Metric 1976 10EE Monarch
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  1. #1
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    Default Metric 1976 10EE Monarch

    A buddy of mine just acquired this 10EE. Made in 1976, serial 45906-R. What's interesting is it's all Metric! Anyone see such a beast before? First one for me, and I'm rather impressed with the number of parts are are metric-specific...

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    I thought that late of production would have a single sight glass

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    There has been "metric only" 10ee lathes on the forum in the past.
    This machine appears to be an older style, close to ten years older then 1976. But, it certainly is an example of the company building the machines to order.
    The factory should have record of it.

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    According to the Monarch serial numbers available via the top "sticky" this was built circa 1961-62. Issues with these serial numbers have been raised, including by John Legge. I've not found them to be wildly off. My understanding is that Monarch adds an "R" after the s/n when they do a rebuild. My hunch then is this was rebuilt by them in 1976.

    As donie says "metric only" 10EE's have been reported here before. Many years ago Ole Steen (in Norway) reported having one, he eventually sold it.
    David

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    My 1976 10EE is serial number 51832, as mentioned that is an older machine rebuilt in 76'

    The interesting thing about that machine is it has a gov contract number, first "newer" metric only lathe with government origins?

    Steve

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    I remember the US "tried" to go metric about 1976...

    Metric Conversion Act - Wikipedia

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    Thanks for all the insights into this!

    >> I thought that late of production would have a single sight glass

    Yep. The 80's machine here has one sight glass, and all the 60's machines have 3 on the headstock.

    >> This machine appears to be an older style, close to ten years older then 1976.

    >> According to the Monarch serial numbers available via the top "sticky" this was built circa 1961-62.
    >> ... Monarch adds an "R" after the s/n when they do a rebuild. My hunch then is this was rebuilt by them in 1976.

    I agree. This is looking like a 60's machine that was rebuilt by Monarch in 1976. Be interesting to know if that's when it was transformed into a metric machine.

    >> The interesting thing about that machine is it has a gov contract number, first "newer" metric only lathe with government origins?

    I saw the government contract number on the tag and was pondering as to the significance... The entire serial number tag appears newer (as well as the monarch logo on the front). Seems those were updated during the rebuild. We really should check with Monarch see what the ownership and rebuild history is on this.

    >> I remember the US "tried" to go metric about 1976...
    >> Metric Conversion Act - Wikipedia

    This maybe the answer as to how this machine came to exist LOL...I could just see someone at a government institution taking this Metric Conversion Act as reason enough to send the ole Monarch back to the factory for a rebuild and swap to Metric! Be interesting to find out for sure....

    Thanks,
    Alex.

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    Well Monarch started to sell the inch/metric EE's in 76.

    Steve

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    I wonder if Monarch upgraded the drive from Wiad to modular while they were at it. Looks like the machine has the smaller tailstock quill.

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    The drive was originally modular, but, it may have been updated to the later modular lay out. The last configuration used Square D switches, and had a replacement for the OSD relay.
    On machines with the later style modular drive, the "Monarch" logo plate on the right hand electrical compartment door is "red" instead of "black". The difference with the later drive is a little faster switching, and a more reliable OSD relay "the big coil" in the right hand compartment is replaced with a unit mounted on a board.

    Another unusual thing about this machine is, no "Electric Lead Screw Reverse", as the threading dial can not be "normally used". The ELSR would make it easier for most operators to cut threads with the machine.
    However, some more experienced with thread cutting operators might find the ELSR cumbersome to use, and prefer the more positive standard headstock switch and using quick reflexes become the ELSR themselves. Of coarse, I am referring to mostly having to thread leaving the half nuts engaged, and depending on the machines dynamic braking for stopping and returning the carriage.
    There could, or should be, a chart showing the change gears needed to cut English threads located behind the lower left hand cover, the same transposing gears are used as to convert english machines to metric.

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