Model A carriage parts
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  1. #1
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    Question Model A carriage parts

    I have a Model A at work I was going to rebuild for a winter project. we only really use it for turning nylon bushings for some equipment. the carriage has a lot of play in the gibs is there a source still for those? it doesn't have a serial number it has a lot number of 243 No. 1

    Any help would be great thanks.

    20191029_132254.jpg20191029_133148.jpg

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    is there a source still for those?
    Probably not. I got used to the idea long ago that 75 to 125 year olds needing fixed just meant I had to make the parts - or find a exact donor machine

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    If there is so much wear that the gib at full adjustment does not reduce the clearance to zero, then either make or have made a new, thicker gib..
    Or, as I found on a very worn lathe: take a 12" long feeler gauge and put in beside the gib to take up the wear. It sounds like a 'hack' way to accomplish reducing the clearance. BUT, it must be a well worn machine, so unless you are going to go through the time and expense of regrinding the ways, the dovetail on the saddle and compound etc, then take up the clearance with a hard shim: aka: feeler gauge stock..
    You can take normal length feeler gauges and try various thicknesses until you find one that will work then buy a full length piece of feeler gauge stock. Most tool retailers have individual 12" feeler gauge in various thicknesses, and I know feeler gauge stock can be bought by the roll, I have .005" and .010" in a roll. I'm surprised how often I use the material as shim stock.

    DualValve

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Probably not. I got used to the idea long ago that 75 to 125 year olds needing fixed just meant I had to make the parts - or find a exact donor machine
    I think they call those "stem cells", John?

    Good system, if not quite perfect, doesn't seem to work for teeth nor tubular goods for example.

    I've not seen it on a lathe - not even a Monarch. Some things yah just hafta use third-party metal and external skill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DualValve View Post
    If there is so much wear that the gib at full adjustment does not reduce the clearance to zero, then either make or have made a new, thicker gib..
    Or, as I found on a very worn lathe: take a 12" long feeler gauge and put in beside the gib to take up the wear. It sounds like a 'hack' way to accomplish reducing the clearance. BUT, it must be a well worn machine, so unless you are going to go through the time and expense of regrinding the ways, the dovetail on the saddle and compound etc, then take up the clearance with a hard shim: aka: feeler gauge stock..
    You can take normal length feeler gauges and try various thicknesses until you find one that will work then buy a full length piece of feeler gauge stock. Most tool retailers have individual 12" feeler gauge in various thicknesses, and I know feeler gauge stock can be bought by the roll, I have .005" and .010" in a roll. I'm surprised how often I use the material as shim stock.

    DualValve
    McMaster have "assortments" as well. I keep one of the Bronze shim-packs handy.

    About a hundred bucks and yah have decades worth of use out of MANY thicknesses as can be cut with decent snips.


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