Full tear down and Rebuild of a 10EE Round Dial - Page 7
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    Holy mother of post marathons!! Fantastic thread. Will take time to go through it. thanks for posting the whole process.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mllud22 View Post
    Once that was out, I was left with an oily mess.

    That oily mess has a way of working its way under the edge of a new paint job and pealing. I call it the creeping crud. It makes ugly edges
    Removing tags is sort of like wiping your butt. You cant see that crap under there but it sure feels good too get it cleaned out.


    The light colored paint in the lower compartment looks good
    Thanks for these wonderfully detailed posts. I’ve been off my project for a year which is a long bed 10ee. I’m glad I waited I have a lot more information and will be more successful with all this new information. . Btw I am using sherwin Williams two part epoxy.
    Did you have a gantry to lift the base or did you do it at ground level?
    Regards

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    Quote Originally Posted by mllud22 View Post

    That oily mess has a way of working its way under the edge of a new paint job and pealing. I call it the creeping crud. It makes ugly edges
    Removing tags is sort of like wiping your butt. You cant see that crap under there but it sure feels good too get it cleaned out.


    The light colored paint in the lower compartment looks good
    Thanks. I am glad I got that plate off to take care of that before all of that oil runes the upcoming exterior paint job.

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post

    Otherwise, there's no space for the Diesel-powered light towers.

    I like to save the Diesel for the truck. I prefer my 50lb, 1100WS flashes for lighting the darkest of things.

    Quote Originally Posted by Antarctica View Post
    Holy mother of post marathons!! Fantastic thread. Will take time to go through it. thanks for posting the whole process.
    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by SN3308 View Post
    Thanks for these wonderfully detailed posts. I’ve been off my project for a year which is a long bed 10ee. I’m glad I waited I have a lot more information and will be more successful with all this new information. . Btw I am using sherwin Williams two part epoxy.
    Did you have a gantry to lift the base or did you do it at ground level?
    Regards
    Thanks, I hope people find it useful. I am using a PPG automotive paint system for mine. I found PPG's guide for automotive restoration, really helpful for explaining all of the various steps and different types of paints, primers, etc. Are you talking about removed the bed from the base casting? If so, I used the same lifting strap I used with a forklift to unload the lathe from the trailer. This time, I didn't have the forklift, so used it with a engine hoist, I borrowed from a friend. It worked great, but will require and assistant when reinstalling to help line things up. A word of caution, mine had a thin shim under the tail stock end, so be on the lookout for those as they will need to go back in the same position when reinstalling.

    I spent a big chuck of time today, tapping off the inside of the casting. I used the yellow 3M automotive tape first around all of the edges. I then, taped painters paper behind each opening.
    tape1.jpg
    Next, I went back and used blue painters tape between the yellow 3M tape and the paper. Its probably overkill, but I dont want to take any chances with over spray on the freshly painted interior.
    tape2.jpg
    In hindsight, it may have been easier to paint the interior of the lathe last, but too late for that now.

    When working on smoothing out the casting, light is critical. I learned a long time ago when I got into shooting a lot of flash images, things become way more dramatic, when you can place light at perpendicular angles to what your are viewing, or better yet, fully back lit.
    131229201312299712.jpg
    So in order to better see what I am working with, I positioned my work lights to my left and right at either end of the lathe. This allows the light to rake across the surface, highlighting any areas that will need attention.
    light1.jpg
    When viewed without the raking light, those imperfections are really hard to see.
    light2.jpg


  6. #124
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    I then went to work, using very small amounts of Bondo at a time, only focusing on the deepest areas first.
    firstbondocoat.jpg
    I back scraped as much of the excess off as possible, and stoped as soon as I could feel it start to kick. I learned on the Bridgeport, less is more with the filler. Its seems more efficient to do multiple very thin coats slowly building up the low spots, as aposed to trying to sand down a ton of filler at once. I'm not an auto body guy, so no clue if thats the best approach, but it seems to work for me.

