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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    The motor looks newer then 50yrs old, I was wondering if the rest of the machine is like that, there are ones like that out there.
    Not quite that nice. Here's pics in this thread when I got it.10EE garage find:

  2. #22
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    The machine looks good from the photos. When I look at these machines, I observe the top of the carriage, if the machine has had a lot of use like my 51 mfg model, the sharp edges of the top of the carriage gets rounded over from miles of steel that have gone through the machine. Also, the legend plates like the fed/thread plate gets all banged up and hard to read, those look to be still crisp on you machine.
    Back in those times, consumer goods were not so good, but the EEs only got better and considerably more expensive. There were the famous European and other machines trying to make inroads to Monarchs domination of the defense/nuclear industry for a small lathe regardless of cost, so Monarch again revamped the design to the machine you have, showing the heavier tailstock with 1 3/4" quill, and circulating oil in the headstock now with only one oil window.
    Monarch simply kicked the competitors butt, in accuracy/durability, and also very important ease of use.

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  4. #23
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    Thanks donie for the insight! This machine really makes me happy and proud to own. And hearing from you that I have a decent machine for its age just adds to that sense of pride. Love this thing!!

  5. #24
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    I think the only lathe I dont like is the Dunlap 109, but I am sure there are folks out that has made great things on them. When I was first exposed to the EE in the late 70s* I was impressed by the ease of use, and parts coming out of the machine with the "Bling", the bling being important, because people are like Bower Birds, they like "Shiny Things". I am not joking at all, if its your boss, a customer, or yourself, a nice looking part often goes further then a perhaps more accurate part.
    I looked at the machines back then and realized it would not be practical to own a tube driven one, the plant where I worked had electricians, but only one could maintain the 3 machines.
    The only alternative was the motor generator models, and those were a rare find, with prices around $10000 through the 1980s, working used module drive machines in only fair condition often over $20000. Not many used dealers wanted to mess with them, as accumulated electrical problems could really bite them bad if they had to buy a machine back fron a customer, and the fact that even highly skilled industrial electricians will have to go through a learning curve on how the machine works and why.
    I was able to get a Motor Generator machine in the late 90s in the bid to make more money machining titanium parts for gear heads, and it worked out great. The nearby Sandvic zirconium/titanium extrusion plant has a variety of shorts, in a variety of alloys and hardness. The EE, with coolant will cut all that stuff along with the prehard 4000 steels. So I ended up phasing out my 2 Southbend heavy 10s.
    I found this forum in the early 2000s, and took a chance on buying a module drive machine that didnt run correctly. There is a combination of experienced machinist along with those that have a greater understanding of electronics, that were able to crack the puzzle regarding these machines.
    I sure I am not alone to realize, that this forum makes it possible for a regular guy to own one of these machines. Perhaps a regular guy off a half bubble, but with some gumption!

    * at that time I was young, low in the order, I was only allowed to use the worst of 3 machines, and only a few times, I was on a gearhead lathe making hydraulic parts most all the time. the old guys got to use the Monarchs and the jigborers.

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  7. #25
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    Thanks donie for the history on your path to the Monarch 10ee. I am not a machinist by trade but a retired policeman that has always loved motors, building, and taking things apart. Machinist is something that is right up my alley and just happened to stumble across a 10ee as my first lathe. This forum and you guys as members have helped me beyond my dreams for fixing and becoming a novice machinist. Wouldn't want to be anywhere else and definitely not without my 10ee and you guys!

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    I think the only lathe I dont like is the Dunlap 109, but I am sure there are folks out that has made great things on them. When I was first exposed to the EE in the late 70s* I was impressed by the ease of use, and parts coming out of the machine with the "Bling", the bling being important, because people are like Bower Birds, they like "Shiny Things". I am not joking at all, if its your boss, a customer, or yourself, a nice looking part often goes further then a perhaps more accurate part.

    I found this forum in the early 2000s, and took a chance on buying a module drive machine that didnt run correctly. There is a combination of experienced machinist along with those that have a greater understanding of electronics, that were able to crack the puzzle regarding these machines.
    I sure I am not alone to realize, that this forum makes it possible for a regular guy to own one of these machines. Perhaps a regular guy off a half bubble, but with some gumption!
    I call that the magpie nature of the human animal. A few days ago the owner of a shop and I were passing a piece on the shipping table. He said "I'm even amazed at the things we make." It is gorgeous, a flanged tube with keyhole slots and other detail, all almost a mirror finish, machined from solid.

    Over ten years ago I contacted the aforementioned owner about a some grinding and he took me on a tour. One thing he had was a Modular 10EE that they couldn't get running. A short time later I needed some quick cash, so I offered to get the lathe running. I'm one of the few people left who worked with thyratrons when they were new. I didn't like them then and my opinion hasn't changed, but I know how to deal with them. My primary profession, if I can be said to have one, is electronics with machining second. I got the lathe running, still is, and that started a relationship that has been mutually beneficial in many different ways.

    Bill

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