10EE vs Hardinge HLVH
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  1. #1
    fausto Guest

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    anibody wants to coment on why one is beter than the other, or is this an unfair comparison hu?
    Im in need of positive reinforcement about my desicions

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    I think a 10EE is much more versatile. It can do the small stuff like a HLVH, but it can also hog big stuff at low speed (HLVH has no gear reduction capability) and also remove serious amounts of metal at high SFPM (requires serious horsepower, which the HLVH lacks). I think the HLVH is more operator-friendly. If I was only doing 1/2"-diameter stuff in collets, I'd go with the HLVH, otherwise the 10EE. YMMV.

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    How about a 10ee vs Hardinge vs (wait for it...) a Colchester Chipmaster! That should get either snikkers or grunts of appreciation for older Colchesters (yes, Rich, I'm biased). Better yet: how about a Holbrook Minor? Cheers, Stan.

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    I'm of the opinion that the 10EE has the advantage in heavy work, the HLVH is nicer for smaller work (particularly when changing carriage feeds). I'd like one of each, but I'll live with a 10EE and something in a 15" throw for the really heavy stuff.

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    I'm with you Stan, as I have a Chipmaster and love it. Talk about rigid and accurate and user-friendly! It's main drawbacks are whine from the variator (even if it's in good shape) and toothed belts in the drive. I don't think the design is as "no-holds-barred" as the 10EE, but it comes close for a helluva lot less money. It's a lot more powerful than an HLVH. I love the clutch/brake. I love the crisp snap-action power feed engagement and disengagement. I wish it had a real spindle lock; I get tired of shifting to low gear and holding the brake when loosening collets. I noticed a Harrison 10 AA (re-badged Chipmaster) failed to reach reserve a day or so ago on eBay. I was surprised it only went to $985. Dealer prices on nice 10AA's are in the $8k range.

  6. #6
    fausto Guest

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    without price as a factor but in the same category the 10EE still comes out on top hu, so why for the most part are the HLV's more expencive than the 10EE? at least for me this was the case when I was looking for a lathe.
    How about some pictures of a nice chipmaster hu?

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    I know for me I rather have an HLVH. The 10EE is an awsome machine but the complicated electrics keeps me from even considering one. I suspect that is why the prices are so much higher on the HLVH.

    If I was an electrical genius, then I would have to say hands down, the 10EE could do what the HLVH does, and more.

    I'd like to have an HLVH, and a good 13-15" Hendey, Monarch, leBlond, or Clausing/Colchester, etc, for the big stuff.

    Most of my work is on the small side so I think the HLVH would work very nicely for me.

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    Well, sorry to be negative about your lathe...but....the only Chipmaster I've used was not nice at all - though probably made worse by being a bit worn. But it was really just a small lathe, not at all comparable to the Monarch etc.
    This Chipmaster was fully loaded with hydraulic copy, turret option, collets etc. but was the most disliked lathe in the toolroom.
    Try a Dean Smith & Grace if you want the best!


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