    For the sanding I used my small, Festool detail sander with 80 grit paper. It's really nice having the dust collection to help with the particles form the Bondo.
    sander.jpg
    Here is what it looked like after the first pass.
    sandedbondocoat1.jpg
    I then did a second coat of Bondo, once again only focusing on the lowest areas. I would have sanded that today, as well, but ran out of paper. I could have sworn I had another box in storage. Tomorrow I will probably do one more pass once again focusing on the lowest areas, before attempting to do a skim coat and starting to work on correcting the panels for flatness with the longer elbow grease Mirka sanding block I ordered. The Mirka is 2.75x7.75 inches, so I hope its long enough to get consistent flat results. I thought about ordering the 16" one, but figured that would probably be too long to be useful on a lot of the lathe. I guess we will see.
    mirkasander.jpg


  7. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantGunderson View Post
    I then went to work, using very small amounts of Bondo at a time, only focusing on the deepest areas first.
    firstbondocoat.jpg
    I back scraped as much of the excess off as possible, and stoped as soon as I could feel it start to kick. I learned on the Bridgeport, less is more with the filler. Its seems more efficient to do multiple very thin coats slowly building up the low spots, as aposed to trying to sand down a ton of filler at once. I'm not an auto body guy, so no clue if thats the best approach, but it seems to work for me.

    For the sanding I used my small, Festool detail sander with 80 grit paper. It's really nice having the dust collection to help with the particles form the Bondo.
    sander.jpg
    Here is what it looked like after the first pass.
    sandedbondocoat1.jpg
    I then did a second coat of Bondo, once again only focusing on the lowest areas. I would have sanded that today, as well, but ran out of paper. I could have sworn I had another box in storage. Tomorrow I will probably do one more pass once again focusing on the lowest areas, before attempting to do a skim coat and starting to work on correcting the panels for flatness with the longer elbow grease Mirka sanding block I ordered. The Mirka is 2.75x7.75 inches, so I hope its long enough to get consistent flat results. I thought about ordering the 16" one, but figured that would probably be too long to be useful on a lot of the lathe. I guess we will see.
    mirkasander.jpg

    The Round Dial lathe has a lot more solid open surface area to sand. On the square dial base there are two doors on the front.
    That's a good approach by using thin coats. That flat hand sander looks to be a good quality with a large surface area.

    Dust is an issue with body filler. I place a fan to one side of what I'm sanding and blow the dust away from the workpiece ,and my face. Open a window on the other side of the room too draw fresh air in.. Blow it out the door if its available. Still wear a mask.

    Those reciprocating pneumatic sanders travel back and forth less than an inch. There is a large enough surface area there to use one. You can have have half the sander out past the end. The length doesn't keep you from sculpting. I tilt it on edge in a radiused area. If you don't do much work with fillers it wouldn't be practical.
    Tools that vacuum the dust are the way to go.
    You can knock the filler down close with the orbital sander then hand block it flat with your hand sander.

    The unhealthy aspects of bodywork drove me away from it. Unfortunately it's the only way too finish off metal. I mostly just refinish machinery now when needed

    Your doing a great job on your lathe. If you carry on with your informative posts through the reassembly this will be a good reference thread for anyone seeking information.

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  9. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by mllud22 View Post
    . . .
    Your doing a great job on your lathe. If you carry on with your informative posts through the reassembly this will be a good reference thread for anyone seeking information.
    Amen. Grant, I don't have words to describe my respect for your talents and skills. The photos, descriptions, and the fact that you can touch type! I started to compile a set of notes to links, now I'm wondering if there's any value to it. I think you answered a question I just posted about. Now to go see what if any differences there are on my square dial.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mllud22 View Post
    Dust is an issue with body filler. I place a fan to one side of what I'm sanding and blow the dust away from the workpiece ,and my face. Open a window on the other side of the room too draw fresh air in.. Blow it out the door if its available. Still wear a mask.

    Those reciprocating pneumatic sanders travel back and forth less than an inch. There is a large enough surface area there to use one. You can have have half the sander out past the end. The length doesn't keep you from sculpting. I tilt it on edge in a radiused area. If you don't do much work with fillers it wouldn't be practical.
    Tools that vacuum the dust are the way to go.
    You can knock the filler down close with the orbital sander then hand block it flat with your hand sander.

    The unhealthy aspects of bodywork drove me away from it. Unfortunately it's the only way too finish off metal. I mostly just refinish machinery now when needed

    Your doing a great job on your lathe. If you carry on with your informative posts through the reassembly this will be a good reference thread for anyone seeking information.
    I'm very grateful that I have the Festool sander system and Dust collectors. One the years, im my mind they have paid for themselves in providing a rather dust free work environment that is not only cleaner, but safer. The dust collectors, also just so happen to be great shop vacs too!

    A lotto the chemicals involved in Plastics and Composites, are big portion of why I never used my degree. After 7 years of school, I learned enough to know that exposure all of those chemicals are best minimized as much as possible... that and it was way more fun too shoot ski photos for a living and it just so happened to paid better too. I dont know if that last part is still true, but the quality of life is great.

