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  1. #1
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    Question Monarch EE Questions

    Gentlemen,
    I'm not to familiar with the forum search tools so I will just ask. I am in need of two things, what ever clutch parts that make the apron feed and I need to cut some metric pitch threads and don't know where to get the proper gears nor which gears I would need. I believe the pitch is 1 but will need to verify. I have no knowledge of how to figure out the gearing. I have always been baffled by gearing so any help will be appreciated.

    Thank you,
    Fred T

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred T View Post
    Gentlemen,
    I'm not to familiar with the forum search tools so I will just ask. I am in need of two things, what ever clutch parts that make the apron feed and I need to cut some metric pitch threads and don't know where to get the proper gears nor which gears I would need. I believe the pitch is 1 but will need to verify. I have no knowledge of how to figure out the gearing. I have always been baffled by gearing so any help will be appreciated.

    Thank you,
    Fred T
    It matters as to Metric threading (any threading, actually..) whether you have a "Round Dial" or a "Square Dial" 10EE. Sets of the needed Metric gears have been made .. by PM members. To a very high standard.. and even at attractive prices.

    That is not the same as "cheap." ISTR costs of a thousand bucks or thereabouts? In a lovely fitted storage case?

    Meanwile..

    Sticking surfacing clutches can be freed-up, cleaned-up, sometimes only need adjustment or a basic bit of shimming.

    AND/OR.. insuring the 10EE is actually in "surfacing mode" (gnarly on a worn "Round Dial", easier on a Square-dial) rather than single-point threading mode.

    Annnnnd the surfacing-clutches ELSE threading half-nut sliding interlock and the mode control plunger are not stuck, damaged, or simply miss-positioned.

    The apron's friction clutches are otherwise eminently rebuildable, may need but freeing-up and adjustment.

    Monarch still supports the "Square Dial" as to parts.

    The "Round Dial" generally only as to the parts that happen to fit BOTH, plus motor brushes & such for the older DC motors & c. and Bijur lube goods. Both are "bought-in", but expertly so - BY Monarch - so they will be the RIGHT Bijur or Helweg-Carbon parts, no "detective work" nor risk required from we chickn's.

    First thing we usually do is order the manual for our 10EE by Serial number.

    Terri delves old files, provides the pedigree from whom shipped-to, Day One, thru accessories it shipped with, plus the CORRECT manual and drawings for THAT lathe.

    Thereafter, we can discuss a needed part by its proper SKU and description.
    Last edited by thermite; 07-06-2021 at 09:36 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred T View Post
    Gentlemen,
    I'm not to familiar with the forum search tools so I will just ask. I am in need of two things, what ever clutch parts that make the apron feed and I need to cut some metric pitch threads and don't know where to get the proper gears nor which gears I would need. I believe the pitch is 1 but will need to verify. I have no knowledge of how to figure out the gearing. I have always been baffled by gearing so any help will be appreciated.

    Thank you,
    Fred T
    Which series 10EE do you have, round- or square-dial? If built in 1945 or after, it's probably a square-dial. This matters, because the metric gearing sets are different.

    How accurate do the threads need to be? If you need to threads that are exactly to metric pitch (within the limits of the machine), you need a gear set that includes a 127 tooth transposer gear. If less accurate threads are required, there are approximations that can be made without the transposer that are very close.

    This search string will help you find posts about threading: "site:https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/monarch-lathes/ 10EE metric threading" it will work with duckduckgo and should work with Google (for those who enjoy having their web activity tracked).

    What's going on with your feeds? Are you aware of the plunger on the apron that controls feed/thread? If it's in the threading position, feeds are locked out and vise versa.

    Cal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred T View Post
    Gentlemen,
    I'm not to familiar with the forum search tools so I will just ask.
    Fred T
    Can't be bothered to spend 100 seconds to figure it out?

    CarlBoyd

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred T View Post
    Gentlemen,
    I'm not to familiar with the forum search tools so I will just ask. I am in need of two things, what ever clutch parts that make the apron feed and I need to cut some metric pitch threads and don't know where to get the proper gears nor which gears I would need. I believe the pitch is 1 but will need to verify. I have no knowledge of how to figure out the gearing. I have always been baffled by gearing so any help will be appreciated.

    Thank you,
    Fred T
    The apron feed is adjustable. If it is currently slipping, tighten the big disk on the front of the feed assembly. A little goes a long way.

    As Cal said, your question on metric threading depends on which model you have, round dial or square dial. Round dial has the most versatility, because the entire end gear train is exposed and it has a lot more latitude to change gears to non-standard pitches. For both round and square dial there are reproductions of the factory metric gear sets available, but not cheap. For round dial, you can go very cheap, if you are satisfied with small errors (on the order of .02% or less); likely the errors are in the same range as the machine's fundamental accuracy. With a couple of 16dp gears you can use in place of the 24T and 48T gears, you can do quite accurate work. Take a look at these posts:

    Metric Gears for the Round Dial 10EE

    metric threading on the round dial

    Perl program for round dial metric gear calculations

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    You can use google to search practical machinist for you topic.

    Hal

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    Because I like searching with pictures, I always search using Google. “Site:practicalmachinist.com monarch 10EE metric threads”. Then check out the images.

    Good luck, jdub

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    Gentlemen,
    Thank you all for the time you took to respond, to answer some questions and remarks; I did take a 100 seconds to try to figure our the search and had no luck..
    I have a square dial machine, built in the 50's and rebuilt around 67 if my memory serves me correctly. I have adjusted the large washer on the clutch several times, at times it solved the problem however not so much anymore. I am wondering if I am out of adjustment and need new parts or a simple shim. Question is " do the four socket head bolts allow the mechanism to come out and be serviced" or is it deeper than that?
    Thanks again
    Fred T

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    IIRC the design should have the clutch engaging when the handle is about 30 deg down from horizontal. If this doesn't last after adjustment I'd have to say that you're going to have to get into the apron as the clutch cone in in the middle front to back.

    10ee_apron_feed.jpg
    Last edited by rke[pler; 09-20-2021 at 04:12 PM. Reason: added a pic

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred T View Post
    Gentlemen,
    Thank you all for the time you took to respond, to answer some questions and remarks; I did take a 100 seconds to try to figure our the search and had no luck..
    I have a square dial machine, built in the 50's and rebuilt around 67 if my memory serves me correctly. I have adjusted the large washer on the clutch several times, at times it solved the problem however not so much anymore. I am wondering if I am out of adjustment and need new parts or a simple shim. Question is " do the four socket head bolts allow the mechanism to come out and be serviced" or is it deeper than that?
    Thanks again
    Fred T
    The most likely wear points are the bronze bushings. To check those you do not need to remove the housing.

    First remove the lever complete with shaft and right hand bronze bushing. There is a small setscrew on the bottom side of the bore for the bronze bushing closest to the lever, you must remove that then you can use a drift to knock the shaft out. New bushings are available from Monarch.

    If that is not the problem, then it would help to remove the apron before trying anything else. You can remove the housing by pulling the four cap screws, but you may bend up the oil line that fits into the hole on the inside of the housing, only accessible from the top. And that won't gain you much, you need to get to the back side of the apron to remove the clutch assembly.


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