Restoration of Monarch 10EE Serial#26080 Delivered on 11/2/1944 to Buick - Page 7
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 7 of 10 FirstFirst ... 56789 ... LastLast
Results 121 to 140 of 195
  1. #121
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    3,756
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    931
    Likes (Received)
    513

    Default

    Tom,

    This photo shows the transformer on the left side of the frame; it's only function is to provide voltage to the start button pilot light:


    This link shows a replacement transformer: 10EE MG 440 to 220 Conversion Checklist

    To my amazement, the same guy that was selling the transformers on eBay in 2011 still has them, now $7 including shipping:
    220v primary 6v secondary 300ma power transformer NEW! | eBay

    Cal

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    England UK
    Posts
    1,891
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    785
    Likes (Received)
    770

    Default

    I replaced the bulb holder contacts in the green button on mine to take a modern style bulb.

    https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...-button-265044

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    31,460
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    9879

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    Tom,

    This photo shows the transformer on the left side of the frame; it's only function is to provide voltage to the start button pilot light:

    Off-topic.. or maybe just "delayed", as ISTR someone had asked? ..but in sorting my stash of 10EE part-outs, discovered I have an old, but apparently complete, mini-drum switch for the coolant pump I didn't know I had.

    Should anyone need such a device, email me.

    Cal, d'you have data that could confirm it only has two switched poles?

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    3,756
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    931
    Likes (Received)
    513

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    ... discovered I have an old, but apparently complete, mini-drum switch for the coolant pump I didn't know I had.

    ...

    Cal, d'you have data that could confirm it only has two switched poles?
    I does appear that a 2-pole switch was used. If you look at drawing EE-3216, the section of the "Elementary Diagram" in the upper-right corner shows the drum switch and pump motor. Power for the pump is taken off of the load side of the contactor, before the overload heaters. T3 connects directly to the pump motor, the other two legs connect to the drum switch and then on to the pump motor.

    If you have the switch handy, could you post some photos? I don't have a good photo of one.

    Cal

  5. #125
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    31,460
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    9879

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    I does appear that a 2-pole switch was used. If you look at drawing EE-3216, the section of the "Elementary Diagram" in the upper-right corner shows the drum switch and pump motor. Power for the pump is taken off of the load side of the contactor, before the overload heaters. T3 connects directly to the pump motor, the other two legs connect to the drum switch and then on to the pump motor.

    If you have the switch handy, could you post some photos? I don't have a good photo of one.

    Cal
    I think there are some Wasabi peas in the larder. Nikon seems to need a bribe these days to co-operate...

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    If you have the switch handy, could you post some photos? I don't have a good photo of one.
    Cal,

    If this is the switch you are referring to, next to the reset button. Here are some images.

    From under the switch

    monarch_10ee_image_switchview1.jpg

    Right side view

    monarch_10ee_image_switchview2.jpg

    Left side view

    3monarch_10ee_image_switchview3.jpg

    Tom

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    3,756
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    931
    Likes (Received)
    513

    Default

    Yes, that's the switch. Thanks.

    Cal

  8. #128
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Salinas, CA USA
    Posts
    4,154
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    266
    Likes (Received)
    232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    If you have the switch handy, could you post some photos? I don't have a good photo of one.
    Cal, I have a spare if you are looking for one:

    img_0319.jpg


    img_0320.jpg


    img_0321.jpg

  9. #129
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    340
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    7

    Default

    Re taper pins;
    Always note the orientation of the shaft & whatever is being held to it by the pin.
    Often times they were drilled & reamed using a common drill press, or worse; hand drilled at assembly and the tapered hole will only match one way, not at 180º A small prick punch can mark them before disassembly and save a LOT of time later on.

    Seems like printing presses were notorious for that; although keeping the orientation may have been the intended purpose.

  10. #130
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default Generator commutator

    Shown below is an image of the MG unit's generator commutator. It looks like the brushes have worn a good depth groove in the commutator. I don't think stoning will do much as I am not sure just how much copper is left under the groove and I don't want the structure to be that thin (not sure if that matters or not).

    3monarch_10ee_image_generatorcommutator.jpg

    I am open to ideas here. Please note the MG Unit worked fine prior to my disassembly to clean and service the units so I know that in its current condition, it was working.