    I do plan to keep the posts going threw through the reassembly, but I am fast approaching my busy work season. That usually happens first of Dec, but could start as early as November. Once I go back to work for the winter, I am pretty much travel full time until end of April, so there will be a big lag in finishing the project. So the rush is on to get as much done now as possible.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shiseiji View Post
    Amen. Grant, I don't have words to describe my respect for your talents and skills. The photos, descriptions, and the fact that you can touch type! I started to compile a set of notes to links, now I'm wondering if there's any value to it. I think you answered a question I just posted about. Now to go see what if any differences there are on my square dial.
    Thanks, None of what I am doing is anything new to this forum. All of this information and then some (a lot) is already here. I am just trying to put what I did, in order, and all in one spot, so it's a bit easier for find for the next guy. Maybe someone can do something similar with the square dials.
    I'm also sure there are better ways of doing things, so its nice when other's can chime in with advice too!

    I also should mention, typing isn't one of my stronger skills, that combined with mostly working on the lathe after the family goes to bed at night results in lots of typos. So hopefully the general ideas all come across clear.

  11. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantGunderson View Post
    Thanks. I am glad I got that plate off to take care of that before all of that oil runes the upcoming exterior paint job.


    I like to save the Diesel for the truck. I prefer my 50lb, 1100WS flashes for lighting the darkest of things.


    Thanks!



    Thanks, I hope people find it useful. I am using a PPG automotive paint system for mine. I found PPG's guide for automotive restoration, really helpful for explaining all of the various steps and different types of paints, primers, etc. Are you talking about removed the bed from the base casting? If so, I used the same lifting strap I used with a forklift to unload the lathe from the trailer. This time, I didn't have the forklift, so used it with a engine hoist, I borrowed from a friend. It worked great, but will require and assistant when reinstalling to help line things up. A word of caution, mine had a thin shim under the tail stock end, so be on the lookout for those as they will need to go back in the same position when reinstalling.

    I spent a big chuck of time today, tapping off the inside of the casting. I used the yellow 3M automotive tape first around all of the edges. I then, taped painters paper behind each opening.
    tape1.jpg
    Next, I went back and used blue painters tape between the yellow 3M tape and the paper. Its probably overkill, but I dont want to take any chances with over spray on the freshly painted interior.
    tape2.jpg
    In hindsight, it may have been easier to paint the interior of the lathe last, but too late for that now.

    When working on smoothing out the casting, light is critical. I learned a long time ago when I got into shooting a lot of flash images, things become way more dramatic, when you can place light at perpendicular angles to what your are viewing, or better yet, fully back lit.
    131229201312299712.jpg
    So in order to better see what I am working with, I positioned my work lights to my left and right at either end of the lathe. This allows the light to rake across the surface, highlighting any areas that will need attention.
    light1.jpg
    When viewed without the raking light, those imperfections are really hard to see.
    light2.jpg

    Grant
    Regarding your question about removing the lathe from the base. I wasn’t going to do half the things I already did. After looking at your thread it looks like the way to go. Can I ‘simply’ lift the lathe off the base? What does it take to realign on assembly? My base is already empty As everything has been removed . I am using a 5hp Balfour inverter duty motor with tach and a Fuji vfd. Am trying also to decide if I want to tackle the gearbox reattachment or not.
    My biggest obstacle is working on the ground. I wish I had a lift to get the base at a better height.

  12. #129
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    Great work Grant - I look forward to seeing more of as the season permits. Keep it up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SN3308 View Post
    Grant
    Regarding your question about removing the lathe from the base. I wasn’t going to do half the things I already did. After looking at your thread it looks like the way to go. Can I ‘simply’ lift the lathe off the base? What does it take to realign on assembly? My base is already empty As everything has been removed . I am using a 5hp Balfour inverter duty motor with tach and a Fuji vfd. Am trying also to decide if I want to tackle the gearbox reattachment or not.
    My biggest obstacle is working on the ground. I wish I had a lift to get the base at a better height.
    The 10EE is of a modular design, however, certain modules need to be removed in order to access the next. You may be able to remove the bed with the gear box and head attached if you removed the end gear and the various parts associated with it, such as the Tumbler shaft and Feed shaft bearing assembly. Cal and the like would know more. However it would be very heavy, awkward and hard to balance doing it that way, so best to remove all of the modules in order.

