10EE speed reducer: what does this part on the linkage do?
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  1. #1
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    Default 10EE speed reducer: what does this part on the linkage do?

    I have a 1942 10EE with a speed reducer. There is a handle on the operator side that connects to linkage that controls the speed reducer.
    speed-reducer.jpg

    Here are photos of the linkage on the lathe and off.
    img_6225.jpg
    linkage.jpg

    So, what is this star-wheel thing on the end of the linkage shaft do? I'm guessing that there was some kind of ratchet that mated to it at one time. Anyone have something similar on their lathe and can post a photo? I suspect there are parts missing.
    img_6227.jpg

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    Looks like a chain sprocket, but the EE gurus will certainly chime in.

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    You're missing something:

    monarch-10ee-speed-pots.jpg

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    See post #5 in this thread Spindle speed stuck need new pots????

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    Quote Originally Posted by focusrsh View Post
    I have a 1942 10EE with a speed reducer. There is a handle on the operator side that connects to linkage that controls the speed reducer.
    speed-reducer.jpg

    Here are photos of the linkage on the lathe and off.
    img_6225.jpg
    linkage.jpg

    So, what is this star-wheel thing on the end of the linkage shaft do? I'm guessing that there was some kind of ratchet that mated to it at one time. Anyone have something similar on their lathe and can post a photo? I suspect there are parts missing.
    img_6227.jpg
    You are looking at a dual-purpose mechanism with two separate, but related, missions.

    The lever arm and outer tube shift the reduction gearbox in or out off a clevis and rod linkage.
    That both selects gross speed "range", and sends a visual signal or "flag" by the handle position as to which range is engaged at the moment.

    The inner shaft "dials" the speed-control rheostats thru somewhere around 270+ degrees of travel by means of a bicycle-chain drive with step DOWN ratio so the small knob is not so overly touchy as one adjusts it. That selects fine speed within each of the two "ranges" - open-belt or "direct", and geared-down. The tachometer does the rest, as it reads net spindle speed, geared down or not.

    That's why the controls were co-located/combined, and the tacho placed in eyeshot. Only one position for a busy hand to reach for.

    Step left. Set up spindle sped.
    Step right, operate the carriage to remove metal.

    It's close enough to change speed whilst in the cut, and 10EE mavins sometimes did exactly that on facing or curved work. Atom bomb cores, we've been told it was automated. Controls had to be remoted, anyway. Radiation and toxicity thing.

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    Thanks to everyone for the explanation.

    Looking again at the manual I purchased through Monarch, photo C has identification arrow #7 pointing to the knob and the rheostat, although I don't find any text referencing them. Not too helpful. By the way, the manual they send for $75 looks like it was done on a copy machine at least as old as my lathe.

    Since my lathe was converted to a KB electronic drive, I have no doubt the rheostat and the chain to it were junked.

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    Quote Originally Posted by focusrsh View Post
    Thanks to everyone for the explanation.

    Looking again at the manual I purchased through Monarch, photo C has identification arrow #7 pointing to the knob and the rheostat, although I don't find any text referencing them. Not too helpful. By the way, the manual they send for $75 looks like it was done on a copy machine at least as old as my lathe.

    Since my lathe was converted to a KB electronic drive, I have no doubt the rheostat and the chain to it were junked.
    Not Monarch's copy machine. Those are done from the original files, so by definition can be many years OLDER than any given lathe. Age shows up most on the schematic. Even though it is the late revision with various revisions as notes and insets.

    As to the missing baby potty seats .. er "rheostats".

    Those old hairy ugly goods delivered full performance, uber low RPM to max on the dial, and at full power.

    At a max 180 VDC sustainable under load - where around 250 VDC once lived? The KB simply cannot.

    Good drives for the money, mind, the KB's. I have a bunch of them.

    All on 180 VDC motors, of course, not 230-270! Those need Eurotherm/Parker-SSD's. Or any of several 3-Phase DC drives. IF you HAVE 3-Phase for them. Can't cheat as you can with a VFD. No capacitor bank, They switch each phase directly off the line.


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    Poking around the web tonight I found a MUCH better copy of a 10EE manual. It has pictures of all the parts not on my lathe.

    https://www.normanmachinetool.com/wp...0EE-Manual.pdf

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    Quote Originally Posted by focusrsh View Post
    Poking around the web tonight I found a MUCH better copy of a 10EE manual. It has pictures of all the parts not on my lathe.

    https://www.normanmachinetool.com/wp...0EE-Manual.pdf
    I HAVE "all the parts not on your lathe". Get a rush of boldness to the arse, want to restore it to factory OEM MG system, it can be made possible, and cheaply so (too often tripping over it!)

    Mind - upping the KB to a Eurotherm/Parker-SSD 514C is WHY the MG parts are surplus, and that's a lot less mass to mess with and waaay less heat and waste if you go that route, instead.

    Cost depends on finding a used 514C affordably vs new - about $300 used vs about $1,000 more money, new, typically, a few hundred more for boost transformer & the right fuses, controls, nearly $300 for the ripple filter/choke, etc. Not cheap, IOW.

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    The original question about the linkage and the missing parts has been answered.

    The unsolicited discussion of drive conversion is off topic.

    THREAD LOCKED.


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