Removing headstock from a 10EE lathe
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  1. #1
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    Hi all:
    I'm new to this forum, and I'm awfully glad I found it!!!
    I've just bought a vintage 1947 Monarch 10EE that needs a bed regrind.
    Have any of you taken the headstock off a similar machine?
    I know there are 2 straps that clamp the headstock casting to the ways.
    The bolts are accessed from underneath.
    There are also 2 additional capscrews accessible from the top, that are tapped into the ways.
    The rear strap is the one I can't figure out how to get to!
    I've tried to get the idler gearbox off the machine, but I cannot seem to remove it.
    I can get it loose and wiggling around, but no way on God's green earth, can I pull it free.
    I think the idler gear that transmits into the main gearbox is the culprit, but I'm not sure, and I can't get it out anyway!!
    Please help if you can!!!
    Thanks in advance

    Marcus


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    Implmex, I had just written a very detailed reply on how to remove the gearbox and the headstock, when I realized you probably have the old style of gearbox. The pretty one with the big round selector. And I have not the slightest idea on this model. If it is like the later ones, you will have to remove the gearbox with the end gearing to get to those pesky bolts and clamp. The later gearbox will slide out and away from the headstock and ways. But it is kind of a chinese(sorry!) puzzle to get it out. I'm sorry I can't help you. Daryl

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    Originally posted by daryl bane:
    Implmex, I had just written a very detailed reply on how to remove the gearbox and the headstock, when I realized you probably have the old style of gearbox. The pretty one with the big round selector. And I have not the slightest idea on this model. If it is like the later ones, you will have to remove the gearbox with the end gearing to get to those pesky bolts and clamp. The later gearbox will slide out and away from the headstock and ways. But it is kind of a chinese(sorry!) puzzle to get it out. I'm sorry I can't help you. Daryl
    Well now, I might be wrong as to to type of gearbox you have, looks like according to D.Thomas's timeline, that the newer style started in '44. If so, I can help you. Daryl

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    Hi Daryl:
    My machine is indeed the square thread selector model, not the earlier round dial version.
    I assumed that you would have to remove the end gearbox, so I took off the cover and removed all the gears.
    I pulled the two bolts that hold the gearbox down, but I can't seemm to wiggle the gearbox out.
    It's loose enough to move about 1/16th" back and forth, and about 1/32" up and down, but it won't come out, and I'm afraid to force it.
    There must be something in the way, but I can't, for the life of me, figure out what it is.
    I would really appreciate any information you are willing to provide.
    If the box is just hanging up on a bit of gasket glue or something like that, then an artistic knock in the right place ought to pop it free.
    If there's a gear cluster in the way, however, it'll not improve by giving it a bash!!
    Thanks very much for responding and for any info you can send my way.
    Cheers

    Marcus

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    Okay. Here we go. I don't know exactly which two bolts you said you took off, but here's the sequence. Remove the tumbler lever, it's the one on the RH side of the gearbox, right in front of the threading leadscrew. Should be held on with a taper pin. Now remove the zinc tumbler detent plate that the lever covers. Should be be two sockethead screws. The tumbler shaft should slide out to the right out of that hole. If there is a burr on the shaft, it will be alittle more difficult to get out, it might wreck the bronze bushing, but it is easily replaced. Now take out the two sockethead bolts on the top of the half round radius gearbox cover. One on each side of that headstock tombstone. You will have to remove the threading selector tombstone on the headstock.Unscrew the little cap with the two spanner holes on the big threading selector knob. There is a spring behind it, so don't let that expensive little cap fly out of the room.Remove the big knob and key. Now remove the three sockethead bolts holding the tombstone on the headstock. You may have to jiggle, but it should come off no problem. Still with me?
    Now pull the half round radius gear cover straight towards you. With that cover out of the way, you will see two big sockethead bolts at the top that bolt the gearbox to the ways. Remove these. At the bottom of the gearbox right under the feed and thread plate
    and knob is a secret cover plate held on by two slotted screws. Remove the plate and back inside is two more big sockethead bolts that secure the lower part of the gearbox to the ways. Remove these. Make sure you have removed the headstock drive gear from the end gearing box. It's the one top RH. You said you removed all these gears so hopefully you removed that one too. Also the control rod and the threaded leadscrew should be disconnected from their spigots on the gearbox. Get a buddy, and easily slide that gearbox to the back away from the machine. It is god awful heavy so be careful, and have a place to put it so you won't have to think about it while in mid-air. With the gearbox out, you can know look down the back of the headstock and see those pesky bolts and clamp. You may have to fabricate a wrench to get in there, but now your home free. Make sure you have the ways on the base when you get it ground, so it will be one solid unit. Wouldn't hurt to check the torque of the way to base bolts. I think these are about 150 to 175 ftlbs. Hope I haven't left anything out and I hope this helps. Daryl