    The bed simply bolts to the base with 6 bolts. Its alignment to the base isn't critical other than maintaining the factory shims, so it sets flush and even. The critical part is the head stock alignment to the bed, but that is done by two alignment pins. In reality as long as its close, adjusting the tailstock will get you dialed in, but once again, Cal or the like would know more.

    I have the lathe at ground level. I suspect a good quality motorcycle lift would lift it. The gear box wast not hard to remove once the end gear train was removed.
    it is heavy but manageable. The head stock on the other hand will require two strong guys to lift off. I hope that helps.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mickey_D View Post
    Great work Grant - I look forward to seeing more of as the season permits. Keep it up.
    Thanks! We all see how far I make it before I am back to work for the winter months.

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    I apologize if you have stated this this in an earlier post, but what was the condition of the ways? Spindle bearings? I too, am a fan of PPG products. Expensive, but they have never done me wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by daryl bane View Post
    I apologize if you have stated this this in an earlier post, but what was the condition of the ways? Spindle bearings? I too, am a fan of PPG products. Expensive, but they have never done me wrong.
    The ways seem to be in very good condition. No factory flaking on them, but they appear to be in quite good shape otherwise. I assume I would need some sort of a true bar chucked in the spindle to really evaluate them with an indicator, but there is nothing that appears alarming.

    Spindle bearing seem fine too. It appears they have been replaced at some point. Give how expensive replacements for those are, I am planing on leaving the spindle alone as I do not want to damaged those bearings attempting to remove them. When I bought lathe, I put my 1/1000's indicator on it, and had zero movement, so I'm sure it will be more accurate than my skills. I'm also not going to be building aerospace parts with it either, so for most of my stuff, its going to be more than overkill.

    So far the only major worn item is the lead screw. It is probably serviceable, but in reality would be best to replace if I can source one for a reasonable price. Ideally it would be great to find a used one in good shape before spending $$$ on a new replacement.

    The PPG products are very, very good, but also expensive. Do to the amount of work involved in tearing it all down, I dont mind spending a bit more on paint to ensure its done correctly and that I dont have to do it again in my lifetime. I figure doing a proper tear down, cleaning / bearing replacement as needed, the next time the lathe would need significant service, it would be my future grandkids generation, and I won't be around to worry about it.

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    daryls-headstock-001.jpg124-2413_img.jpgI suggest you get a test bar as you have removed the ways and headstock. Just because you haven't altered anything does not necessarily mean they will go back in perfect alignment. It will also give you a good indication as to condition/accuracy of the ways and carriage. The ways on a EE were hardened and ground and there was no flaking. My ways looked nice and shiny but for a .010+ dip up near the headstock. I included a Inspection test sheet but I can't figure out how to make it readable.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails monarchee.jpg  

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    It sounds like you have a tight lathe

    The test bar will tell where alignment is at after reassembly.
    If you want too see an indication of how much wear you have on a 10ee the [ways ]don't show much by looking. Usually

    The carriage and the tailstock are not hardened and have hand flaking. Taking a good look at those may give you an idea of how much wear you have. If those show uneven or no flaking left on TS and carriage the head stock may not be what's out of alignment.

    I dont know if this was discussed earlier in the thread. If so I apologize also
    You still need to set it up with a test bar to get an idea of what you have.
    There are a lot of threads and u-tube videos on this subject.
    I don't know enough about what method is best too recommend a particular thread or method.

    Maybe someone can advise. Aa good thread

    There is a lot of arguing is some threads on the subject. They don't help much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by daryl bane View Post
    I suggest you get a test bar as you have removed the ways and headstock. Just because you haven't altered anything does not necessarily mean they will go back in perfect alignment. It will also give you a good indication as to condition/accuracy of the ways and carriage. The ways on a EE were hardened and ground and there was no flaking. My ways looked nice and shiny but for a .010+ dip up near the headstock. I included a Inspection test sheet but I can't figure out how to make it readable.
    Thanks for the advice. I'll keep an eye out for a test bar. Hopefully I can source one reasonably, once I get closer to re-installing everything.
    Quote Originally Posted by mllud22 View Post
    It sounds like you have a tight lathe

    The test bar will tell where alignment is at after reassembly.
    If you want too see an indication of how much wear you have on a 10ee the [ways ]don't show much by looking. Usually

    The carriage and the tailstock are not hardened and have hand flaking. Taking a good look at those may give you an idea of how much wear you have. If those show uneven or no flaking left on TS and carriage the head stock may not be what's out of alignment.

