Gearbox rebuild
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Gearbox rebuild

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    dallas,tx
    Posts
    2,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    790
    Likes (Received)
    590

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Regina, Canada
    Posts
    2,638
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    122

    Default

    Major undertaking, why did you think it necessary? BTW how did you get those twist lock pins out of all the "labels" and where did you get replacements?

    Bob

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    429
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Daryl,
    Very Nice!!
    What did you use for the internal coating, the white stuff?
    Also what type of exterior paint did you use?
    Thanks for posting the pics of the gearbox and others,
    Steve

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bergen, NJ.
    Posts
    444
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    This separates the men from the boys. How long did it take you to accomplish such a feat. Are those knobs Monarch's? They look great. Congrat.
    Khanh

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    dallas,tx
    Posts
    2,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    790
    Likes (Received)
    590

    Default

    I originally bought the machine, to do a full restoration. I have always dreamed of having a "new" EE. This EE was used very hard but well taken care of, but just wore out. Going through the gearbox and replacing all bearings,seals,bushes,gaskets is, for me, just doing a proper job. The interior paint was suggested by Forrest, its that 2- part epoxy porcelain repair paint you get at the home repair stores. Great stuff and seemingly impervious to anything. The knobs I made out of s/s steel, because the originals were all banged up, and at $200 ea. from Monarch!!!
    I made the whole set for all the covers etc, so they would all match.
    The exterior primer is a epoxy by Ditzler DP-40 and will be topcoated with acyrlic enamel.
    It probably took about a month or more to do it, but that was because I was working in spurts. It helps to have the casting boiled in stripper, otherwise its a huge mess to clean. The alum tags drive rivets can be removed by cutting a screwdriver slot with a Dremel and turning it out like a screw. The drive rivet has a clockwise thread like a woodscrew. Thanks for the kind words and theres more to come. I redid the headstock and will post those also. There are a couple of things about the gearbox that should be mentioned. Even though the machine was used hard with alot of miles, because of the quality and heftiness of the gears, the wear on the teeth of the gears was negligible, in fact after bead blasting,I couldn't see or measure any wear at all. A testament to a fine machine.
    When installing all of those shafts and bearings back into the box, note that there are no bearing mounting shoulders to simplfy bearing installation and/or alignment of the gears.
    This you have to do by feel and sight. You have to install the bearings and endplugs so that endplay is nil but not tight. All shafts should spin freely. When its all together, you should be able to spin thru all the gears
    easily by hand. I do not believe this at the factory was a "assembly line" job, too much hand fitting. At least for me it was.

    [This message has been edited by daryl bane (edited 08-09-2004).]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    5,639
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    833

    Default

    Wow, that gearbox casting is complex with alot of machine work done to it!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Salinas, CA USA
    Posts
    4,846
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    540
    Likes (Received)
    447

    Default

    I did the same kind of rebuild on a round dial gearbox, and replaced all the bearings except for a couple of obsolete ND bearings that were only available at ridiculous prices. For those I improvised, took a stock bearing and machined a circlip groove on the exterior! My carbide tooling lasted about 30 seconds.

    The bearing preloads were all set by feel, as you say, and then locked in place with an endplate that uses a setscrew or two in the outside bore. That gearbox is sitting waiting for the bed to get ground on the 42.
    Too many projects, too little time.

    Dave

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Holland, MI, USA
    Posts
    108
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    "The interior paint was suggested by Forrest, its that 2- part epoxy porcelain repair paint you get at the home repair stores"

    I have search the forum and home stores and can not paint like this. What is the name and part number please.
    I did fine tub and tile paint put is say not for constant immersion.

    Bruce

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    dallas,tx
    Posts
    2,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    790
    Likes (Received)
    590

    Default

    It is made under the name of Klenk's Porcelain sink and tub epoxy. It may say anything to cover their ass, but it works in oil just fine, but I would let it set up for a week or longer.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Iowa
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    Admiring your work on repainting the interior of the gearbox and the headstock from your other post. So inspirational I decided I should give it a go during my own rebuild as well.

    Anyone got any tips on how best to apply paint in the closed quarters of the casting interiors? The headstock especially I can see is going to be a real pain to apply any coating without dipping or the likes.

    Along the theme of hard to reach, any advice for masking some of the more hidden bores inside these castings?

    Thanks,
    -Paul

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    dallas,tx
    Posts
    2,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    790
    Likes (Received)
    590

    Default

    Do it with brushes and mirrors. I use those little acid brushes, and you can bend them to get up under lips of castings, and make extensions from wood dowels. Then take a mirror on a stick( you can get these..or could in autoparts stores) and a flashlight. I keep a clean paper towels ,actually Kimwipes with lacquer thinner and wipe out the paint from bores that are hard to mask. I remove the masking before the paint has set up and clean up overspray with the lacquer thinner. Long 6" q-tips are useful also.