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    Hi Daryl:
    Please see the following post for my reply...I kind of goobered this one!!
    Cheers

    MC (not completely retarded, just mentally challenged from time to time!!)


    [This message has been edited by implmex (edited 06-25-2002).]

    [This message has been edited by implmex (edited 06-25-2002).]

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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by implmex:
    [B]Hi Daryl:
    I just received your reply.
    Thank you very much.
    You have just saved my bacon!!!
    The Monarch Service tech told me I'd have to strip off the main gearbox but he didn't really tell me how.
    This sure is one complex piece of equipment!
    I will begin flinging parts round with great abandon and take lots of pictures as I do it.
    Hopefully we can build a good database on how to do a rebuild.
    I'm sorry now that I didn't take pics of the carriage remilling and Turcite application, or the cross slide grinding steps.
    Maybe I'll duplicate the setups again just for a photo shoot.
    Thanks again, Daryl!!
    Cheers

    Marcus

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    Marcus, As you proceed, you will be amazed at how complex a manual lathe can be. Parts from Monarch except for gaskets and some bearings, will be expensive,and I mean really expensive, so be prepared to make alot of your parts yourself. Don't give up,because you will think about it, I know. Have fun and take alot of pix. I love to see those kind of pictures because I am in the middle of a EE project myself. Daryl

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    Hi Daryl:
    What sort of shop setup do you have?
    I'm a one man industrial design "house"
    I have my shop set up in a mini storage warehouse that is 18'x 36'.
    My three phase is swiped from the elevator, and I've got the joint crammed full of stuff.
    I build a lot of prototypes in plastic, so I'm really well set up for CNC milling.
    I bought the Monarch because I wanted a better lathe than the wimpy 12 x 36 Taiwanese machine I got 12 years ago.
    I build 3 or 4 injection molds a year, so I've got a decent surface grinder and a nice little sinker EDM.
    Rebuilding the Monarch is a bit like a vintage car restoration for me...I'm treating it as a lustful indulgence, and I have no set schedule in mind for completion.
    I originally intended to use it right off the dealer's floor, but as soon as I took the first test cut with it,I decided it's worth a really high end rebuild, so I shifted my plans and hung onto the old Taiwanese beater to do the "real" work while I doll up the Ferrari.
    It's going to be soooo sweet to have a really GOOD quality lathe after so many years of tooling about with the junker.
    So that's me in a nutshell.
    Cheers

    Marcus

  10. #10
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    I have a converted garage shop. But it has air-conditioning and painted sheetrock walls. Quite nice really. My mill is a Tree
    2uvr and I also have a 12x36 Enco "beater"
    I also longed for the finest lathe and am restoring my 59 EE. A friend of mine Tim, is doing a 64 EE just a few miles away. Small world. I make widgets for the motion picture industry at the real job, but the home shop is for play and old motorcycles. Daryl

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    Hi Daryl:
    I got a chance to work on the Monarch today...everything went just grandly!!
    I got the gearbox out, the only real difficulty was the sheared drive pin on the leadscrew and the diddly little screws on the feedshaft dog clutch.
    I left the feedhaft connected to the apron and just removed the whole works en bloc.
    Worked beautifully.
    I took lots of pictures too, but I haven't gotten a chance to look at them or edit them yet.
    It sure was a stinky and messy job...55 year old gearbox oil is EVIL, and it's everywhere.
    Turns out one of the drain tubes for the gearbox got smashed ages ago, and the gearbox has been empty for a while.
    Fortunately, it was only the end gearing that was affected, and the gears still appear fine.
    You were right, that gearbox is HEAVY!!!
    Fortunately I've got a lift truck and was able to just slide it right onto the forks.
    Daryl, I want to thank you again for your excellent instructions..they were a BIG help.
    Cheers

    Marcus


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