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Thread: 1000 EE on ebay

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    Default 1000 EE on ebay

    "original 20 HP DC motor"

    20 HP???? What were they trying to do, take an inch of steel off per pass???


    Monarch 13x30 1000EE Lathe 1956 | eBay

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    That sure likes a BEEFY steady rest, add says original to machine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bll230 View Post
    "original 20 HP DC motor"

    20 HP???? What were they trying to do, take an inch of steel off per pass???


    Monarch 13x30 1000EE Lathe 1956 | eBay
    Well it sure is not some piss ant south bend, my L&S has 20 hp My 13" holbrook has 5.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bll230 View Post
    "original 20 HP DC motor"

    20 HP???? What were they trying to do, take an inch of steel off per pass???


    Monarch 13x30 1000EE Lathe 1956 | eBay
    Well, not sure it IS "20 HP". Given Dee Cee's power curve, ten would have been plenty in Machine Tool use.

    And "surely". if they had the need, that's only half an inch on the radius.

    Good coolant, Tantung-G and half an inch per pass COULD come off. Presuming the chuck or collet could grip the STOCK firmly enough. Not b***y likely with a 3-Jaw scroll unless the stock was hex.

    Rubberflex can't take that - the blades can tilt. Burnerd Multi-size CAN stand it. Steel the blades sit in. Not rubber.

    But even so.. 20 HP nominal, would be utilized where 10 HP was needed at the extreme ends of a variable speed range.

    Uber-extremes of stability in exotic materials to be cut might mean that even less - say 5 to 7.5 HP might have served for slower work in ignorant steels.

    So it IS "overkill"... or "deep pockets" of "reserve" power, if you will.

    OTOH? That can work. "By-products" and all.

    After all, Nagasaki, Japan was remarkably free of substandard structures in violation of electrical building codes by 7 August 1945, whether that had been the primary goal of the 6 August exercise or not.
    Last edited by thermite; 10-18-2020 at 12:02 AM.

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    Ran Hard and put away wet, it is 1000ee but what a wreck...Phil

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    Hopefully one of the 1000EE experts will chime in. I thought all 1000EE’s had an L-shaped base casting. This one does not, but it looks like from one of the photos that it used to. Didn’t realize the L portion of the base was removable. Maybe that is where all the C16J’s used to live?

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    He said in the add it was repowered but kept the 20hp DC motor. L section had the DC drive in it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rimcanyon View Post
    Hopefully one of the 1000EE experts will chime in. I thought all 1000EE’s had an L-shaped base casting. This one does not, but it looks like from one of the photos that it used to. Didn’t realize the L portion of the base was removable. Maybe that is where all the C16J’s used to live?
    The electronics casting IS a removable addition to the base. This is where the casting bolted onto the main base.

    Steve
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20141107_225911.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    He said in the add it was repowered but kept the 20hp DC motor. L section had the DC drive in it?
    For-damned-sure a superb St. Mary's foundry cast IRON housing would protect fragile glass of the "thermionic valve" era far better that a s**t-metal JEDEC cabinet!

    Monarch Machine Tool executed to "industrial strength" about as well as was ever done, anywhere, any time, short of an Iowa-class "BB" hull.

    That said, better ribbing inside their upper and lower 10EE HS covers wudda been "right nice of them". Same again TS locking handles.

    Can't have everything.. Must have been a struggle, what with Henry Hendey's gang grabbing up all the spare Iron!



    As to 're-powered".. DC drive design has advanced. Big time.

    It could benefit from being re-powered AGAIN. Greater cost if it needs a bed re-grind. And all that goes WITH that.

    A newer lathe that was less of a "legend in its time", but is eminently useful NOW, could be far the wiser economic choice?

    Monarch Lathe "in the current era" does sell more that a few that could qualify, even if of German or Czech manufacture?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bll230 View Post
    "original 20 HP DC motor"

    20 HP???? What were they trying to do, take an inch of steel off per pass??
    A common beef with variable speed belt-drives was they didn't have any grunt at low rpm. So they put a much bigger motor on so it'd have some pull at low speeds, like a geared-head did. That 20 hp is probably around 3 at 150 rpm.

    The Lodge & Shipley AVS "Answer" lathe was the same way, and still got criticism for no power at low speeds.

    Considering what people pay for crappy stuff, that one doesnt look too bad. Make offer

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    A common beef with variable speed belt-drives was they didn't have any grunt at low rpm. So they put a much bigger motor on so it'd have some pull at low speeds, like a geared-head did. That 20 hp is probably around 3 at 150 rpm.

    The Lodge & Shipley AVS "Answer" lathe was the same way, and still got criticism for no power at low speeds.

    Considering what people pay for crappy stuff, that one doesnt look too bad. Make offer
    Similar phenomenon to a Reeves or PIV, but generally worse, variable VFD or DC drive.

    Last time I looked, all "EE" were DC final-drive. As were gen ONE of Large & Shapely "AVS". Later AVS, and current rebuild "as new" Monarch EE are VFD'ed 3-Phase motored.

