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  1. #1
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    Default Monarch CW 16 x 30...

    Well, I am now the owner of this Monarch. It actually didn't look that bad from the pictures, so I drove up to take a look at it in person and it looks even better in person. It's in really good shape for it's age. They even let me look inside the headstock, at the gearing, pretty johnoder's recommendation, and it looked pristine except for a slight wear pattern on a mid range gear. Anyways, it is replacing my SB 16, which was, for lack of better terminology, a tide me over lathe, that I often had to go slower and lighter than I expected. This should put me back to where I grew up, running a lathe that just doesn't care how much you want to take off in a shot. Long story short, I still have to get it moved and setup in my shop. I do have some questions though.

    So, I guess my first question is in the following is, what do the build numbers mean?

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    own the exact same machine, in fact my serial number is only a hundred or so away from yours. I have re-timkenized my headstock, working on the apron and crossfeed now, really just doing a complete rebuild for giggles.

    this is an awesome lathe, ways are near indestructibly, unless truly abused. Check the clutch thoroughly, adjust properly and you should be good if condition is as you say. You can contact Monarch for the original build sheet. Mine was built for Bendix and was moved to Clark, and finally Dana as a tool room lathe according to available information.

    Let me know if you need anything. I have finished a complete rebuild of the head stock since Dana employees ran without gear oil for some time. Spindle bearing in mine was a Class 3 (0.0003" runout) and replaced with a new bearing from Emerson. All other Timken bearings are available. My ways are in great condition though I have yet to quantify on actual part.

    Make sure oil pump is working and each feed line is clear. You can manually activate pump, disengage oil lines and confirm flow to clutch actuator, and both spindle bearings.

    good Luck.

  4. #3
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    You have an odd compound compared to my August 1946

    "Manual" available for emailing if you want to private message me that address

    The usual very slim Monarch offering

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    You have an odd compound compared to my August 1946

    "Manual" available for emailing if you want to private message me that address

    The usual very slim Monarch offering
    Good catch, I didn't notice that. I'm not gonna say it, mainly because I'm never that lucky, but that compound looks like the power-angular feed one.

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    This is why I'm thinking it might have it, although I don't know how to engage it or if there was a version of it that just used one like this. It does definitely look like that compound rest though.

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    I'd guess the little gear box on right side with lever in your example photo is related. You have to have some way to make a power compound "go"

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    See, I thought that too, but every example I've found had the dual compound rests on the older machines and on the newer ones, there is a knob on the apron you pull to engage it. I wonder if there is a way to engage it by pulling the cross-slide screw in or out.

    Anyways, I plan on moving the lathe on Thursday.

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    Here's something else I found on the topic.

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    Unbolt the two lock nuts for setting the compound angle and lift it off and look to see if there are drive gears.
    My guess would be the original compound on your lathe was worn or damaged and this it the back compound off of another larger machine that was leaving the shop. Back compound probably did not see as much use.

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    Went and got the new girl today. Well, I thought I had everything locked down and ready to travel. Turns out, the clutch covert blew off somewhere in-between Mass and CT. I really hope it didn't hurt anyone. Anybody ever make one of these from scratch?

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    Right size metal "wash pan" maybe?

    Basically a truncated cone with a flat back end and a flange to mount it

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    Quote Originally Posted by michael.kitko View Post
    Anybody ever make one of these from scratch?
    Be glad its an easy item. Not hard. Adapt, not make.

    Take the diameter and depth, go shop for cookware. Steamer pots, soup pots, etc.

    Commercial heavy-duty, restuarant supply online, new or used, or cosmetic-only lighter weight residential steamer from the nearest Asian market. Aluminium or stainless, take yer pick.

    I'd give non-stick a miss,.. but then again, oil and dirt....



    Ya even gets seamless with nicely rounded bottom corners, may not even have to trim for depth.

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    Thanks for the suggestions. I didn't think of cookware...

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    Quote Originally Posted by michael.kitko View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions. I didn't think of cookware...

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    Exposure to cheap shit yah would not. Though it does work for keeping rocks and dog hair out.

    Exposure to a a Chinese family seating 8 to 20 souls every Saturday dinner for thousands of years, a Buddhist temple feeding a few hundred at a go, or a GI mess hall feeding 6 thousand meals or so every 24 hours, Hobart mixer looking like a fair-sized drill press?

    Some of that stuff is a two-man carry and resembles armour plate!

    Local Asian market, steamer pots. Or Go Ogle "used restaurant equipment" and "stock pots" or "large outdoor cooking pots". Get LUCKY? Good Will store, cheap and cheerful!

    Mass-produced goods. Cut and carve and add mounts to attach is labour enough. Some applications yah only need a third or half or three-quarters of the curve.

    Labour to make anything as nicely formed from a cold start, OTOH?

    Call that a "non trivial exercise"!

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    Looks like a stainless salad/mixing bowl could be a good fit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Looks like a stainless salad/mixing bowl could be a good fit.
    Might not be deep enough. Besides, they are usually uber-thin when done in metals.

    Shiney-wood stock pots can have very substantial walls - partly so they don't get beaten into a resemblance of a cobblestone street in ordinary commercial/military use.

    Other sources, some applications include hub caps, cycle and boat-trailer fenders, aluminium fuel tanks, and high-end trash cans.

    Traffic cone, brass base off a semi-fixed-ammo artillery piece, or the nose cap off a weapons system might be pushing it, kinkery-redneckery wise?

    Ditto glueing artificial HAIR to the bore opening to guide a bar-feeder.

    You'd have to know Machinists?


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    Agree about the depth may not be deep enough.

    Also I wanted to point out this is a great example of why moving any machines they should be shrink wrapped and tarped. The shrink wrap will keep loose pieces from leaving and the tarp will keep the shrink wrap from shredding in the wind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Agree about the depth may not be deep enough.

    Also I wanted to point out this is a great example of why moving any machines they should be shrink wrapped and tarped. The shrink wrap will keep loose pieces from leaving and the tarp will keep the shrink wrap from shredding in the wind.
    Removed and separately crated is wise, too - especially if they are easily-cracked castngs, not hammer-it-out shit-metal.

    And let us know how yah keep the TARP from shredding? Stretch-tight plastic seems to do better than the tarp.

    Best luck I've had is to bungee it snug so it cannot flap near corners and such.

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    Now, I started digging into it. The motor is missing the terminal cover and I haven't been able to find the label plate to see what it is wired for. The heater box, I am not experienced with those, so that is gonna take me a minute. And the upper contactor box is missing it's paper work and some safety closure pieces, easily fabricated. The thing that gets me is the amount of chips inside the boxes.

    This thing also came with a transformer on a stand, but I would rather not use that thing judging alone judging by the crusty wiring. The transformer is a 230 to 440. I haven't totally ruled it out, but I'd like to run it on the lower 220V if it is at all feasible.

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    That little transformer is to run the relay I think that your motor is 440V and is signal voltage only.


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