New Set of 10EE Knobs - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Maybe, not sure if this is it, but there is this( 1003-3 ( 3M) 4-57 ).

    I think I saw a ball turner somewhat similar to that one on E-Bay at one time.

    Jim W.

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    "Peter, have you ever seen the patent papers for that accessory?"

    Not the ball-turning accessory.

    Perhaps it was considered "prior art"?


    You know, a ball-turner, even a primitive one, constructed from an import boring head and a modified (or adapted) QCTP holder, "over the top" style, would make quick work of the front contours of the replacement knobs.

  3. #23
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    1003-3 ( 3M) 4-57
    OK, it was a 1957 publication. I think 57 was about the finest year for Monarch 10EEs. The company had not started cost saving, so the standard features still included the feed release clutch, the carriage handwheel clutch, and an ever-increasing set of optional accessories were available. Within a couple of years, the aluminum cast doors were gone, the less-expensive to produce modular had replaced WiaD, the number of accessories became fewer, etc.

    -Dave

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    "The company had not started cost saving, so the standard features still included the feed release clutch, the carriage handwheel clutch, and an ever-increasing set of optional accessories were available. Within a couple of years, the aluminum cast doors were gone, the less-expensive to produce modular had replaced WiaD, the number of accessories became fewer, etc."

    Agreed.

    It may indeed be true that 1957 was Monarch's "finest hour".

    All of its conventional, and even its special turning tools were fully mature, and there was little else that could be done to improve them.

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    Any chance of getting scans of those catalogs ? Would love to see what all was offered over the years for these machines.

    Cheers,
    Roberto

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    This my be a bit too much 'caveman' for you machinists out there, but a clockmaker would turn the tops to a curvature by hand using a graver followed by a little filing and polishing with buff sticks. With a little practice, it would be fairly easy to make them all look 'close enough'.

    Older clockmaker's bench lathes usually came with a simple T-rest for this very purpose. I've got ones for both my Wade Precision #5 and the Stark #4. They are very useful for quickly turning a bevel and other little tasks that might otherwise take a lot of setup, etc. As a clock restorer, I don't make things precisely to size from drawings like a machinist, but generally fit things by hand & eye. In clockwork, if it looks close enough it is close enough.

    Rich McCarty
    http://www.restoredclocks.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by drof34 View Post
    Maybe, not sure if this is it, but there is this( 1003-3 ( 3M) 4-57 ).
    Hi Jim,

    1003-3 would probably be the publication (#1003) and revision (3).

    3M is the quantity printed (3,000).

    4-57 is April 1957.

    This is a pretty standard format for publication IDs.

    - Leigh

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveE907 View Post
    All of the zinc alloy knobs on my 1952 MG Square Dial were in poor cosmetic condition and some of them were mechanically damaged at their shaft joints from long use or mishap. I decided to make a new set from stainless steel.
    Sorry to keep bringing up eight year old posts, but I'm working my way through the archives and haven't seen an answer to this:

    How did you drill the new knobs to match the original holes in the shafts? My understanding is that Monarch drilled them by hand, so every one is slightly different.

    BTW, you do beautiful work!

    Thanks,
    Alan

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    Quote Originally Posted by CowDriver View Post
    Sorry to keep bringing up eight year old posts, but I'm working my way through the archives and haven't seen an answer to this:

    How did you drill the new knobs to match the original holes in the shafts? My understanding is that Monarch drilled them by hand, so every one is slightly different.

    BTW, you do beautiful work!

    Thanks,
    Alan
    I could be wrong. I should even look, as the fotos are among those I saved offline copies of for my own 1942 Round Dial's 'new knob needs', should I live long enough to get a round tuit.

    But ISTR Dave - and others - had made new SHAFTS as well as knobs for at least some of the needfuls?

    Seems wise. That may not be where the 'pretty' is, but shafts and their business end is where the wear and wiggle is.

    Bill

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by CowDriver View Post
    Sorry to keep bringing up eight year old posts, but I'm working my way through the archives and haven't seen an answer to this:

    How did you drill the new knobs to match the original holes in the shafts? My understanding is that Monarch drilled them by hand, so every one is slightly different.

    BTW, you do beautiful work!

    Thanks,
    Alan
    I'm not sure how Dave did it, but I would use the old knob or shaft to line up the new knob for drilling and reaming, much like I did when I installed a new leadscrew on my 10EE:
    Cal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    I'm not sure how Dave did it, but I would use the old knob or shaft to line up the new knob for drilling and reaming, much like I did when I installed a new leadscrew on my 10EE:
    Cal
    OK, I see how it could be done. That's actually pretty clever. Get the old knob's hole lined up with the mill spindle, insert a dummy shaft, clamp shaft securely, replace old knob with new, drill & ream hole. Something like that?

    The downside is that I will now be tempted to do it!

  12. #32
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    I used the taper reamer as the dummy shaft for lining up. A pita for 11 (eleven) ? knobs but it worked.

  13. Likes DaveE907 liked this post
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    Mine were certainly hand-drilled as I discovered to my disdain when I went to re-fit the knobs and realised nothing quite lined up.

    If I had new knobs made I would simply cross-drill new holes and fit new taper pins.

  15. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter. View Post
    Mine were certainly hand-drilled as I discovered to my disdain when I went to re-fit the knobs and realised nothing quite lined up.

    If I had new knobs made I would simply cross-drill new holes and fit new taper pins.
    As said, I may not live long enough to get to it, but... a thought for the young(er) 'uns who MAY do.

    Sacrilege, perhaps, but several of a 10EE's 'knobs' would be far less likely to get Stilson bite- marks (as mine came in the door with..) if they were... per 'maritime' practice - lever style dogs. The various cover doors, I mean, more than anything else. Just seems more proper and practical for how they are used.

    Bill

  16. #35
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    Thank you CowDriver, I studied under super master machinists at NASA over fifty years ago and a tiny bit rubbed off on me.

    I had to think to recall how I put new tapered pins in, it's been almost eight years since doing that work and now I'm not young at anything but heart.

    For some of the knobs such as the covers I simply made new shafts and did them from scratch so had no original pin hole to deal with except the cams. Set those up with original pin hole axis and went to work. Everything appears original other than the knobs as they aren't chrome plated zinc alloy.

    For some shafts I didn't want to replace I made a short original size pin that installed in the shaft with Loctite for good measure, the pin length was made so the ends didn't protrude beyond the shaft OD and the knobs were installed with the new pins roughly at right angle to the original ones. That avoids drilling and reaming through what will probably be an off center cross hole. The mild steel shaft and mild steel tapered pin look solid to cutting tools, they prefer that.

    For a few others where I had the shaft so I could set it up in a turret mill I did it just as Daryl Bane suggested above using a reamer to align with the original hole. I showed a quick method to align with the original hole using a tapered pin reamer, a very simple to make tool and a spirit level in an old post you might come across.

    The main point is there are many ways to do the job successfully, pick the most efficient one for the task at hand that is within your skillset.

    Best of good fortune with your project.


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