10EE tailstock lubrication dip-stick?
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  1. #1
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    Default 10EE tailstock lubrication dip-stick?

    I've taken the tailstock apart on my 1943 10EE and am a bit confused about the lubrication.
    On the top there is an oil hole and that appears to keep the tailstock screw and spindle lubed. OK.
    Then there is a second hole on the bottom. It leads to a chamber, and from there a brass tube runs to one of the ways. I don't find a metering value so I presume it just drips at will.

    Am I correct so far?

    To the left of the bottom oil hole is another larger hole with something that looks like a mini dip-stick. (See image.) The hole it fits into is blind; I don't find any holes cross-drilled to it. It is like it is just a place to hold the dip-stock. What in the world is this for?

    dip-stick.jpg

  2. #2
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    Oil dauber for oiling the tip of a dead center.

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  4. #3
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    You can make a "white lead" ( if you can find it) slurry to go in that hole if you really want to be authentic . . I think rkepler posted a a good pic pic of the dauber in question a few years ago. It's not hard to make a replica.

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  6. #4
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    I don't know why but it seems common to find 10EE's that still have their daubers.
    I had a 43 round dial that had been around the block more than a few times and still had its dauber.
    It's very unusual to find a South Bend lathe that still has one.


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