My 10EE and some shop pictures - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post

    Thanks for sharing these!

    Let me see if I understand what you did with the angle iron tacks: The angle iron is laying with the 'V' pointing up. I assume that the gantry's wheels have a mating 'V' slot. Did you weld the angle iron to the vertical flat stock, forming an arrow shaped assembly, then drop the assembly into the expansion joint slot? Is it removable or grouted in? Is the angle iron resting on the concrete, such that it's proud of the floor?

    It would be nice to see a closer view of the smaller, gray gantry.

    Do you have any photos of the small gantry and the rest of your gear loaded on the trailer and ready to go?

    Cal
    Here are some more pictures of the smaller gantry showing more details plus how I would load it on a trailer with a machine already loaded. The pictures show one end rigged at 90 degrees as mentioned could be done.

    The procedure for putting it on the trailer is as follows: First of all, my trailer has two fold-down ramps. They need to have a smooth surface, so I cover them with plywood. Leave the gantry fully lowered. Pull the pins in both ends of the gantry. There are three set screws at the top and bottom of the A-frame columns. Leave those tight. They hold the A-frame position. Pull the gantry up until the first set of the gantry wheels are at the break-over point at the back of the trailer (top of the dove tail). At this point you loosen the set screws on the front column, rotate the A-frame 90 degrees and then tighten.

    The gantry is then dragged forward by the bottom lifting bracket. This lifting bracket looks like the one I’m holding for the big gantry but are round. I couldn’t find the ones for the smaller gantry for the pictures, so I used a shackle as a hook for the demonstration.

    Drag it the rest of the way up sliding on the bracket. You don’t use the wheels as they would make the gantry unstable. When you pull it up, you pull the front column to the side of the trailer which leaves room for the machine. When the back wheels are as far as you can pull them up, you can turn the front A-frame back 90 degrees if there is room. If not, leave then at 90. At this point you strap it down.

    The gantry at its lowest position is 8’ 9” tall and 10’ span. One modification I would make would be to cut-off 12” from the bottom of the vertical columns. This would get you below 8’ and would make it more stable going up the ramp. The second modification I would make if I did this very often would be to change the casters from total lock to four position locks. This would eliminate the little come-along that is holding them parallel. If you have help, attach a tag line at the top of the vertical column to help stabilize. I-beams tend to twists because of lack of tortional strength. It can tend to rock to one side or the other.

    To unload, I assume you just reverse this. However, I haven’t actually done this as I’ve had something else to use to unload it. The devil is in the details. There are many I’ve left out, but hopefully you get the idea.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_0088.jpg   img_0089.jpg   img_0090.jpg   img_0091.jpg   img_0092.jpg  


  2. #42
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    The rest of the pictures of the smaller gantry.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_0093.jpg   img_0094.jpg   img_0095.jpg   img_0096.jpg   img_0097.jpg  


  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post

    OK, NOW I get it!. I thought the expansion joints were under the angle, not perpendicular to it. Very clever! How many expansion joints are used?

    I'm very interested in how you erected the gantry. Rigging is something that fascinates me. I've learned the hard way that you have to think about how you control all six degrees of freedom before lifting anything.

    Cal
    I used two expansion joints which are 20’ apart. The angle iron rails are a little over 30’ long.

    The assembly of the big gantry was as follows. I’ve include a couple of rough drawings to help illustrate.

    It was loaded on a 20’ equipment trailer disassembled. The two A-frames and vertical columns were assembled and laid on 6”x6” beams with the inside facing up. The columns were set with their tops pointed at opposite ends of the trailer. There was some cribbing added and the I-beam with the trolley and hoist already attached was set over the two A-frames. It was hauled this way.

    To unload, the trailer was parked under the building’s I-beam rafters. Two 1-ton, 15’ chain falls were rigged off these rafters and were used to lift the beam. Each A-frame and column is attached to the beam using the front D-ring and a chokered come-along. As the beam goes up, it pulls the A-frames with it. When it is all the way up, the A-frames are hanging loose off the I-beam on the chokered come-alongs. The trailer was then pulled out. (This is shown in Drawing A.)

    Next step is to align the flanges on the I-beam to the A-frame. Use another ¾ ton come-along to connect the top D-ring on the I-beam to the back D-ring on the column. Then raise both ends until the flanges come together. Use a taper pin to align and put in the bolts. (This is shown in Drawing B.)

    One interesting side note: The gantry was designed and built and this procedure formulated before I ever saw or owned the building.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_0101.jpg  

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    I really like the paint color on the Rivett and 10ee. What color and brand of paint is that?

