Rivett 1020S - "Center Chuck"
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  1. #1
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    Default Rivett 1020S - "Center Chuck"

    The Rivett doesn't have a morse taper spindle so can't be fitted with a normal center. I thought I read a thread somewhere that there was a device called a "center chuck" which was a center for the spindle. Did I dream this or is this correct? If so, anyone know where I might find one?

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    Never mind. I found the thread.
    Rivett 1020/1030 Center Chuck (1020R-12-658)

    Anyone have one of these they'd like to sell? Along with a draw tube!

    Will a regular MT3 center work in the spindle?

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    Some of the Rivetts came with a MT headstock taper but most came with a taper to fit 6R collets. Getting a 6R to MT conversion collet is fairly rare but apparently doable because some Rivett owners have them.

    If someone has two, I’ll get in line behind Travis.

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    I chuck up a piece of round and turn the 60* point on it. I drive the dog with one of the chuck jaws. It also saves dismounting the chuck when you want to work between centers.

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    Medsar, I definitely have the 6R spindle and need the 6R/MT3 adapter. PM me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Adapter is the word I was looking for. Sigh, English is my first language.

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    So is this correct? In the linked thread the center is a MT3 inside of that collet device? If so the 6R size is a monster.

    I am currently making a tapered bushing for an arbor for my Barber Colman #3 gear hobber with a 1 degree 47' 15" taper on my newly in use Monarch. It looks like you will be using your Rivett to make a center adapter. You don't need to make the threaded portion I wouldn't think. The pressure from your part will hold the 6R taper in place. The taper attachment can make the MT3 part and the compound can make the 20 degree or whatever collet part.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bll230 View Post
    So is this correct? In the linked thread the center is a MT3 inside of that collet device? If so the 6R size is a monster.

    I am currently making a tapered bushing for an arbor for my Barber Colman #3 gear hobber with a 1 degree 47' 15" taper on my newly in use Monarch. It looks like you will be using your Rivett to make a center adapter. You don't need to make the threaded portion I wouldn't think. The pressure from your part will hold the 6R taper in place. The taper attachment can make the MT3 part and the compound can make the 20 degree or whatever collet part.
    Yes, apparently that is what the linked post shows.

    I think you’re right. Pressure from part will hold it.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    I had 3 of these 6R to 3MT adapters.
    I just sold 2 and have one left.
    The bad news is I'll sell it for $8000.
    The good news is I'll throw in the lathe for free but you have to come pick it up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rustytool View Post
    I had 3 of these 6R to 3MT adapters.
    I just sold 2 and have one left.
    The bad news is I'll sell it for $8000.
    The good news is I'll throw in the lathe for free but you have to come pick it up.
    ROFL!

    I'll see that and LOWER rather than raise with a store-bought Stark #12 Jarno DC, "free" 1946 10EE MG lathe in a sad state of bed wear for HALF your number.

    A mere $ 4,000 rolled-out on skates to an easy load-up. I'm keeping the '42 10EE. Less bed wear.


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    Come on! Its a toolmakers lathe, make one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    Come on! Its a toolmakers lathe, make one.
    Startin' to scare me, you and I agree on stuff?




    But there seems to be a "rule".

    We make the damndest and most complex of impossible shapes for a CUSTOMER, but any one among us needs even one INCH of ignorant .250" drill-rod turned seven-thou under?

    If it is for our OWN use? We'll search the whole world for half the year to buy it, rather than make it in half a minute...

    Adaptor wanted here needs more than a few minutes, but even if half the day is faster than FedEx could ever git one to yah.

    Go figure...

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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    Come on! Its a toolmakers lathe, make one.
    Trying to get the lathe to a state where I CAN make stuff with it.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by TravisR100 View Post
    Trying to get the lathe to a state where I CAN make stuff with it.
    Plenty of better sources of advice than this Old Fart, but lemme clue you to one of our worst barriers, all of us..

    See this?

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Shut that evil little f**ker OFF, and go get your hands dirty or not a damned thing ever gets done on the shop floor.

    DAMHIKT. Post count says it all.....


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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    Come on! Its a toolmakers lathe, make one.

    Well played.

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    Since I am on day 3 of making my taper bushing, (the taper is essentially unknown, thus lots of time working to achieve it, wear on mating part etc.) it might be worth spending $170 for a Hardinge collet and then putting a straight diameter center in it.

    Although, functionally, Barber Colman knew what they were doing with taper bushings, adjustable to zero play, unlike straight bronze bushings.

    https://shophardinge.com/productGrid.aspx?catID=1786

    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by bll230 View Post
    Since I am on day 3 of making my taper bushing, (the taper is essentially unknown, thus lots of time working to achieve it, wear on mating part etc.) it might be worth spending $170 for a Hardinge collet and then putting a straight diameter center in it.

    Although, functionally, Barber Colman knew what they were doing with taper bushings, adjustable to zero play, unlike straight bronze bushings.

    https://shophardinge.com/productGrid.aspx?catID=1786

    John
    Yazz, John, but here's an idle thot:

    First, I'd mount the J-35 McGonegal and MAKE that "worn" part as perfect as can be.

    "All manual" shop? Damned if I'd know or care it came-out two-thou under and two degrees off the OEM blueprint I ain't never gonna lay eyes on, regardless.

    But on to the next.

    Still no ability to just punch numbers into a CNC critter?

    Not one damned bit more work to "all manual" mate to one oddball taper and size than it is to mate to a "standard" taper and size, is it? IS NO source for OEM new parts, so what is there to match, right?

    Tedious work, no matter how yah do it, of course.

    But now? Both parts, slightly off OEM or not, DO have a great chance at a dead-nuts mate-up.

    And that's a better bearing than it was when wore out. Factory spec or never.

    Not to mention the coin involved. Beats all Hell out of three large $$$ for a set of hard to find uber-precise angular-contact 10EE BALL bearings, don't it?

    QED.


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    Bill, I thought of that along the way, but the arbor is a taper arbor, so the only mounting surface is 3/4 inch of 5/8 diameter, approx 8 inches from where the end support taper is, and there was way too much flex to get any kind of consistent cut. BC ground all surfaces on the original part.

    If I were working on one of the straight arbors with the taper bushing it might have worked, being able to hold onto a straight surface immediately next to the bushing taper.

    Why am I trying to get my taper arbor useable when I have straight arbors? Increase the number of hobs I can buy off eBay and not pay Ash Gear $400 per hob.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bll230 View Post
    Bill, I thought of that along the way, but the arbor is a taper arbor, so the only mounting surface is 3/4 inch of 5/8 diameter, approx 8 inches from where the end support taper is, and there was way too much flex to get any kind of consistent cut.
    THIS.. is where you cast the sumbich into a material you can turn for serious-good support, shed later.

    Ever see a diamond faceting factory? Belgian Jewish friend had family as still ran a good 'un I visited in Antwerp, couple hundred years ago. Or so it seems by now, 'coz it has probably been "CNC'ed" long-since by a younger generation. Or two.



    Whole buncha tiny record-player like machines, each with a stout Copper wire and what will become a "brilliant" cut diamond's 58 or so lovingly near optically-perfect surfaces. End of that wire? Chunk of brown shellac and one diamond.

    Skill and the simplest of fixturing did the rest. One wise old guy. "Making the rounds" of the whole circus as each stone came ready for the next facet.

    Not hard. Just tedious!


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