My Very Own Monarch 10EE Restoration - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechanicalman View Post
    How do most people handle installing these replacements? Do you just solder them in place and let them dangle by the leads? Do you tape them down? Make brackets so they mount like the originals?
    Adhesives on most tapes just end-up a delayed-reaction MESS. In general, tape should be avoided.

    Back THEN, they also had "Cambric" (woven-tube linen) and waxed linen lacing cord.

    Here and NOW we have a dozen flavours of tie-wrap and more-yet of shrink-tubing.

    Add a rod here and there of insulating material as stiffener - strips of Formica/Micarta, re-purposed chopstick, Bamboo BBQ skewers, lengths of cut weed-wacker line Kevlar... wotever.. and use the shrink-tubing & tiewraps to brace them to each other or to other suitable components.

    BIG caps, such as electrolytics, either the proper clamps, conduit clamps, or angle-brackets and hose clamps can serve.

    Unlike a motorcar, boat, or aircraft, there isn't often much in the way of vibration to be dealt with. Even so, the goal is to immobilize so they don't vibrate and fracture the leads nor rub-through insulation or even markings.

  2. #42
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    I'd solder them in place. If the leads feel too flimsy you could add wire or shrink tubing to stiffen them up.

    500' of wire is a starting point. You might need twice that by the time you're done. I never did mine, will leave it for a descendant.

    Crimping ring terminals would be a stylin' way to go.

    Before you go too far try watching the relays in the DC box when it's thunking like that. I think that can be an effect of one of the relays being too sensitive.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by rke[pler View Post
    500' of wire is a starting point. You might need twice that by the time you're done.
    I gutted one of mine for the SSD conversion, but in Sawzall-ing the conduits and such?

    ISTR there are 80 or fewer wires. Total.

    The "average" is perhaps three feet long, the longest not even six feet.

    So yazz, @ 240 to 400 feet, even with prep waste, 500 should be fair close, and perhaps but 100 crimp terminals, since not all terminations even used them.

    More of each can always be had of course.

    I have had, for ages, REALLY good crimp tools, several types. Many are "ratcheting" ones, and complex to learn proper use of. All were well worth their painful cost.

    Junk crimpers make trashy crimps of dodgy reliability. Then you get to do them more than once. No fun in that atall.

  4. #44
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    Having completely rewired and restored my 59 WIAD, I think I boasted about using over 1000 ft. of wire. Of course all different gages. Mine had so many jumpers, bodged repairs, and rotted insulation, this was the only alternative. Since I have but basic electrical expertise, making detailed drawings of each wire as it was removed proved invaluable as well as RKeplers factory schematic, and I was able to compare and weed out what was wired incorrectly. Every and I mean every component was bench checked, cleaned, (this does not guarantee that they will work in service, but 20yrs in is pretty good) all resistors and available caps were replaced, and tubes checked ( I have a technicians 50's tube tester found on the side of the road that proved quite useful). But proof is in the pudding and except for a occasional wonky tube and a long warmup, the unit is flawless and smooth. Btw, I crimped and soldered every connection, I'm sure someone will poo poo this, but hey.


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