Pros & Cons of starting off on a Monarch CY16 (18.5x30" 5HP) lathe - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by *D'B=6bk View Post
    I have a 60A 220V welding outlet near the machine fortunately. I'll definitely look into the DIY RPC option.
    For years I used a rope started 7.5 to run the shop on. The only thing it balked at was starting the 5HP two stage air compressor - and adding in a 3HP idler would erase that problem

    This was no panel, and no capacitors - just a 40 AMP breaker to be flipped on as I came up abruptly with the rope

    When I got tired of listening to the idler, I invested in a new 10 HP Phase Perfect - now 15 years old (15 bucks a month for the 180 months)

    The CY will be ultra easy to start because a real lathe like this has a CLUTCH
    Last edited by johnoder; 09-21-2019 at 09:11 AM.

  2. #22
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    There's no downsides. Learn to respect it and then just use it. Learn its quirks and oddities by practicing turning various diameters or threads and then you're on your way.

    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk

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    Thanks to the guys that gave me advice in this thread. I ended up getting a salvaged 7.5HP idler for a phase converter and a salvaged 5HP to power the lathe (the existing motor was labeled 230/460 but turned out to have been rewound as 460-only).

    I used a simple 30A industrial on/off switch and a rope-pull method to get 'er started. I gotta say, the $150 I spent on this (including gas to go get the motors) is an order of magnitude better than the options I was looking at prior to finding this forum.

  4. #24
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    SWEET
    Might be a good idea to check what the three phase voltages are, just to make sure nothing is to far out of balance to fry things.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by *D'B=6bk View Post
    I gotta say, the $150 I spent on this (including gas to go get the motors) is an order of magnitude better than the options I was looking at prior to finding this forum.
    And now when people talk about just about any other lathe, you'll snicker and know there's ain't $hit compared to yours.

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  7. #26
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    Congrats on the lathe! We'll learn together; here's what I'm starting with (16" x 54 CW). Also $150, must be the going price for similar condition...

    20180813_161721.jpg

    There's a Monarch-specific forum you need to be a part of!
    https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/monarch-lathes/

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    A beautiful machine.

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    I drug this one home about two months ago. I'm cleaning it up and ensuring all the lubrication systems work prior to putting it into service.

    img_6213.jpg

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  11. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Tip ;- Cutting the number of belts to 1 or maybe 2, and setting them to run slack, …….may give you a little bit of a ''safety net'' in the event of you doing something silly etc etc etc, while learning to drive the beast.
    Not really it won't. Them's "A" section belts, not the "FHP" sheave look-alikes for mawnlowers and such.

    They can last near-as-dammit forever as-arranged. Also capable of transmitting about five-plus HP EACH if short life is OK, so can still tear yah up, and badly so.

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  13. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    And now when people talk about just about any other lathe, you'll snicker and know there's ain't $hit compared to yours.
    Not really.

    Mostly yah say nuthin' much atall and feel a tad sad so few are left who know what the Grand Old machine-tools even were.

    The "Oh! I see you have a South BEND!" or "I have a <LSO> from Harbor Freight. Same thing, but smaller."

    Welll. Neither mentality can even be REACHED. Different planet, one supposes?

    Grand-Olds will teach yah THAT much soon enough!

  14. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Not really.

    Mostly yah say nuthin' much atall and feel a tad sad so few are left who know what the Grand Old machine-tools even were.

    The "Oh! I see you have a South BEND!" or "I have a <LSO> from Harbor Freight. Same thing, but smaller."

    Welll. Neither mentality can even be REACHED. Different planet, one supposes?

    Grand-Olds will teach yah THAT much soon enough!
    Had a guy in my shop a few days ago, he looked over my lathes, then asked why I did not have a Grizzly, he said those are the good ones

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    Had a guy in my shop a few days ago, he looked over my lathes, then asked why I did not have a Grizzly, he said those are the good ones
    LOL! The ones with powerful teeth, long claws and thick fur, maybe. But sheesh!!! Talk about rough sex! And didja ever try to buy high-heels for one of 'em that actually FIT?

    Cheaper to keep 'em barefoot and pregnant ... unless you can git them into a Guverment job with good bennies. Black bears are more likely to max-score the government test for accomplished thievery, though, so best a Griz could do mought be to file for compensation off the back of racial discrimination?

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Not really it won't. Them's "A" section belts, not the "FHP" sheave look-alikes for mawnlowers and such.