    Thanks

    Tom

  11. #131
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    31,460
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    9879

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dinotom View Post
    Shown below is an image of the MG unit's generator commutator. It looks like the brushes have worn a good depth groove in the commutator. I don't think stoning will do much as I am not sure just how much copper is left under the groove and I don't want the structure to be that thin (not sure if that matters or not).

    3monarch_10ee_image_generatorcommutator.jpg

    I am open to ideas here. Please note the MG Unit worked fine prior to my disassembly to clean and service the units so I know that in its current condition, it was working.

    Thanks

    Tom
    I'd turn it. More than enough Copper left for its next long-run.

    It's a Reliance, after all.

    If the brothers Bodine had not already made an advertising slogan out of it, Reliance - at least "of that era" - could have made the same claim:

    Bodine motors do too "wear out". They just take longer.

  12. #132
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Madera county california usa
    Posts
    2,534
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    643

    Default

    Looks like a lot of the copper is worn away.

    There must be a data sheet showing minimum usable diameter or there may be a way of measuring the remaining material.

    The un-worn area can be turned down to match then cleaned up.

    If you do not have the ability to properly turn the commutator you may look at buying 2 sets of brushes.

    On one remove just a tiny bit on the narrow sides so they clear the sides.

    When you can get it done correctly then the other set.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

  13. #133
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default Generator wire repair and cleanup

    I did NOT take the generator unit totally apart as there is no motor shop I'm confident in to repair this motor if it is beyond my scope. I cleaned it the best I could would lector motor cleaner, trust me, the amount of dirt that came out of this thing was astounding, I had a dozen big rags that ended up in the garbage they were so black with soot and grease. Once cleaned, the wiring showed a lot of fraying and wear. I replaced those wires (12AWG copper stranded, with ring terminals and heat-shrink).

    Now I need to finish stripping the interior of the lathe base so I can temporarily remount the motor/exciter unit and re connect it to make sure it still working. And since it was working when I removed the unit from the machine and since no motor shops are open now here anyway; I'm going to leave the commutator alone for now. If it becomes problematic, I'll just remove the unit again and deal with it then.

    Bad Wire
    3monarch_10ee_image_generatorwires_bad2.jpg

    Another bad wire
    3monarch_10ee_image_generatorwires_bad.jpg

    Good as new (hopefully)
    3monarch_10ee_image_generatorwiresrepaired.jpg

    I also removed the power junction box from the back of the lathe. A bit messy in there, a lot of poorly spliced wires. I have a spare 8x6x4 box and some heavy duty terminal strips around here somewhere that I'll replace that with.

    3monarch_10ee_image_mainpowerconnectionbox.jpg

    I also spent the last three days (since I'm stuck here all day) sanding all the exterior pieces; trim, doors and covers for the last coat of primer. I will be putting the first coat of paint on all those today. I also stripped almost all the paint of the lathe itself, except for the front. I just need to give it a good shot with the big wire wheel on my angle grinder, then sand it somewhat smooth and prime it so it'll be ready for paint soon.

  14. #134
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rochester, NY USA
    Posts
    2,263
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10
    Likes (Received)
    537

    Default

    [QUOTE=dinotom;3507632]Shown below is an image of the MG unit's generator commutator. It looks like the brushes have worn a good depth groove in the commutator. I don't think stoning will do much as I am not sure just how much copper is left under the groove and I don't want the structure to be that thin (not sure if that matters or not).

    3monarch_10ee_image_generatorcommutator.jpg

    I am open to ideas here. Please note the MG Unit worked fine prior to my disassembly to clean and service the units so I know that in its current condition, it was working.

    Thanks

    Tom[/QUOTE

    It looks too nice to mess with....

    I would just put it back together unless the brushes are at end of life for length, it shouldn't be too hard to get the brushes back in the original places.
    Then give them a touch with a brush seating stone and check contact, blow out the leftover dust.
    This may outlast you unless you are planning on running it hard and put it away wet.

    If you are going to use new brushes, chamfer the corners so they fit into the worn area,
    rough seat with some 220 to 330 grit aluminum oxide paper strips, and finish off with the seating stone,
    check contact, blow out the leftover dust.

