10EE (#15491) 220v Powering Checklist - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    In my case, the VFD is simply replacing the existing 3 phase starter (under the cover on the backside of the machine) for running the 3 phase motor. The VFD, in my case, is simply being used to convert single phase 220 VAC power to 3 phase 220 VAC power for spinning the 3 phase motor running the MG set. There is no need to for the 3 phase motor in a MG set to actually run at less than full speed (60 hz) which the VFD can easily do.


    I get what you are wanting to do.....big 220 VAC single phase VFD to provide 3 phase to a bunch of machines, but the reality is a VFD is normally dedicated to and directly wired to a motor. I'm not saying it can't be done to power multiple machines, but your are creating a tangled web. I suppose that is one advantage of a rotary phase converter.....maybe not so sensitive to such issues.

    In my shop, I run two 3 phase machines with dedicated single phase powered VFD's. One is a milling machine and one is the 10ee.

    What I found is a cheap 2hp vfd is like $125 or so, and a 4KW iirc (running the 10ee) was $175.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skywalker View Post
    Perhaps I need to just buy 3 more VFDs, and run everything separate?
    This is becoming more and more complex.
    What seemed like a simple solution to create a small power supply for a few machines,
    has spiraled into oblivion. LOL
    Thanks for attempting to clarify the particularities!
    >>> Phoning an electrical engineer now...I'll make chips eventually.
    -Luke

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  3. #22
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    I believe we have worked out the solution:
    1) As for the overload and stall protection of multiple sized motors...individual overloads on the contactors.
    2) As for protection against switching on/off/or choosing between machines while the drive is powered,
    an interlock wired thru the 'drive enable' function that will not allow selections to be made under power.
    3) An AC load reactor placed in line to clean up the 'dirty' 3ph.

    The drive also states it has ASIC to avoid inrush current damage to the IGBTs. Whatever that is...LOL

    I'm glad to have knowledgeable people in areas where I lack...
    -Luke

  4. #23
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    IGBT = insulated gate bipolar transistor

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skywalker View Post
    ...
    This is becoming more and more complex.
    What seemed like a simple solution to create a small power supply for a few machines,
    has spiraled into oblivion. LOL ...
    That's why a rotary phase converter (RPC) is a very good choice for a shop like yours. They are really very simple affairs: a relay, one or more starting capacitors and one or more run capacitors. You can buy an assembled panel from WNY Supply for $140 to $250 or a kit to build your own panel for about half that. Used 3-phase motors usually sell for under $10 per HP. (I don't have any relation to WNY, but I've gotten good feedback from multiple people who use them.) You can even run a 10EE from a so-called "static phase converter", which is basically the same panel used for an RPC, minus the idler motor. There are several members here running 10EE MGs from static converters.

    Cal

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    That's why a rotary phase converter (RPC) is a very good choice for a shop like yours. They are really very simple affairs: a relay, one or more starting capacitors and one or more run capacitors. You can buy an assembled panel from WNY Supply for $140 to $250 or a kit to build your own panel for about half that. Used 3-phase motors usually sell for under $10 per HP. (I don't have any relation to WNY, but I've gotten good feedback from multiple people who use them.) You can even run a 10EE from a so-called "static phase converter", which is basically the same panel used for an RPC, minus the idler motor. There are several members here running 10EE MGs from static converters.

    Cal
    I had originally priced the option of a RPC, and it really seemed at the time to be a more expensive option.
    Hindsight is 20/20.
    Thanks for the input.
    -Luke

  8. #26
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    Hi Luke,

    One more thing you might want to check is the wire gauge for the lathe. Especially if it was previously wired for 440 VAC input. I would hope that the wire would be sized for both voltages (220 VAC and 440 VAC), but it is easy to check for peace of mind. Good luck with the project!

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