Rivett 1020S - Removing the Feed Rod - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Now that I think about it, itís obvious it couldnít slide through even without the built in collar since the splines donít go all the way down the shaft.

    This has quickly become very daunting. Iím not prepared to remove the entire apron at this point.


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  2. #22
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    Can the apron be detached from the saddle without removing the apron front cover?


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    Yes. It's just the 10 socket head cap screws on top holding it on.

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    Default Rivett 1020S - Removing the Feed Rod

    Got it. I now have those screws partially out and after taking off the carriage lock and thread dial itís ready to come off. Iím just not ready for it to come off yet. Iíve got no way at the moment to secure it and move it. Gantry crane coming next week.


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  6. #25
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    I'm wondering what tool or process you are going to use to straighten the rod once you remove it from the apron?

    Depending on the entry/exit passageways in the apron, could you use some either hard wood, or aluminum pieces at the apron where the rod exits, and bend the rod against the apron [and the wood or aluminum pieces if installed].

    When i straighten a rod or shaft that is out of a machine, I use a 5" machine vise with copper jaw inserts. I look down the rod, find the bend, put the rod in the vise and slide a pipe over the rod so the sideways force I put on the pipe bends [straightens] the rod right where it is clamped in the vise.
    I repeat the process many times, until the wiggle and worm is gone from the rod.

    I'm just wondering if the feed rod is held rigidly enough in the apron and if using some wood or aluminum 'wedges' ?? to create a fulcrum point or bend point at the exit of the apron, that you could safely use the apron as the 'vice' to hold the rod for straightening?
    I know it's a bit of a 'hack' method, but depending on the severity of the bend or bends in your feed rod, it might be do-able?

    You probably had already thought about this method, but i thought I'd mention or suggest it,

    Good luck with your project.

    DualValve

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by DualValve View Post
    I'm wondering what tool or process you are going to use to straighten the rod once you remove it from the apron?

    Depending on the entry/exit passageways in the apron, could you use some either hard wood, or aluminum pieces at the apron where the rod exits, and bend the rod against the apron [and the wood or aluminum pieces if installed].

    When i straighten a rod or shaft that is out of a machine, I use a 5" machine vise with copper jaw inserts. I look down the rod, find the bend, put the rod in the vise and slide a pipe over the rod so the sideways force I put on the pipe bends [straightens] the rod right where it is clamped in the vise.
    I repeat the process many times, until the wiggle and worm is gone from the rod.

    I'm just wondering if the feed rod is held rigidly enough in the apron and if using some wood or aluminum 'wedges' ?? to create a fulcrum point or bend point at the exit of the apron, that you could safely use the apron as the 'vice' to hold the rod for straightening?
    I know it's a bit of a 'hack' method, but depending on the severity of the bend or bends in your feed rod, it might be do-able?

    You probably had already thought about this method, but i thought I'd mention or suggest it,

    Good luck with your project.

    DualValve
    A blue wrench works good to.

  8. #27
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    If you mean a 'blue TIP wrench' aka an oxyacetylene torch, I stay away from those unless the metal part needing to be bent has to have a tight radius, and the effects of heat on the metal are not a potential issue.

    For a slight or mild bend such as a feed rod might have if something heavy was dropped on it, or a machine or something ran into the lathe and bent the rod, that time of bend would need gentle and progressive slight 'tweaks; to get straight.
    While the effects of heat on the feed rod might not be a huge problem, for me, i'd not risk it.

    DV

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by DualValve View Post
    If you mean a 'blue TIP wrench' aka an oxyacetylene torch, I stay away from those unless the metal part needing to be bent has to have a tight radius, and the effects of heat on the metal are not a potential issue.

    For a slight or mild bend such as a feed rod might have if something heavy was dropped on it, or a machine or something ran into the lathe and bent the rod, that time of bend would need gentle and progressive slight 'tweaks; to get straight.
    While the effects of heat on the feed rod might not be a huge problem, for me, i'd not risk it.

    DV
    This video will show you how to use a blue tip wrench on a shaft.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by DualValve View Post
    I'm wondering what tool or process you are going to use to straighten the rod once you remove it from the apron?

    Depending on the entry/exit passageways in the apron, could you use some either hard wood, or aluminum pieces at the apron where the rod exits, and bend the rod against the apron [and the wood or aluminum pieces if installed].

    When i straighten a rod or shaft that is out of a machine, I use a 5" machine vise with copper jaw inserts. I look down the rod, find the bend, put the rod in the vise and slide a pipe over the rod so the sideways force I put on the pipe bends [straightens] the rod right where it is clamped in the vise.
    I repeat the process many times, until the wiggle and worm is gone from the rod.

    I'm just wondering if the feed rod is held rigidly enough in the apron and if using some wood or aluminum 'wedges' ?? to create a fulcrum point or bend point at the exit of the apron, that you could safely use the apron as the 'vice' to hold the rod for straightening?
    I know it's a bit of a 'hack' method, but depending on the severity of the bend or bends in your feed rod, it might be do-able?

    You probably had already thought about this method, but i thought I'd mention or suggest it,

    Good luck with your project.

    DualValve
    Thereís a company here in Houston that does shaft straightening. My plan is to take it to them.


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  12. #30
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    Feed rod removed! With the crane now in the shop I was able to remove the apron and the feed shaft.




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  13. #31
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    Aside from being dirty, the back of the apron looks to be in good shape with the exception on the broken gib which I detailed in another post.




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    How about a photo of the feed rod, looking down it's length, showing the bend in it?
    A before and after pair of photos would be interesting too.

    DualValve

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    Default Rivett 1020S - Removing the Feed Rod

    Quote Originally Posted by DualValve View Post
    How about a photo of the feed rod, looking down it's length, showing the bend in it?
    A before and after pair of photos would be interesting too.

    DualValve
    Really hard to capture.



    The bend is at the far end of the picture above.






    The picture directly above probably shows it better than any other. You can almost see it. The two pictures above are the same end of the shaft rotate 180 degrees. You can see in the bottom picture it goes from the collar to almost immediately touching the table.

    I swore I took a video of it turning on the machine which makes it very apparent. But, I canít seem to find it.

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  16. #34
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    After you get the shaft back from the company who is straightening it for you, Iíd be curious to know if they did it cold or flame straightened it.

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    Default Rivett 1020S - Removing the Feed Rod

    Quote Originally Posted by medsar View Post
    After you get the shaft back from the company who is straightening it for you, Iíd be curious to know if they did it cold or flame straightened it.
    Dropped it off this morning. From what he described theyíre doing it cold in some type of press. Requires a special setup because of the splines.


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  18. #36
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    Finally found the video that shows the bend.

    YouTube


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    Feed rod back and lathe back together. Shop told me TIR after straightening was .008. If I look close with it running I can see the slightest wobble. Night and day from what it was before I took it in.


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  20. #38
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    By the way, putting the apron back on was very easy with the crane with two hoists. Donít know how Iíd have done gotten it back together without it.


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