    Bill

  15. Likes labeeman liked this post
  16. #135
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default Generator End Bell and Misc

    About to put the commutator end bell back on the generator but this is bothering me. In the photo below it certainly looks to me like there is supposed to be a bearing in that recess that the shaft goes thru prior to exiting the housing. That area was just grease packed when I took it apart. The bearing is in the housing shown in the second photo which rides on the machined lip of the recess. I'm not an expert on these greased units but is that recess there to hold a lot of grease for the bearing and shaft?

    In the third photo, it doesn't appear that any third bearing is part of the unit. Can anyone that's taken this apart opine on if that recess is left open for grease?

    Shaft Hole in end bell
    monarch_10ee_image_commutatorendbellshafthole.jpg

    Bearing in retainer
    monarch_10ee_image_generatorcommutatorbearinghousinginstalled.jpg

    Generator diagram from manual
    monarch_10ee_image_generatordiagram.jpg

    On a side note, I put the basecoat on the doors and access covers. I decided not to spray as

    A. It was too windy here in FL yesterday and B. I'm trying not to do anything to compromise my respiratory functionality. That didn't work out so well as the automotive grade paint is too thin, even with hardener to apply properly with a foam roller. All pieces were thoroughly wet sanded with 600 grit.

    The poor base coat will be unnoticeable and shouldn't matter as I will now spray on two additional top coats.

    monarch_10ee_image_doorsandcoversbasecoatwetsanded.jpg

    And yes, I am purposely painting this to match my toolboxes....vanity

  17. #136
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default Rewired power to contactor

    Since I was upgrading the power connection box on the rear of the machine from a small round metal box that was jam packed with splices and wire nutted connections to a more clean larger box with a terminal block.

    The existing wires coming from the contactor barely stuck out from the conduit, thus all the splices in the original box. I pulled new 10AWG copper stranded wire to replace the old wires and give me the extra length required to complete what I was looking to do. (Pulled all three with one of the existing wires, went very cleanly)

    New wires pulled
    monarch_10ee_image_newpowerwirespulled.jpg

    Contactor re-wired
    monarch_10ee_image_newcontactorwiring.jpg

    New box with 65 amp (yep. overkill, but it's what I had around) terminal block.
    monarch_10ee_image_newpowerboxwithwires.jpg

  18. #137
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default Two dis-assembly questions

    In the following image of the chuck holder on the spindle, how do I remove that so I can get the cast iron collar off? I have the six bolts out but it doesn't slide over the chuck holder.

    monarch_10ee_image_checkholder.jpg

    In the next photo, which is the leadscrew collar, how does the loose piece at the end that pins into the leadscrew come off? It seems to have an internal gear that meshes with another on the shaft.

    monarch_10ee_image_leadscrewcollar.jpg

    All help appreciated.

  19. #138
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    31,460
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    9879

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dinotom View Post
    In the following image of the chuck holder on the spindle, how do I remove that so I can get the cast iron collar off? I have the six bolts out but it doesn't slide over the chuck holder.

    monarch_10ee_image_checkholder.jpg
    Surely it does not!

    I have a 10EE spindle out of the lathe, collar still in place.

    You pull the spindle.

    Removed "stuff" from back-end forward. Eventually, it comes out the FRONT, that CI part still on it. Once bearings and such have all been removed, the collar goes down the spindle, toward the aft end. Not forward over the D1 camlock at all.

    There are threads covering it, "Right here, on PM".

    Search using "spindle bearing replacement."

  20. #139
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default

    That’s what I figured but was hoping wasn’t the case.

  21. #140
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    31,460
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    9879

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dinotom View Post
    That’s what I figured but was hoping wasn’t the case.
    I have a horizontal mill where either end and its bearing can be removed independently.

    Convenient for servicing - there are Gilmer belts involved - otherwise, all that does is make it trickier to get preloads right and make positioning a bit less certain, as it relies on BOTH "ends" of the casting rather than referencing off the one end for the whole "stack".

    Thermal expansion as it can be, the 10EE is done "better" and is the way MOST lathe HS are.

    One end - closest to the workload - is the "master datum" reference, the aft end sort of "floating" at least slightly.

    Works well. Has lasted a VERY long time, average 10EE spindle probably coming out about once in every 60 years or more, so "I'm good with that".



Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •