10ee Carriage stop rod question - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I wanted to revive this old thread. I've read through both this one and the previous thread linked in the #2 reply, but I still can't wrap my head around how the carriage stop rod actually works. My stop rod is missing but the previous owner installed a shaft in it's place. If the original rod was in there I don't see how the thread screw would be disengaged (if it's suppose to) if the carriage was driven into it. Can someone provide a brief description of how the mechanism works??

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    If you crash into that its game over, at that point in time, the weakest link is found. Ideally EE 3496 pin but most likely EE 3495 arm.

    Very ingenious design being wrapped around both the FWD/NEU/REV back gear selector and also the detented shaft itself.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt_isserstedt View Post
    If you crash into that its game over, at that point in time, the weakest link is found. Ideally EE 3496 pin but most likely EE 3495 arm.

    Very ingenious design being wrapped around both the FWD/NEU/REV back gear selector and also the detented shaft itself.
    Here are a couple pictures that show the inside of the doghouse. The plunger is spring-loaded and it provides an excellent detent. See the bottom picture to see what happens in a crash.

    img_1471.jpg

    img_1472.jpg

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdub63 View Post
    ... I still can't wrap my head around how the carriage stop rod actually works. ... Can someone provide a brief description of how the mechanism works??
    It's designed to work in conjunction with a micrometer head and an indicator, or optionally a hard stop. In the latter case, only when fed by hand. The mechanism shown above is there simply to positively engage the notches in the rod so that it can be precisely moved in 0.50" increments. The rod doesn't interact with spindle or feed gearing in any way; it's just a there to hold the micrometer head in place. As already mentioned, if you feed the carriage hard into it, you'll break something.

    Here's a thread that shows the Monarch indicator and case: 10EE gadgets
    Here's a thread that shows one of the fixed stops: 10EE 4 Station Micro Carriage Stop

    I think Russ posted an illustration from one of the brochures that shows the stop rod, micrometer head and indicator together, but I wasn't able to easily locate it. Here's Russ' collection of carriage stops and indicators: 10EE gadgets

    Cal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    The rod doesn't interact with spindle or feed gearing in any way; it's just a there to hold the micrometer head in place.
    This cleared it up. As stated, it's interesting that Monarch designed the stop in the same casting as the threading knob, I was wrong in thinking the two were tied together in some way.

    Thanks for all the comments,

    Jim

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    Yeah - When I first saw it, I assumed the same - that it might somehow interact and stop the carriage travel. But, no. Maybe at one point it was considered as a feature and discarded?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim McIntyre View Post
    Yeah - When I first saw it, I assumed the same - that it might somehow interact and stop the carriage travel. But, no. Maybe at one point it was considered as a feature and discarded?
    Some of the earlier machines had a clutch on either the feed rod or the threading rod that stopped a major wreck.

    Hal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim McIntyre View Post
    Yeah - When I first saw it, I assumed the same - that it might somehow interact and stop the carriage travel. But, no. Maybe at one point it was considered as a feature and discarded?
    Mechanical Leadscrew Reverse is the closest thing. Round dials had two versions of leadscrew reverse, electrical and mechanical. Here is the mechanical leadscrew reverse parts diagram which is in all Round Dial manuals.

    The leadscrew reverse rod shifts the headstock dog clutch under power (from Right Hand to Feed when the carriage is moving left, and Left Hand to Feed when it is moving right). Better hope the spindle was not running in reverse!

    screen-shot.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by 220swift View Post
    Some of the earlier machines had a clutch on either the feed rod or the threading rod that stopped a major wreck.

    Hal
    Hal's talking about the feed-rod clutch, which was intended as a safety feature to keep you from running the toolpost into the chuck. There were several versions and not all machines of a particular vintage had the feature. Here's a discussion of one of the round-dial versions: round dial 10EE feed-rod clutch

    Square-dial parts sheet 136 shows another version.

    Cal

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    Cal thanks for filling in the blanks and post the link to your nice write up.

    Hal

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    The electrical ELSR on the round dial might have had some of the spindle stop function as well. I don't have any experience with it but here's a shot of the parts page:

    10ee_old_elsr.jpg


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