    I dont know if this was discussed earlier in the thread. If so I apologize also
    You still need to set it up with a test bar to get an idea of what you have.
    There are a lot of threads and u-tube videos on this subject.
    I don't know enough about what method is best too recommend a particular thread or method.

    Maybe someone can advise. Aa good thread

    There is a lot of arguing is some threads on the subject. They don't help much.
    I need to clean the surfaces up on the carriage to see. The tail stock doesn't appear to have any flaking left... so hopefully not too much wear. At the end of the day, I dont have the skills or tools to scrape it myself The cost to have the bed reground is out of the budget. So I will have to live with where its at. Chances are, my skill set will not be adequate enough for quite some time to notice it. Once I become proficient enough with the machine, and if I can justify the costs down the road, its always something that I can re-visit. My Bridgeport has minimal factory scraping left on it. Once I rebuilt it, replaced the nuts on the screws and installed a modern DRO, its served me well and has still produced parts that are far more accurate than my needs.

    On another note, I got my brushes and way wipers ordered from Monarch this am. Here are all of the part numbers:
    (4) R-1017 motor brushes $15.00 ea. – in stock
    (4) R-1019 generator brushes $6.00 ea. – in stock
    (4) R-1021 exciter brushes $3.00 ea. – in stock
    (6) EE-1845 lower wipers $3.50 ea. – in stock
    (6) EE-1403 flat wipers $4.00 ea. – in stock
    (2) EE-1431 vee wipers $4.50 ea. – in stock
    (2) EE-1685 vee wipers $5.15 ea. – in stock
    (1) EE-2033 bottom slide wiper $7.50 ea. – in stock
    (1) EE-1369 spindle wiper $6.00 ea. – in stock


    They also provided me with the original build sheet for the lathe.
    211014.jpg
    I do not have the tapper attachment for it. IF I am reading this correctly, it didn't come with one.

    I do not know what the aligners parts and testers parts are that the specified on the build sheet.

    I believe I have everything else they listed on that sheet, including the tool cabinet.
    Last edited by GrantGunderson; 10-14-2021 at 11:47 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantGunderson View Post
    ...
    On another note, I got my brushes and way wipers ordered from Monarch this am. Here are all of the part numbers:
    (4) R-1017 motor brushes $15.00 ea. – in stock
    (4) R-1019 generator brushes $6.00 ea. – in stock
    (4) R-1021 exciter brushes $3.00 ea. – in stock
    (6) EE-1845 lower wipers $3.50 ea. – in stock
    (6) EE-1403 flat wipers $4.00 ea. – in stock
    (2) EE-1431 vee wipers $4.50 ea. – in stock
    (2) EE-1685 vee wipers $5.15 ea. – in stock
    (1) EE-2033 bottom slide wiper $7.50 ea. – in stock
    (1) EE-1369 spindle wiper $6.00 ea. – in stock


    They also provided me with the original build sheet for the lathe.
    211014.jpg
    ...

    I believe I have everything else they listed on that sheet, including the tool cabinet.
    I hope you have better luck that I did. Most of the wipers are they sent me would not fit. Here's what I bought:
    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    ...

    Here’s what Monarch sent me:
    • (2) EE-2420 shoe wiper $4.14 ea.
    • (4) EE-1558 slide wiper $11.30 ea.
    • (6) EE-1845 L wiper $2.00 ea.
    • (1) EE-1369 spindle wiper $6.00 ea.
    • (2) EE-1403 tail flat wiper $4.00 ea.
    • (2) EE-1685 tail vee wiper $4.75 ea.
    • (1) EE-2033 btm slide wiper $7.50 ea.
    • (1) EE-2917 wiper $4.35 ea.

    ...
    I wound up sending back everything but the tailstock spindle wiper and the cross-slide wiper. I wound up making my on wipers for everything else using F1 felt from McMaster-Carr. It's interesting to note that most of the prices are still the same as they were back in aught eight.

    Check the backs of your chucks and the bottoms of your rests. Monarch stamped the serial number of the lathe on tooling that they supplied. Also, I hope you realize what an extremely rare thing it is to get a 10EE with original tooling cabinet and tooling. You really want to hang on the the tooling cabinet (you said earlier that your weren't sure about that).