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    Your shop and your choice of equipment is fascinating. Thanks for the look. I'd be interested in a thread discussing your take on the various machines, what you like and what you think are weaknesses or better designed by others. The old stuff is a lot of work but when you get used to it, going to new is hard. I have a sharp VH25 that is like new and has no issues but I'm always thinking when I run it how much better built the old Rambaudi OR 60 is. Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by alcro1998 View Post
    I really like the paint color on the Rivett and 10ee. What color and brand of paint is that?
    The brand for both was Anchor Industrial SAF-T-GARD enamel.
    I don't have a name for the colors, but color code for the 10EE was the following. It matches its original color.
    LB: 3Y20.00
    PG: DY20.50
    MY: 1Y 1.00

    I don't have the code for the Rivett's paint. I'd have to get that from Anchor. I matched this color from the Moore Jig Bore, which was its original.

    Anchor's Polyurethane Converter (J1100) was also used for both.

    I like this paint because of its durability. The hardener is a cyanolite which is about the consistency of molasses. I can control the amount of chip resistance by the amount of hardener I add. More hardener achieves a hard finish; less hardener increases chip resistance. I will vary the amount of hardener I use on different parts of the lathe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beckerkumm View Post
    Your shop and your choice of equipment is fascinating. Thanks for the look. I'd be interested in a thread discussing your take on the various machines, what you like and what you think are weaknesses or better designed by others. The old stuff is a lot of work but when you get used to it, going to new is hard. I have a sharp VH25 that is like new and has no issues but I'm always thinking when I run it how much better built the old Rambaudi OR 60 is. Dave
    I've thought about posting a thread about the Rivett and Monarch - the things I like/don't like and the differences in they way they approached certain areas like spindle bearings. I suppose this could go in the Monarch forum. Where should the discussion of the other machines go?

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    Wherever it goes, I’m interested in your thoughts.

    L7

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    Quote Originally Posted by tailstock4 View Post
    ...

    The assembly of the big gantry was as follows. I’ve include a couple of rough drawings to help illustrate.

    It was loaded on a 20’ equipment trailer disassembled. ...

    To unload, the trailer was parked under the building’s I-beam rafters. Two 1-ton, 15’ chain falls were rigged off these rafters and were used to lift the beam. Each A-frame and column is attached to the beam using the front D-ring and a chokered come-along. As the beam goes up, it pulls the A-frames with it. When it is all the way up, the A-frames are hanging loose off the I-beam on the chokered come-alongs. The trailer was then pulled out. (This is shown in Drawing A.)

    Next step is to align the flanges on the I-beam to the A-frame. Use another ¾ ton come-along to connect the top D-ring on the I-beam to the back D-ring on the column. Then raise both ends until the flanges come together. Use a taper pin to align and put in the bolts. (This is shown in Drawing B.)
    ...
    Thanks! That's very interesting.

    I assume that instead of the inexpensive, cable-type come-along, you were using the chain-type, like this: link

    I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "chokered" come-along. How is that rigged?

    Did you have a scissor lift to set up the chain hoists and then wrangle the A-frames into position, or did you use a really long step-ladder?

    With your design, would it have been possible to have added a hinge pin to the bolt-plates that connect an A-frame to the I-beam, so that you could just lift the I-beam vertically, then push A-frames out and bolt them up? (I don't know if I explained that very well.)

    Cal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    Thanks! That's very interesting.

    I assume that instead of the inexpensive, cable-type come-along, you were using the chain-type, like this: link

    I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "chokered" come-along. How is that rigged?

    Did you have a scissor lift to set up the chain hoists and then wrangle the A-frames into position, or did you use a really long step-ladder?

    With your design, would it have been possible to have added a hinge pin to the bolt-plates that connect an A-frame to the I-beam, so that you could just lift the I-beam vertically, then push A-frames out and bolt them up? (I don't know if I explained that very well.)

    Cal
    A come-along is anything with a load brake and a handle. Most of them are chain but I have seen some with cable or even strap. I used the chain variety.

    In this case by “chokered” I meant I used a round sling choked on itself with a come-along hanging from it. There is an error in my drawing. The choker would be closer to the bolt flange and the come-along hook would have been attached at the D-ring at the top of the A-frame further down. This provides a better angle.

    I used a really tall step ladder to hang the chain falls from the I-beam.

    Yes, you could possibly use a hinge pin, but the A-frame and verticals were assembled together and would be very hard to maneuver without a forklift in order to line them up. I’m not sure I completely understand what you are suggesting. The two come-along method allow free movement with no aligning until you get to the top. When you get to the top, the two come along-alongs will pull them together flush. All you then need is a spud wrench to align.


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