10EE dog clutch: grind, leave alone?
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  1. #1
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    Default 10EE dog clutch: grind, leave alone?

    I have the spindle out of my 1942 EE10 to replace the clutch fork. The clutch dogs are rounded, as shown here:
    img_6184.jpg
    Should I attempt to grind these square or just leave them alone?
    Last edited by Cal Haines; 08-05-2019 at 08:15 PM. Reason: fix title

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    Quote Originally Posted by focusrsh View Post
    I have the spindle out of my 1942 EE10 to replace the clutch fork. The clutch dogs are rounded, as shown here:
    img_6184.jpg
    Should I attempt to grind these square or just leave them alone?
    I would but lightly "stone" the edges smooth of burrs - if any - and put 'em back in. They only have to carry power to the threading leadscrew, not-even the more heavily-loaded surfacing drive system, let alone the primary turning torque as those in the reduction gearbox on the motor have to serve.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    I would but lightly "stone" the edges smooth of burrs - if any - and put 'em back in. They only have to carry power to the threading leadscrew, not-even the more heavily-loaded surfacing drive system, let alone the primary turning torque as those in the reduction gearbox on the motor have to serve.
    I agree that they don't have to transmit much torque, but if they're iffy in shifting I feel like this is the time to true up the faces.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    I agree that they don't have to transmit much torque, but if they're iffy in shifting I feel like this is the time to true up the faces.
    They are not used the same way as an Old Skewl "crash box" motor-vehicle transmission- double-de-clutched as one ran up or down through the gears on the move.

    Lathe is NOT meant to be under power, and IS known to benefit from manually turning the spindle over to aid in aligning them for engagement.

    Which is clearly "felt" as you do it, and then.. the knob on the same shaft as the pinion operating the rack which moves the shifter fork is detent-pinned, back side of the actuator knob so none of the above can easily move and let the dogs jump out engagement.


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