  12. Likes Paul R liked this post
  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Iowa
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    That’s great! Already have all those supplies on hand. Guess all I was missing was the ingenuity to bring all together into a “hard to access” paint system.

  14. Likes daryl bane liked this post
  15. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Benicia California USA
    Posts
    8,840
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2332
    Likes (Received)
    3261

    Default

    The coating choice is a big question.....
    Not much lives when submerged in oil. Also difficult to get the old oil out of the pores of the casting.

    Insulating varnish used to be the "Go TO" for painting the inside of engine blocks (only if its iron) ...
    GE made the stuff and marked under the trade name of "Glyptal"
    Not sure that the stuff is the same today..Pretty sure that GE no longer produces it...spun off to another source.

    That coating that Daryl used AFAIK is no longer made...Might be some somewhere as new old stock, if you can get someone to sell it to you...Has some serious health and environmental problems
    and that is why its no longer available ....
    I found a "kit" some years back, but the darn stuff leaked (the base material) from the can and was hell to clean up in my tool cabinet even being unhardened.

    Cheers Ross

  16. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    dallas,tx
    Posts
    2,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    790
    Likes (Received)
    590

    Default

    Well that is a bummer. The Monarch was done with the Klenks brand bought at Home Depot, back in 2003? And yes it is gone. I went to a small local hardware store about 5 + or more years ago and they had Rustoleum brand two part Tub and Tile epoxy kit and I have been using that recently on a Harig grinder project. Seemed identical to the Klenks. Next time I am over at that hardware store, I'll see if it is still carried. This is Texas and they seem to be one of the last states to ban harmful stuff. I just went and looked online, and it seems the Rustoleum 2 part is available. I would try it on a test piece, let it dry for a few days or week and then submerge in oil and see if it holds up. I know the old Klenks is still hard (finger nail test) after almost 20 yrs in oil. The original paint Monarch used was very soft and I could pick/wipe it off easily. Something else, I took the stripped headstock, gearbox, ways, base, over to a rusty car stripping place (now closed per EPA) and they boiled them in caustic chemicals. Came out like fresh clean castings. A joy to paint, (not really) but I never had any paint adhesion problems. Your results my vary.

  17. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Iowa
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    I found Daryls original Klenks product to be unavailable as well. Best modern equivalent I could find was from Sherwin Williams, a two part tub & tile epoxy enamel (see link). I haven’t tested it submerged in oil yet but I have a test piece 4 weeks cured. It’s rock hard now and looks like a bathroom sink. Seems like it should work great but I’ll let a test soak do the real talking. I’ll post back here with the results for any other future readers benefits.

    Tub & Tile Ultra Repair Finish 2-Part Epoxy Enamel - | Krylon

    I never even consider the Glyptal product. I wasn’t even aware of it until just now. Though I have found a red primer coat in various places around the machine under 80 years of recoats. No red inside the gearboxes though, found a whitish coating in there. Taking a guess, but I believe that red base coat is probably said Glyptal. No amount of paint stripper, pressure washing or even light abrasive blasting seems to phase it so I can vouch for its robustness.
    Last edited by Paul R; 08-30-2021 at 11:50 PM. Reason: Glyptal misspelling

  18. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    dallas,tx
    Posts
    2,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    790
    Likes (Received)
    590

    Default

    I just like the white coating over the red, it just looks cleaner to me.

  19. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Salinas, CA USA
    Posts
    4,846
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    540
    Likes (Received)
    447

    Default

    Other than appearance, what is the advantage of painting a cast iron casting on the inside, if it will be submerged in oil?

  20. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SLC, UT
    Posts
    808
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1177
    Likes (Received)
    219

    Default

    Believe that historically, this was done to capture any possible residual blasting media and also help keep the casting from potentially leaking oil.
    The lighter colored interiors definitely make it easier to see inside during assembly and maintenance also.

  21. Likes daryl bane, rimcanyon liked this post
  22. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    dallas,tx
    Posts
    2,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    790
    Likes (Received)
    590

    Default

    Seems all of my lathes originally have the insides painted, even the Chinese Enco.

  23. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,208
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1000
    Likes (Received)
    406

    Default

    Glyptal 1201 Paint - The Eastwood Company

    This is made specifically for that purpose. Google Glyptal for more information on that family of products.

    Glyptal - Bing

    Ross had the right brand name


    More. Glyptal on practical machinist - Bing


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •