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    I too have a Rivett 1020S which I did some restoration to and a complete disassembly of. I replaced almost all bearings in the entire lathe including the spindle. Regarding your problem with the hum, I had the same noise. On mine the noise was eventually traced to the brake. There are a couple of manual releases on the back of the brake that you can get to with a screw driver which will disengage the brake. That with unwiring it may help you determine if your brake is making the noise.

    The fix was not so simple. After taking the brake apart, the actual brake disc had little wear but needed both metal faces reground. I also took apart the magnetic brake and reground the magnet faces. When the machine is running, the brake is holding open and they chatter even when the gap is set correctly. Regrinding on mine got rid of that problem.

    However, there were other sources of vibration and noise. On mine, all four variable sheaves were not running true. They had some warp - I suppose from sitting for decades. I could put my finger on the inside of each sheave and feel vibration. This produced quite a bit of noise. I took all that apart, refaced the sheaves and checked the balance. I also replaced all belts and bearings and added sound deadening (egg crate foam) to the bottom of the machine. All this coupled with the rest of the bearings in the machine made a tremendous difference in the machine. It is now very quiet.

    I’m currently working on a Monarch 10EE to replace the spindle bearings and a new drive. I have some pictures of Rivett spindle bearings as well as Monarch 10EE spindle bearings along with some particulars that I could post for comparison sake if anyone is interested. I also have pictures of my Rivett which I could also post.

  2. #42
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    And with a helper, I can now definitely say that the noise on start up is definitely coming from the brake and not the motor. Itís pretty easy to hear and feel where itís coming from when Iím able to get down next to it and put a hand on it while someone else is starting and stopping the machine. What exactly is causing it, Iím not sure. I canít see the entire brake apparatus without taking more of it apart.

    Iím not exactly sure how these brakes work. Iíve seen a couple of YouTube videos where the brake disengagement appears to be from the .045Ē of movement of the brake.

    YouTube

    Look at the 1:00 minute mark in the video above. This is almost the exact amount of movement I see on my brake.

    I donít know what the other vibration and noise could be coming from. Obviously something else in the brake mechanism that I canít see. Beyond that little bit of movement that I can see, i donít know whatís going on in the rest of the mechanism.


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  3. #43
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    Default Rivett 1020S - Video and electrical hum question

    Quote Originally Posted by tailstock4 View Post
    I too have a Rivett 1020S which I did some restoration to and a complete disassembly of. I replaced almost all bearings in the entire lathe including the spindle. Regarding your problem with the hum, I had the same noise. On mine the noise was eventually traced to the brake. There are a couple of manual releases on the back of the brake that you can get to with a screw driver which will disengage the brake. That with unwiring it may help you determine if your brake is making the noise.

    The fix was not so simple. After taking the brake apart, the actual brake disc had little wear but needed both metal faces reground. I also took apart the magnetic brake and reground the magnet faces. When the machine is running, the brake is holding open and they chatter even when the gap is set correctly. Regrinding on mine got rid of that problem.

    However, there were other sources of vibration and noise. On mine, all four variable sheaves were not running true. They had some warp - I suppose from sitting for decades. I could put my finger on the inside of each sheave and feel vibration. This produced quite a bit of noise. I took all that apart, refaced the sheaves and checked the balance. I also replaced all belts and bearings and added sound deadening (egg crate foam) to the bottom of the machine. All this coupled with the rest of the bearings in the machine made a tremendous difference in the machine. It is now very quiet.

    Iím currently working on a Monarch 10EE to replace the spindle bearings and a new drive. I have some pictures of Rivett spindle bearings as well as Monarch 10EE spindle bearings along with some particulars that I could post for comparison sake if anyone is interested. I also have pictures of my Rivett which I could also post.
    Funny, I was just making another post saying that Iíve traced this to the brake. Did you look at simply buying a new brake instead of refurbishing the old one?

    Sounds like you put a LOT of work into yours and thank you for replying to this thread. Iíll definitely take any and all pictures youíve got of any part of the Rivett. Where do you suppose my noise is coming from? I really donít hear much noise after itís started up and running. Once itís running, itís kind of like the hum of a coil or solenoid. The big racket is on startup.

    I saw references to a manual release in the Dings literature but couldnít really identify where the release was actually at.


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  4. #44
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    Tailstock4, do you figure my belt is simply worn out? I would think the spring mechanism would take out any slack but it doesnít appear to do so.


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    Quote Originally Posted by TravisR100 View Post
    As to the wear, I just put a .0005” mitutoyo DTI on the cross slide. Between the V way and the flat way in the front. It is a non-bearing machined surface between the load bearing ways. If I run the carriage from the spindle to 2/3 to the rear of the machine, the indicator shows basically no deviation. Not that I can measure without a tenths indicator. If the needle moved, it’s barely .0001.
    Bed won't show much wear on any of the long-carriage "Grand-Old" Toolroom / Tool & Gage lathes.
    It accumulates on the underside of the softer CI carriage.

    To avoid being obligated to sacrificing TWO goats for your great good fortune..


    ... see what moves if you lighten-up on the carriage hold-downs (ball-bearing ones on my 10EE's), then check by alternating about 100 lbs of sandbag to each corner or "wing" in turn. There's usually some "rocking horse" movement. Even so.. it may not be enough to bother your work.

    ...if not.... about that sacrificial goat?

    Step-by-Step Guide to the Perfect Argentine Asado



  6. #46
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    Iíll let you know when I get 100 lbs of sand bags.



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    I assume you mean putting the weight on one corner and looking for lift on any of the 3 other 3 corners with an indicator?


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    I found that new brakes are pretty expensive and mine fortunately could be repaired.

    I would say that the drive is much easier to work on and diagnose if you are able to pull it out first. I lifted it straight out of the back by putting it on one fork of a forklift. Then I set it on saw horses, pulled the start/stop and speed controls out of the front and then wired them back to the drive. I could then run the drive just as if it was in the machine.

    I remembered one more thing about noise. On the back of the motor where the brake attaches to the shaft on the motor, mine was pretty chewed up – both the key and the keyway. I made some new parts and strengthened this area. Every time you push the stop when the machine is running, quite a bit of torque gets transmitted back to the brake. Over time it hammers on it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TravisR100 View Post
    And with a helper, I can now definitely say that the noise on start up is definitely coming from the brake and not the motor. It’s pretty easy to hear and feel where it’s coming from when I’m able to get down next to it and put a hand on it while someone else is starting and stopping the machine. What exactly is causing it, I’m not sure. I can’t see the entire brake apparatus without taking more of it apart.

    I’m not exactly sure how these brakes work. I’ve seen a couple of YouTube videos where the brake disengagement appears to be from the .045” of movement of the brake.

    YouTube

    Look at the 1:00 minute mark in the video above. This is almost the exact amount of movement I see on my brake.

    I don’t know what the other vibration and noise could be coming from. Obviously something else in the brake mechanism that I can’t see. Beyond that little bit of movement that I can see, i don’t know what’s going on in the rest of the mechanism.


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    Stewart-Warner, Dings, and - IIRC Baruffaldi? all published "white papers" (or bragging..) as to how their brakes work and what matters.

    Long story short, there is a solenoid action involved, but also boosted by a servo effect from rotation and usually a spring, hence the partial rotation. The solenoids are air-gap and on-seat when active sensitive - hence the mention of need of precision grinding.

    Less-elegant ones, as used in mowers, are only around a hundred bucks, cheap-sets (ebay). The grade used here, not so cheap, but new parts may still be cheaper than grinding old parts, as they sell the components separately, not just as complete assemblies.

    From experience, I've become a believer in taking them OFF and pitching them in the bin in favour of a separate foot-treadle operated spindle brake one can "feather" usually, come hard-down on only in an emergency.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tailstock4 View Post
    I found that new brakes are pretty expensive and mine fortunately could be repaired.

    I would say that the drive is much easier to work on and diagnose if you are able to pull it out first. I lifted it straight out of the back by putting it on one fork of a forklift. Then I set it on saw horses, pulled the start/stop and speed controls out of the front and then wired them back to the drive. I could then run the drive just as if it was in the machine.

    I remembered one more thing about noise. On the back of the motor where the brake attaches to the shaft on the motor, mine was pretty chewed up Ė both the key and the keyway. I made some new parts and strengthened this area. Every time you push the stop when the machine is running, quite a bit of torque gets transmitted back to the brake. Over time it hammers on it.
    Do you recall what ďpretty expensiveĒ meant?


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    Quote Originally Posted by TravisR100 View Post
    Do you recall what “pretty expensive” meant?


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    I don't recall the price exactly. It has been a while back. I have a surface grinder and was able to do the repairs myself without having to put any money in the brake - just time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TravisR100 View Post
    Do you recall what “pretty expensive” meant?
    Get the make and ID, it can be looked-up. Slow rate of change, and there are cross-references, if even it has gone obsolete, lo these many years, at all. Many have not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TravisR100 View Post
    Tailstock4, do you figure my belt is simply worn out? I would think the spring mechanism would take out any slack but it doesn’t appear to do so.


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    The slack is greatest when the machine is in its low RPM range. It is naturally loose somewhat then. As your speed comes up, tension will increase rapidly provided splines are in good shape and well lubricated (i.e. not sticky grease.) And, yes, a new belt will help.

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    Pictures of my Rivett:
    img_2971.jpg

    img_2972.jpg

    img_2987.jpg

    img_2989.jpg

    img_2974.jpg

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    Good to know. I plan on calling Dings tomorrow to see what a replacement brake would cost.


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    Default Rivett 1020S - Video and electrical hum question

    That is one beautiful machine. I want to get mine mechanically sound first then possibly work on making it look good.


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    I suspect you need a bigger rpc .

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    Quote Originally Posted by TravisR100 View Post
    That is one beautiful machine. I want to get mine mechanically sound first then possibly work on making it look good.


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    I would agree. Painting is the last and least important thing I do - but not necessarily the easiest for me to do well. I was fortunate that my machine was in pretty good shape in regards to wear and accuracy.

    In regards to way wear, I first level the machine and then come back in a few weeks and re-level the machine using a Starrett master precision level. After I'm satisfied that it is level, I take off the compound from the cross-slide and set the level across from front to back on parallels or v-blocks. Starting at one end of the machine, I slowly traverse to the other end stopping to record readings allowing the level to stabilize each time. This can give you a more accurate, real reading of what the cutting tool sees. Of course, in the end what really matters is chucking up a piece and turning something to see what you have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tailstock4 View Post
    Pictures of my Rivett:
    img_2971.jpg

    img_2972.jpg

    img_2987.jpg

    img_2989.jpg

    img_2974.jpg
    Is that on original Rivett turret ?
    Or something adapted?
    Nicest 1020S I've ever seen. And a late model S with the exposed headstock bolts so you don't have to remove the gearbox to get the headstock off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rustytool View Post
    Is that on original Rivett turret ?
    Or something adapted?
    I was wondering the same thing. I haven't heard of an original Rivett turret attachment for the 1020 or 1030 lathes, but we all know about their documentation.


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