Anyone Re-Grind the Tailstock Taper
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    Default Anyone Re-Grind the Tailstock Taper

    My 10ee tailstock taper is pretty bad. i was thinking of buying a reamer to clean it up, but thinking it might be worth just having it reground. Anyone do this and can recommend a small shop willing to take small jobs. i have called a few grinding shops in the SoCal area and most have high minimums and new customer fees that make it $$$.
    Mark

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    cleans up quick with a mt2 taper reamer.
    i have the reamer if you want to borrow it

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    i just purchase a reamer. thanks for your offer.
    i talked to Steve at Monarch and regrinding the taper is not recommended/possible. he says the tang stop is in the way and will not operate properly if it is ground.
    a new tailstock spindle shaft from Monarch is several thousand??? this is not good as i also have a fair amount of play in the spindle shaft.
    assuming i get the taper in decent condition, what are my options with the main tailstock spindle shaft?

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    Hard chrome and regrind, not cheap either but should be well less than $1K. You might have to cut or grind it a little further undersize so that the chrome buildup will be thick enough after refitting to the tailstock. Your grinder or plater should be able to advise.

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    When I got to that point I simply made a new one. I think I used 1144 Stressproof and when I finished the first w/o error I made a second in MT3. The Mt3 one is OK for drilling but there's not enough meat to deal with significant side loads.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    Hard chrome and regrind, not cheap either but should be well less than $1K. You might have to cut or grind it a little further undersize so that the chrome buildup will be thick enough after refitting to the tailstock. Your grinder or plater should be able to advise.
    do have any recommendations for a shop that does this work?
    i have called several grind shop and machine tool rebuilders and have not had any luck. they are either too busy, this is too small of a job or just not interested. several can't or won't even give me a cost range without looking at it. i guess i understand that they need to see the tailstock, but this limits me to local shops i can drive to for estimates...

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    Quote Originally Posted by rke[pler View Post
    When I got to that point I simply made a new one. I think I used 1144 Stressproof and when I finished the first w/o error I made a second in MT3. The Mt3 one is OK for drilling but there's not enough meat to deal with significant side loads.
    i don't have a big enough grinder or know someone who does to make one...
    i can grind small shafts within a few tenths on my surface grinder, but the tailstock shaft is too long.

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    A new tailstock spindle will not solve your problems. The tailstock housing is worn as well, and the sliding surface on the bottom of the tail stock is worn. To be worth your while, the bottom of the tailstock needs re scraped. Then the spindle bore on the tailstock needs to be reboard oversized, in the proper location for the spindle. Then you need to fit a new spindle to the oversized tail stock bore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    A new tailstock spindle will not solve your problems. The tailstock housing is worn as well, and the sliding surface on the bottom of the tail stock is worn. To be worth your while, the bottom of the tailstock needs re scraped. Then the spindle bore on the tailstock needs to be reboard oversized, in the proper location for the spindle. Then you need to fit a new spindle to the oversized tail stock bore.
    sounds expensive

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    Quote Originally Posted by everettengr View Post
    sounds expensive
    Stupid expensive if you have to hire it done. If its a hobby machine and you can include maintenance work in your hobby, its quite enjoyable. But any machine with a tailstock taper that has enough wear to need reground has numerous other wear points that will detract from the value of the reground taper.

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    Quote Originally Posted by everettengr View Post
    do have any recommendations for a shop that does this work?
    No, unfortunately, and certainly not in your area.

    One other thing you could try if the wear is significant (over .003") and reasonably uniform is to try some phosphor bronze shim stock as a liner. It's availability in thinner sheets (.001" - .002") is a little tricky to find, but if you're thinking of boring the tailstock casting a little larger to bring it back to proper center height then you could plan on using thicker material.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    No, unfortunately, and certainly not in your area.

    One other thing you could try if the wear is significant (over .003") and reasonably uniform is to try some phosphor bronze shim stock as a liner. It's availability in thinner sheets (.001" - .002") is a little tricky to find, but if you're thinking of boring the tailstock casting a little larger to bring it back to proper center height then you could plan on using thicker material.
    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    Stupid expensive if you have to hire it done. If its a hobby machine and you can include maintenance work in your hobby, its quite enjoyable. But any machine with a tailstock taper that has enough wear to need reground has numerous other wear points that will detract from the value of the reground taper.
    yes it is a hobby machine and yes there is wear everywhere (hey, it is a 60-year old lathe).
    but, if i could get a new spindle, or make new one rough and have it ground, or get it chromed and have it ground would that be enough to tighten it up in the existing bore; or is that a waste of time/$$. doesn't need to be like new, just usable...

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    The taper in the T/S of both my EE's was worn at the ends. The center 1"+ was unworn.
    The center I was using only seated on that 1"+ area, and squirmed around with any side movement.
    This resulted in lots of chatter.
    Since the quill was too hard to ream, I had the taper hard turned to clean up.
    CNC lathes are a wonderful thing for a job like this.

    Bill

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    Quote Originally Posted by hitandmiss View Post
    CNC lathes are a wonderful thing for a job like this.

    Bill
    i have a cnc mill, not a lathe...