    They can last near-as-dammit forever as-arranged. Also capable of transmitting about five-plus HP EACH if short life is OK, so can still tear yah up, and badly so.
    I took the old belts off and am running the lathe on a single new belt with just the weight of the motor and plate providing tension. It hasn't showed any sign of slipping and I'm definitely not depending on the arrangements to keep my appendages safe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    And now when people talk about just about any other lathe, you'll snicker and know there's ain't $hit compared to yours.
    There is definitely a feeling of pride as I watch my YouTube machining mentors working on machines half the size of mine with lots of limitations that mine doesn't have. Then again, to whom much is given, much is expected. What good is a skookum machine if the operator doesn't know how to use it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    Had a guy in my shop a few days ago, he looked over my lathes, then asked why I did not have a Grizzly, he said those are the good ones
    I've run into those types before. IMO they are so eager to have a conversation that they just hope you don't know that they don't know what they are talking about. I drive a classic car on a daily basis and get to hear a lot of cheerful BS from people that don't really "know" anything. Kinda like the guys that say:
    "What year is that, a 69'?"
    "Nope, 1953."
    "Oh I drove one JUST LIKE IT in high-school."
    ....(you sure?)...

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  21. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by *D'B=6bk View Post
    I took the old belts off and am running the lathe on a single new belt with just the weight of the motor and plate providing tension. It hasn't showed any sign of slipping and I'm definitely not depending on the arrangements to keep my appendages safe.
    Aye. Folks as think a Vee belt will "slip" have prolly always used them with one sheave under two-inches in diameter! LARGE enough sheaves, the buggers will actually snap before they slip.

    One did NOT want to be "in the zone" when the first of a gang of six heavy-section vees 'tween a 100 HP GE 416-volter cut loose and waxed it mates driving a PB-44 compressor to 120 CFM @ 3,600 PSIG, Air Products A2 field-mobile one-ton per day LOX plant!



    Back to the shop... the inertia alone in the mass of workholding and work on even a nine-inch lathe can still hurt yah badly enough.

    Not my favorite belting since Gilmer & Sputniks for synchronous, or PolyVee for tight-wrap arrived, but still.. Vee has been into lots of places for lots of years JFDI'ing the dang job.

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    Quote Originally Posted by *D'B=6bk View Post
    There is definitely a feeling of pride as I watch my YouTube machining mentors working on machines half the size of mine with lots of limitations that mine doesn't have. Then again, to whom much is given, much is expected. What good is a skookum machine if the operator doesn't know how to use it.
    It is sort of a perverse twist of fate that the best machines (older, heavier, more rigid) are the most affordable as long as you can move them and power them. The great thing about taking up this hobby is there is so much to learn and, with this board, so much knowledge ready and willing to help. My advice is take your time and enjoy the learning process. There is much that can only be learned through patience and practice. And as others have said, be deliberate and careful. Don't allow yourself to be distracted.

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  24. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by marka12161 View Post
    It is sort of a perverse twist of fate that the best machines (older, heavier, more rigid) are the most affordable as long as you can move them and power them. The great thing about taking up this hobby is there is so much to learn and, with this board, so much knowledge ready and willing to help. My advice is take your time and enjoy the learning process. There is much that can only be learned through patience and practice. And as others have said, be deliberate and careful. Don't allow yourself to be distracted.
    This board is a real gem. It definitely isn't the case in all online communities that amateurs are welcomed and encouraged instead being condescended to or worse.

  25. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    One did NOT want to be "in the zone" when the first of a gang of six heavy-section vees 'tween a 100 HP GE 416-volter cut loose and waxed it mates driving a PB-44 compressor to 120 CFM @ 3,600 PSIG, Air Products A2 field-mobile one-ton per day LOX plant!

    I wouldn't know about that. I never dabbled in the small stuff. I generally stuck to 250-500HP 460 or 2,500V direct drive Frick or FES screw compressors pushing anhydrous ammonia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by *D'B=6bk View Post
    This board is a real gem. It definitely isn't the case in all online communities that amateurs are welcomed and encouraged instead being condescended to or worse.
    LOL! Well.. that might be because "manual" machine-tools are largely "old memories", we've lost so damned much industry we are either retired, underemployed, or had to change careers a long time ago to earn a decent living?

    Not so much that "misery loves company", but nostalgia surely may!


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