Monarch 14C Cross Feed Lock Collars (year 1942)
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  1. #1
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    Default Monarch 14C Cross Feed Lock Collars (year 1942)

    Hello,

    I was pulling apart the cross feed assembly and the lock collars fell out and I'm not quite sure the order they go back together. I think I've correctly put things back but I'd appreciate several sets of eyes before I reassemble. Also, why are there (3) lock collars with keyways but only one will engage the mating shaft and its key at a time? One will stay locked and the other two can spin on the shaft. See attached photos.

    Thank you,
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_4583.jpg   img_4585.jpg   img_4586.jpg  

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    I would guess the offsets go on each end and the non offset in the middle - in such a way that the offsets can interact with the one in the middle - and I would guess the key only engages the middle one.

    This is the thread stop feature - actuated by the knurled knob on the side of the crossfeed dial

    Thumbnail shows a bit but not much - likely in any of those SLIM manuals for the "C" models
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mon-stops.jpg  

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    Someone else posted pictures here of their disassembled dial assembly some time ago and it gave me just the clues I needed to build something similar for my little Logan lathe. My video might give you some clues about how it works. I think you really only have two choices about how to put it back together, and either way will work.

    Cheers.

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    Is the purpose of this stop to allow resetting back to a zero point after withdrawing the tool?

    Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by TDegenhart View Post
    Is the purpose of this stop to allow resetting back to a zero point after withdrawing the tool?

    Tom
    It is. I'll suppose the reason for the pair is for internal and external threads

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    Quote Originally Posted by PINCK43 View Post
    Hello,

    I was pulling apart the cross feed assembly and the lock collars fell out and I'm not quite sure the order they go back together. I think I've correctly put things back but I'd appreciate several sets of eyes before I reassemble. Also, why are there (3) lock collars with keyways but only one will engage the mating shaft and its key at a time? One will stay locked and the other two can spin on the shaft. See attached photos.

    Thank you,
    As already explained, the rings are part of the thread chasing stop mechanism. It's a very handy feature. There's special thumb screw that runs in radially from the side of the dial body and interacts with the rings. When the chasing stop is engaged, you can rapidly back the tool out at the end of the threading pass, back the carriage up, then quickly come right back to the same depth of cut. Some versions of the dial allow you to also feed the top slide in between passes. The round-dial 10EE doesn't provide for that and you have to feed in via the compound instead.

    You have the rings in the wrong order. Two of the rings have a tab that projects past the surface of the ring itself; those rings go on the outside, with the tabs pointing in. The ring that has the tab that's flush with both faces of the ring itself goes in the middle. The keyways should help you figure out which outer ring goes to the rear. Properly assembled, the dial will rotate two and a half turns, stop to stop.

    Here's a photo of the ring stack from a square-dial 10EE chasing stop:
    img_6531.jpg


    Cal


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