    Cal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    I hope you have better luck that I did. Most of the wipers are they sent me would not fit. Here's what I bought:

    I wound up sending back everything but the tailstock spindle wiper and the cross-slide wiper. I wound up making my on wipers for everything else using F1 felt from McMaster-Carr. It's interesting to note that most of the prices are still the same as they were back in aught eight.

    Check the backs of your chucks and the bottoms of your rests. Monarch stamped the serial number of the lathe on tooling that they supplied. Also, I hope you realize what an extremely rare thing it is to get a 10EE with original tooling cabinet and tooling. You really want to hang on the the tooling cabinet (you said earlier that your weren't sure about that).

    Cal
    Fingers crossed they fit. When I ordered them, I simply gave them the EE number off of the machine and told them I needed all of the felt wipers for it. Seems like many of them have different numbers then the batch you got, so hopefully they are correct!

    I thought about ordering felt from McMaster, but figured by the time it took me to cut all of them, it was probably worth it to order them.So hopefully I dont have to custom cut all of them!

    I did notice when I first got the lathe home all of the accessories, rests and chucks all had EE numbers that matched the machine. I'll take photos of those once I get them back out of storage.

    I'm still not 100% sure what I will do with the tool cabinet yet. The collet carousel is quite nice, but the rest of the cabinet has seen better days. At the minimum I'll need to find a way to take the twist out of the hinge, and I am just not sure how I will accomplish that yet. I also dont really have a lot of spare room for it. Once the lathe is ready for its final resting place. I will need to re-arainge my shop cabinets to fit it. So who knows maybe I'll just redo all of those cabinets and build something custom to fit the original Monarch cabinet. I custom built all of my cabinets and the ones on that side of the garage where the first ones I made, before building them for the rest of the house. So like most things I have ideas on how to improve them next time, but need to find a way to justify the costs to my self or more importantly my wife. Anyways that will be a next summer project at the earliest.

    I've spent most of the week working on applying body filler to the base. I feel working with Bondo its often two steps forward, one step back. So not a lot to show despite a ton of time on it. Hopefully if I get a chance this weekend, I can do one more application and sand of the Bondo to get the last of the low spots leveled. I will then re-spray it with the two part epoxy primer, and sand again. I am sure that will then show me a few more spots that will need more work before I move on the the high-build primer. I picked up the high-build primer, sealer, color coat and the clear top coats from the auto body store today. I think I now have more into the paint than I do the lathe its self. In reality I think the single stage poly I used on the interior would have been more than adequate for the entire lathe and way easier to touch up latter. My justification for the more elaborate paint was to prove to my self I could do it, and secondly give me confidence in using those paint systems on other projects in the future...maybe building a custom e-bike, I don't know. Back in college I only had one class in finishing systems, and that mostly focused on powder coating, which I though was a bit of a waste of time back then as it wasn't to applicable to plastic or composite parts.

    Once the main casting and bed are done, the tail and head stocks, will hopefully be the end of the most critical pieces for body work prior to paint. After that the rest should hopefully go quite a bit quicker, and I can get back to more enjoyable things such as working on the mechanics of the lathe.

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    After the better part of the week applying Bondo, sanding, then applying more, I think I got the castings mostly corrected. That felt like a never ending job! I used a Sharpe marker to help me identify the low areas for each Bondo coat after sanding. That helped a lot!
    finalbondo1.jpg
    finalbondo2.jpgfinalbondo3.jpg

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    In a few areas, I had to build it up quite a bit to make everything flush and smooth.
    buriedholes.jpg
    In order to find the bolts holes that I buried in the filler, I aligned the various plates with the known holes, and then used an alignment punch to find the centers of the missing holes.
    buriedholes2.jpg
    Once that was done, it was simply a matter of chucking a counter sink in the drill and exposing the factory bolt holes. That works really slick, as long as you are close to the factory hole, it automatically aligns it's self with the centers.

    I could then finally spray a "guide coat" of two part epoxy primer.
    blackprimerguidecoat.jpg
    It amazing how all of the filler areas show threw with it. I will let it cure over night with the garage heater on. In the am, I will sand it with 180, and then add more filler to any low areas. If you have ever owned a black vehicle, you will understand the advantage of using black primer for this... It will show every defect! Once that is done, it will get a sand with 220, and then the next step will be the high-build primer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantGunderson View Post
    After the better part of the week applying Bondo, sanding, then applying more, I think I got the castings mostly corrected. That felt like a never ending job! I used a Sharpe marker to help me identify the low areas for each Bondo coat after sanding. That helped a lot!
    I think some of the dust is drifting down here to Salt Lake.


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