Anybody have an FA relay for a 10ee they would like to sell?
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  1. #1
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    Default Anybody have an FA relay for a 10ee they would like to sell?

    The FA relay is in the upper left corner on the DC panel for the 10ee. Mine is not working and i need a replacement

    Thanks

    Rich

    PM me if you have one for sale

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    He has a square-dial panel. So he needs a Cutler-Hammer bulletin #222 FA relay. The Struther-Dunn relay from a round-dial is not directly compatible. Works in a Drawer (WiaD) DC control panels also use the same Cutler-Hammer relay.

    Cal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    He has a square-dial panel. So he needs a Cutler-Hammer bulletin #222 FA relay. The Struther-Dunn relay from a round-dial is not directly compatible. Works in a Drawer (WiaD) DC control panels also use the same Cutler-Hammer relay.

    Cal
    Yah but.. ALL these panels and the components they were built from are gone OLD and scarce.

    There must be easily a hundred, if not a thousand, PM members who still know how to take any sufficently "sensitive" relay and "bias" it with a simple network to operate at whetever actuate/release point a given task requires.

    Just as the originals were biased.

    How about we make that a "project" - "workalike" drop-in replacements?

    Plain-old rugged electromechanicals, not adjustable but fragile solid-state. It could be done off the back of still-common relays that need not be all that costly.

    It doesn't have to be that hard as to making bobbins, custom-winding coils, rebuilding armatures, springs, and contacts, whether now or going forward the NEXT 80-plus years.

    So long as it carries the current, cuts in and out at the correct point (narrow "range", actually), the electrons being "routed" by it don't know nor care what BRAND is on the relay that did the deed.

    Have to fab a mounting bracket? Well, Hell... THAT part is a great deal EASIER for a metal-craftsman in a machine shop than winding coils and calculating resistances vs inductances & residual magnetism in the relay's Iron, yah?

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    I can probably repair the relay. I wind coils for other relays in the system. I have one on my lathe for comparison.

    Bill

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    I'm sure it could be done. First would be to define the sequence of operation.
    This relay has two coils, one that operates on amperage and one that operates on DC voltage.
    I would start by figuring what voltage and current makes it click

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    Quote Originally Posted by 9100 View Post
    I can probably repair the relay. I wind coils for other relays in the system. I have one on my lathe for comparison.

    Bill
    You have done MANY.

    But "we" are all become more obviously mortal than our 10EE are! In the fullness of time, many will "adopt" new minders to their service. As they have already, and more than just the one time.

    "Future proofing" might be wise.

    Between the databank that Cal has built - and others -a whole "from-scratch" DC panel can be built with currently-stocked components. Electromechanical & simple in-your-face maintainable, not Solid State "mystery-encapsulated".

    Should be "optionable" to serve any/all of MG, WiaD, or Modular.

    A person should not be "forced" to convert to DC Drive, VFD, or servo.

    Best considered before the diminishing pool of those among us who cut our teeth on "relay logic" are beyond ability to advise how it is done - OR wind a coil.

    "Stone soup" co-op toward a tested and proven "kit plan" Engineering project, anyone?

    Shouldn't be much coin required, all the "treasure" in parts & such many have lying about?

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    Quote Originally Posted by lectrician1 View Post
    I'm sure it could be done. First would be to define the sequence of operation.
    This relay has two coils, one that operates on amperage and one that operates on DC voltage.
    I would start by figuring what voltage and current makes it click
    I have the one on my 10EE to measure. The specs are not that critical. You can get the number of turns for the current coil by unwinding and counting. For the voltage coil you just get the right wire size and fill the volume. If you want me to do it, don't "help" by dismantling part. I would need it exactly in the condition it came off.

    Bill

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    Thanks Bill
    let me make sure it is not working first.
    My problem may lie elsewhere.
    Rich


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