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    A new tailstock spindle will not solve your problems.
    This. You can't recondition just one part of a machine and expect great results. Correct fix is to hard chrome, grind to fit a honed bore....then scrape into alignment with the bed then scrape the headstock into alignment with the tailsttock. Yeah, major project.....if the full monty is not in the cards right now, clean up the taper with a reamer so it holds and leave the rest. just my view on it.

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    Hi Folks,

    For what it's worth, I'm in the same boat with my 10ee rebuild. The TS casting bore is bellmouthed by 0.005" at the left/business end. I've been looking high and low for a honing/grinding shop that will take it on.

    The only place I've found that will do the work end to end is Grind All in Ohio. They quoted me $1500 to hone/bore out the TS cylindrical then plate up the quill and regrind it to a perfect fit.

    I bought the whole $&*^! lathe for $3500 so that's quite a pill to swallow. I haven't decided what I'll do yet but would welcome opinions.

    Cheers,
    jim

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    I've had luck buying an entire used tailstock. Ended up being in alignment better than the original I needed the parts for (didn't even scrape the base). I understand that plenty of risk/luck is involved, though.

    I remember the quills were not interchangeable; I imagined they are lapped to fit individually?

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    That kind of work was only $750 20yrs ago, money is worth less now.
    My really worn 1951 manufacturing model has a lot of slop in the quill, but the most important thing is that the quill is in alignment with the spindle.
    Almost always the quill is pointing down and toward the rear of the machine, the cause is moving the tailstock along the bedway by its handwheel.
    To help reduce wear, the tailstock can be grabbed by the right hand at the back between the ways, with a couple of fingers of the left hand under the front lifting slightly. That can be done even when peck drilling, with not much loss in time.
    Anyway, the tailstock is worn the quill is out of alignment, and it sucks for most uses. And because tools enter at an angle they do the wobble from the wear in the quill.

    Fix it any way you want, but here is the donie path of least resistance!

    Take the base of the tail stock, file the ridges from the V and flat, then scrape it a bit so it has reasonable contact with the bed. Not, trying to level the top of the base at this point, just going along with the wear. Don't try to be too critical there because you probably have bed wear as well.

    Take the tailstock base and prop it up on your mill. using round rod in the V and shimming the flat on the bottom, begin fly cutting the top flat, you can remove it, and test on the lathe to adjust the shimmed flat side, so it ends up reasonably level.
    Then, depending on how much material had to removed from the top of your tailstock base, will be the thickness of the shim or plate to bring the tail center back up and level.
    With that done, the slop in the quill is not near the problem it was.

    On the later lathes with the large quill, the tailstock has to be lubed with spindle oil, or it will be hard to move the handwheel, my old one I use way oil.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim314159 View Post
    Hi Folks,

    For what it's worth, I'm in the same boat with my 10ee rebuild. The TS casting bore is bellmouthed by 0.005" at the left/business end. I've been looking high and low for a honing/grinding shop that will take it on.

    The only place I've found that will do the work end to end is Grind All in Ohio. They quoted me $1500 to hone/bore out the TS cylindrical then plate up the quill and regrind it to a perfect fit.

    I bought the whole $&*^! lathe for $3500 so that's quite a pill to swallow. I haven't decided what I'll do yet but would welcome opinions.

    Cheers,
    jim
    the 1500 maybe isn't entirely unreasonable. But its a lot of money. For it to make sense, imo, it would have to be part of a full reconditioning in which the total time and money makes what you paid for it a bit irrelevant. You can DIY,but it takes some tooling up. I can do cylindrical grinding on a T&CG I rescraped and rebuilt a sunnen hone...the two things you need (although the weight makes me thing a portable hone, either sunnen or diy might be easier). I've three tailstocks to do, in the middle of doing a Holbrook B8 at the moment. Had to make honing tool for the Sunnen to get the the length needed. Nothing is easy lol. You can also lap both the bore and quill. If I didn't have a grinder, I turn a turn a quill and lap to finish the quill to size. I'll probably lap mine in any event as the finish and accuracy is so nice. oh yea, you should grind the quill before chroming (not for dimension obviously, but for a good bond.....plating shop told me to)
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 11-24-2019 at 03:33 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim314159 View Post
    Hi Folks,

    For what it's worth, I'm in the same boat with my 10ee rebuild. The TS casting bore is bellmouthed by 0.005" at the left/business end. I've been looking high and low for a honing/grinding shop that will take it on.

    The only place I've found that will do the work end to end is Grind All in Ohio. They quoted me $1500 to hone/bore out the TS cylindrical then plate up the quill and regrind it to a perfect fit.

    I bought the whole $&*^! lathe for $3500 so that's quite a pill to swallow. I haven't decided what I'll do yet but would welcome opinions.

    Cheers,
    jim
    i'm in your boat too. paid $3.5k for the lathe but i knew it needed some restoration work.
    i don't mind paying to have things done and also doing what i am capable of completing myself. (already did the Parker/Eurotherm drive upgrade)
    but, i'm having a hard time finding local shops willing to do this kind of work???
    the hunt for a machine rebuilding shop continues...


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