
    1103

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by martel View Post
    I would respectfully have to disagree with you on the unsuitability of wireless in a machining environment. For sure critical systems are safer being wired. However for metrology purposes such as in situ monitoring (passive roles) this safety concern is minimal.
    Hi Mark,

    I would agree with you in theory regarding process monitoring. I do have significant professional experience in the design of RF systems, as an engineer for Motorola.

    But unfortunately that's not today's reality. The insanity that pervades our judicial system now is such that any manufacturer remotely associated with an industrial accident WILL be sued.

    And they wonder what's happened to American industry.

    Thanks.

    - Leigh


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •