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  1. #1
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    Default Experience fixing broken handles

    I have a 1944 16CY that had one of the cylindrical bosses on a gear-box selector handle broken off. I attempted to TIG braze it back on. The attempt was "successful" in that the parts are stuck together but it isn't pretty. It seemed like the difference between the base metal melting point and the Silicon Bronze brazing rod was either too small or beyond my skill. Even at 40A the base metal was melting. I think one mistake was that I used too large of a rod at 3/32".

    Some of the other handles have had repair jobs before and the results look about as terrible as my own efforts. I'm curious if anyone else has tried other methods on WWII-era Monarchs and what the results were.

    Brazing material: ERCuSi-A 3/32"
    Welder: Scrach-start DCEN #8 cup with 20 CFM 100% Argon
    Amps: 38-60A

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    Just get out a file and make it pretty.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Superbowl View Post
    Just get out a file and make it pretty.
    A grinder and paint,
    can make a welder,
    something he ain't!

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    FWIW

    I've patched up handles and after a bit of grinder and paint you'd never know That said, I've not had great luck with Si Bronze, better luck with Al-Bronze running AC, per Jody at "welding tips and tricks"

    Really great success on cast "mystery iron" with DC tig and ENi-99
    For cast steel, rather than cast iron, Rockmont "tartan-tig".

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    Quote Originally Posted by *D'B=6bk View Post
    I'm curious if anyone else has tried other methods on WWII-era Monarchs and what the results were.
    "So far".. not on either of my Monarch's. but NEW not repaired are "in the plan" (Tailstock & bustid-off ball-tips. "The usual"). Ditto two for the HBX-360-BC.

    Be it Monarch, or any of many others, any age or era, PM has PLENTY of lovely examples done by the highly skilled - or at least hard-headed DEDICATED - and also very patient - that look as good as new. Perhaps BETTER than new now and then.

    That said, I rate it lower as to predictably sound results for the effort involved than simply making new EITHER by:

    - Starting with store-bought stock wheels, cranks, and levers which are not all that hard to source nor modify. There are whole "industries" out there as have been making these "accessories" for machine-tool builders ever since "Big Bang" ...and still do.

    ELSE

    - Starting with "bare metal" AND NOT cast.

    Think it through.

    - The tolerances tend to be wide-open generous anywhere but the point of attachment. Strong enough. Not too small nor too large. Works. Looks OK.

    - So long as it DOES work, anything that also feels good and LOOKS good, IS "good".

    - Most ANY OTHER part a machinist is asked to make, life-long, for a customer is harder to do, DOES have to hit someone else's specs, and "all over".

    So "how hard can it be".. even if yah do a bit of milling.. or even blacksmithing.. to Wrought-Iron or anything "newer" be that mild steels, high-alloys, stainless, the Bronzes - even shiney-wood.. instead of trying to weld a bustid casting?

    They didn't weld bustid castings on small, inexpensive parts of this sort. They just cast new ones.

    That isn't all that hard EITHER when all yah need is the ONE. Easier to make a usable pattern out of it and pull for a mold than it is to weld it.

    Or carve a mold. Again - not a lot of precise fits involved.

    I did say "one"?
    Last edited by thermite; 06-18-2020 at 09:09 AM.

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    More common sense will never be uttered.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbeech View Post
    More common sense will never be uttered.
    Nothing SCARIER than what you just said has been so, far, either!

    And me in a house that doesn't even have a decent minefield laid around it?

    Now .. where TF did I stash my invisibility pills...???

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    I keep mine in the medicine chest.

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    Smaller filler would help. TIG welding is kind of counter intuitive in that running the machine at low amps and welding slowly actually heats the base metal up more than running at higher amps and moving faster. I would run 1/16 aluma bronze on AC as was suggested and set the machine at around 150amps. Of course my machine lives at 150 amps unless I am doing something really big, really small, or aluminum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbeech View Post
    I keep mine in the medicine chest.
    Prolly why I couldn't find mine. Mirror on the front of it.

    Ugly visage in it triggers mammalian eyelid diving reflex,

    The whole dam' WORLD goes invisible... and I ferget what I came after, sit down nearby, and take care of OTHER bizness I don't have to look up.

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    There you go, that's the problem. Take care of business first, then don't look in the mirror - unless - the whole house is gagging, in which case you may take a glimpse (with a bit of pride and a knowing grin) because an impressive load renders the mirror ineffective to the reptilian brain, which has primacy over the mammalian eyelid diving reflex. Remember, the brain is briefly immunized due to the stench but just in case, it's OK to breath through your mouth. Finally, and out of mere curiosity since you've admitted neglecting the minefields, have you established good fields of fire to compensate?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbeech View Post
    Finally, and out of mere curiosity since you've admitted neglecting the minefields, have you established good fields of fire to compensate?
    I surely did when it mattered. Put a thousand gallon of Diesel to work to torch 20 or 30 acres of fallow rice paddy grown up in more than one kind of grass - one of them GI sown clone of Acapulco Gold... (was told drug dealers put a price on my head over that move..)

    Got me a D9-G with angle blade and an operator who would run it 24 X 7 if you kept him in cold coca-cola.

    Sex maniac. Thought that Caterpiggle 'dozer was a WIFE!

    Dino threw up a textbook Vauban berm 12 feet deep with a Vauban trace in it, for my chunk of Long Binh's perimeter.

    Two days later a Command Helo sits down on the broad top of it, and Post Commander as "landlord" to the many Generals at USARV and MACV HQ on the rise back of me - Colonel Castle, WEARING castles as he was also Post Engineer .. steps out out with a huge SE grin to greet a younger brother.

    "I KNEW I'd find a another Combat Engineer here when this popped up!"
    He got regular updates of aerial photos, y'see.

    Busy man. I pointed out a village on the river towards Saigon, and the odd rocket or mortar round I figured was "ranging" USARV HQ so close, not the least bit "random" at all.

    Nod, glance. Said he'd look into it, and off he went.

    Couple of days later one of his staff calls me from Post HQ, said:

    "The Colonel took your advice on board, thought you might be interested as to how."

    "If you step outside just about now and look toward the river, you'll see how."

    "Binh Hoa didn't have what he wanted handy, so two fast-movers off a carrier just called feet dry."

    Sure enough, they entered a dive, pulled up into about eight iterations of a perfect loop in formation.

    Low point of each loop, ordnance was released. Last two, bombs all gone, they were emptying cannon so as not to waste fuel hauling ammo home.

    No more village. At all. Nor tunnels. Just mud. Deep. With a characteristic stench to come later.

    End of problem.

    Tet '68 hit? OUR side of Long Binh was QUIET as .. the grave. Formal or otherwise.

    Now? No need. Sweet, calm, easy living here.

    Good citizens FIRST, several native languages, Loudoun County Sheriff's Deputies, if not, see to it we have no need of worry.

    Good on 'em. Neighbours or helpers, both are about as good as it gets. Anywhere. Any time.

    And OUR community - comfortably "multi", SANE Democrat voting, and laid back about that as can be - surely does have the back of our Deputies.

    Not "cops". Family, rather.

    F**k ye not with that part. At all. More of that "family" ethic - politics not even relevant - at work in REAL America than the broken-city looter-lie-bore-alls and their Propaganda wing in the media could be made to believe.

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    When I ham fistedly broke the back gear selector fork, nice clean break, I just used silver solder with a propane torch. Not sure what grade but the iron has to be a dull red to melt it. The silver braze wicked beautifully into the break and on cleanup you could only just see the shiny joint line.

    The trickiest bit was fixturing the broken parts.

    10 years on it's still intact.

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    Earl Sigurd . . . proof its in the pudding, because 10-years on it's still working. Good tip on dull red and it wicks in. Hope I never find out for myself.

    thermite . . . you're older than me because they quit draft registration a few months before I turned 15. Dad served WWII, Korea, Vietnam and retired as Command Sergeant Major of the 193rd (Panama). I think my Mom voted for McGovern in '72 because of his position on ending the war. No surprise, she did 'not' want me in the military (I was ROTC in high school because I would have been proud to serve). College afterward, degree in engineering, marriage, etc. and only gained an interest in machining later in life. Took to it like a duck to water and will go to my grave believing nobody should graduate high school, much less college if they can't turn a bushing, frame a wall, lay a course of bricks, vacuum down a compressor and charge it, wire an electrical panel, troubleshoot a circuit, as well as solve quadratic equations, calculate a parabolic trajectory, plot its cousin, the catenary curve, compose a couplet, haiku, sing, and play an instrument, having a passing knowledge of the classics, do 100 pushups, swim a mile, handle small arms, and pass a foreign language exam. And the top 10% may apply for college. I vote Republican (paying quarterly taxes) and have not taken a nickle of CARES money. Add to it, I am perfectly willing for my property taxes to go up to fund better schools if these are the goals. What I hate politically, both sides, is the sheer waste of our human capital. If I managed my business the way government manages the human assets of this great nation I should be taken out back and flogged. Not with a wet noodle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbeech View Post
    Earl Sigurd . . . proof its in the pudding, because 10-years on it's still working. Good tip on dull red and it wicks in. Hope I never find out for myself.

    thermite . . . you're older than me because they quit draft registration a few months before I turned 15. Dad served WWII, Korea, Vietnam and retired as Command Sergeant Major of the 193rd (Panama). I think my Mom voted for McGovern in '72 because of his position on ending the war. No surprise, she did 'not' want me in the military (I was ROTC in high school because I would have been proud to serve). College afterward, degree in engineering, marriage, etc. and only gained an interest in machining later in life. Took to it like a duck to water and will go to my grave believing nobody should graduate high school, much less college if they can't turn a bushing, frame a wall, lay a course of bricks, vacuum down a compressor and charge it, wire an electrical panel, troubleshoot a circuit, as well as solve quadratic equations, calculate a parabolic trajectory, plot its cousin, the catenary curve, compose a couplet, haiku, sing, and play an instrument, having a passing knowledge of the classics, do 100 pushups, swim a mile, handle small arms, and pass a foreign language exam. And the top 10% may apply for college. I vote Republican (paying quarterly taxes) and have not taken a nickle of CARES money. Add to it, I am perfectly willing for my property taxes to go up to fund better schools if these are the goals. What I hate politically, both sides, is the sheer waste of our human capital. If I managed my business the way government manages the human assets of this great nation I should be taken out back and flogged. Not with a wet noodle.
    Yer a good man, JB.

    Add plan and execute an invasion, assist a mammalian female in delivering a healthy young 'un, and most of all?

    See to it your downline is easily as good at the bizness of "competent human being".

    Wasn't so blessed. Borrowed and shaped those of other parents. "For a grade" actually.

    Now? I have to settle for riling up at least ONE PM member to make a better go at it than "usual". Won't ever know if it worked at all.

    OTOH? I no longer NEED to know, do I?


  18. #16
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    I've learned one thing that applies to brazing Monarch cast parts: do not use flux-coated rod and expect it to do the job. I have had success using standard Victor general brazing borax flux, applied liberally. This is a yellow borax flux. I've had good luck brazing with silicon bronze rod, e.g. Uniweld 1800fc rod.

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    thermite . . . lots left off the list but you grok the concept, definitely.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbeech View Post
    thermite . . . lots left off the list but you grok the concept, definitely.
    AYE!

    Single most important key- early childhood, onward?

    Not being impaired with the "but you cannot!" burden.

    I kept a quote about the Corps of Engineers on the wall of my CP, 518th Engineers, Long Binh, RVN:

    "The scientists said that it couldn't be done, but the damned fool Engineer didn't know that - so he just went ahead and did it!" — General John J. Pershing.



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    . . . I'm going to type it up nicely in illustrator and print and laminate for my own wall.
    --
    A damn fool engineer

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbeech View Post
    . . . I'm going to type it up nicely in illustrator and print and laminate for my own wall.
    --
    A damn fool engineer
    LOL! I woz an Artilleryman before they sent me to Belvoir, actually wanted Ft. Sill and eventual command of a Battery of 8-inch SP HOW pee-bringers. Not allowed. Test score thing. Max it, Chief of Engineers owns yah.

    Look up some ready-made posters on the Army components, start with the "Artillery lends dignity..." poster..

    caricatures


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