    L&S AVS had the advantage of "some" geared-head ratios, even if far fewer than their ALL geared-head Powerturn litter-mates.

    Not that anyone "stateside" might give a damn, but AFAIK, Cazeneuve went from hydraulically controlled "Reeves-like" variator belt to electic jackscrew operated then directly to servo motor, current production "Optica" / "Optimax", former HBX.

    Jerry B. "macona" was one of several who fitted a servo to a 10EE.

    Wouldn't be out of the realm of reason to do the same to a larger EE off the back of plenty of affordable CNC spindle drive part-outs in the current market.

    Not that it NEEDS it...
    2CW

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    I peeked within this thread due to my overwhelming ignorance and was treated to thermite in rare form with this bit regarding overkill and its virtues . . . "After all, Nagasaki, Japan was remarkably free of substandard structures in violation of electrical building codes by 7 August 1945, whether that had been the primary goal of the 6 August exercise or not."

    Good grief man, reading that resulted in me spewing hot coffee and some of it dribbled out my nose. That hurt! Some warning would be nice next time, eh?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbeech View Post
    I peeked within this thread due to my overwhelming ignorance and was treated to thermite in rare form with this bit regarding overkill and its virtues . . . "After all, Nagasaki, Japan was remarkably free of substandard structures in violation of electrical building codes by 7 August 1945, whether that had been the primary goal of the 6 August exercise or not."

    Good grief man, reading that resulted in me spewing hot coffee and some of it dribbled out my nose. That hurt! Some warning would be nice next time, eh?
    When you feel that mouth full of coffee moment about to happen go ahead and expell it quickly. Trying to contain the reaction is where the problem occurs. Its coming out one port or the other. The nose is the relief valve.
    Just spit it out, clean up the mess, and pour another cup.

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    Errr... The plutonium based atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki on August 9th not the 6th. August 6th was the uranium based bomb on Hiroshima.

    David

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    Well interesting how a lathe thread has turned into a history lesson. On the other hand, as a former Naval Nuclear Propulsion Officer with only a limited knowledge of the bomb side of nuclear design, I am always interested in learning about bomb design.

    Edit: Implied but not stated, in looking up the 1000EE on PM I came across other threads about 1000EE and 13EE and the Monarch lathe that could hold .0000025, forgot the name, that was used to machine cores.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bll230 View Post
    Well interesting how a lathe thread has turned into a history lesson. On the other hand, as a former Naval Nuclear Propulsion Officer with only a limited knowledge of the bomb side of nuclear design, I am always interested in learning about bomb design.
    Lookup "Swan Device" with a convenient web search tool.

    Edit: Implied but not stated, in looking up the 1000EE on PM I came across other threads about 1000EE and 13EE and the Monarch lathe that could hold .0000025, forgot the name, that was used to machine cores.
    Maybe the Moore "T" lathe? I was given to understand that most of the Pu pits were machined on 10EEs. I worked in one of the early bomb assembly buildings for a year, luckily long after bomb components were in the building. When I was there it had been converted into a SCIF, easily done since there were no windows and it had 18" concrete walls (and, I suspect, a mostly 'blow-off' roof).

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    Quote Originally Posted by mllud22 View Post
    When you feel that mouth full of coffee moment about to happen go ahead and expell it quickly. Trying to contain the reaction is where the problem occurs. Its coming out one port or the other. The nose is the relief valve.
    Just spit it out, clean up the mess, and pour another cup.
    ME? WTF! YOUSE GUYS as are chronic abusers of my cawfee-stained keyboard!

    TIP:

    Common open-top 13 gal plastic pail type waste can, the cheapest sort.

    Placed just to my left so IF I can hold it, turn the head annnnnd the cawfee is shot in that direction and laundering the keyboard avoided! A miss is OK. Porcelain tile floor in the study!

    old_dave is correct. I got the dates wrong.

    Calendar skills were not up to par, given I was not yet five months old.
    He must be enough older to have remembered better?

    "Older" is a feature, not a bug.. given the alternative, anyway.

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    I couldn't remember the reference on the nuclear core machine, but then I remembered. Out of the history on lathes.co.uk


    "Series 180 Ultra-Precision (PHH) contouring lathe was introduced. The first of these machines was sold on 7-25-57, Series 180 Model 1511. The Series 180 was the most precise lathe in the world at the time. It was mainly used in nuclear research labs. Approximately 20 of these lathes were built."

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    Quote Originally Posted by bll230 View Post
    ... the Monarch lathe that could hold .0000025"
    I don't like to sound skeptical but .... I've seen facing lathes for making floppy disks, large slabs of granite with air bearings working on a fairly soft material, and they didn't claim tolerances like that.

    How would you measure this ? And what does "hold" mean in this case ? For that matter, what does "tolerances" mean ? Roundness, straightness, size ?

    Some claims are just unrealistic ....

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    A 1000ee brochure from an old post.
    Copies too small to read.
    Here is a link.
    1000ee brochure copy
    Is that the tolerance in upper right corner by the micrometer in blue
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails untitledhhhhhhhhhh.jpg   untitlednn.jpg  


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