Simple, Inexpensive "Universal" WiaD Voltage Conversions
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  1. #1
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    Default Simple, Inexpensive "Universal" WiaD Voltage Conversions

    The usual case of a WiaD is conversion of an industrial 460 volt machine to a residential or commercial or light industrial 230 volt premises.

    The less usual case is conversion of a residential or commercial or light industrial 230 volt machine to a 460 volt premises.

    By making a single cut (wire deletion) and a single component addition (a 2:1 or 1:2 control transformer) both of these changes can be made without further changes to the machine.

    Meaning: no need to track down the "unobtanium" C-H magnetic starter coil, and no need to track down the "unaffordium" C16J and 3C23 filament transformers.

    The first attachment shows the modified WiaD input section and a schematic of the revised wiring which includes the new control transformer, which is a common 230:460 300 V-A unit.

    The second attachment shows the revised WiaD field regulator with the one wire change.

    The third attachment shows the revised WiaD armature regulator with the one wire change.

    This conversion is "universal" in that it may be employed to convert any 230 volt machine to 460 volts, or any 460 volt machine to 230 volts, using the same components.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails revised_wiad_input_section.jpg   revised_wiad_field_supply.jpg   revised_wiad_arm_supply.jpg  

  2. #2
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    The first dwg. shows the coolant pump still receiving the line voltage. To be consistent, the coolant pump should be disconnected unless T is a 3phase transformer.

  3. #3
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    "The first dwg. shows the coolant pump still receiving the line voltage. To be consistent, the coolant pump should be disconnected unless T is a 3phase transformer."

    In the usual case of a B&S 200 coolant pump, the pump motor is 230/460, just as are the two anode transformers.

    This approach is for the drive and the main contactor, only, and not for the coolant pump which needs no adaptation, save the usual change from 460 to 230 or from 230 to 460, as the line power is simply passed-through the C-H contactor and the C-H drum switch from the fusible safety switch to the C.P. motor itself [ * ] .

    New line L1-X feeds only the single-phase components to which it is connected: the C-H contactor coil and the two filament transformers in the WiaD.

    The Monarch schematic is somewhat deceptive in that the STOP side of the heater of O.L. 1 is separated from the START side by the series connection of M and the heater of O.L. 1 . This unusual connection was employed by Monarch designers to free the fourth M contact for use wholly within the WiaD drive itself, between 73A and F1 . Otherwise, a total of four M contacts would be required for the coolant pump and the "three-wire control station". In this unusual arrangement, only three M contacts are required.

    [ * ] Obviously, this is not true for a single-voltage coolant pump. The only C.P.s which I have encountered have been B&S units, and those have been 230/460. Were I to have a single-voltage coolant pump, then I would replace the motor with a single-phase unit of the required voltage. In this case, L3 would not be used at all, and it would be disconnected at the safety switch.

  4. #4
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    The attachment illustrates that the above-described change is minimal, and applies only to the C-H contactor coil, and to the two filament transformers.

    The B&S coolant pump is not affected.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails redlined_wiad_input_section.jpg  

  5. #5
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    I did this conversion.
    Everything seems to work

    question - what about the CTs?
    my schematic says the secondary of the CTs should have 80volts
    I'm getting 24-27 volts

    I don't know what it effects
    one member suggested a shunt wire across the CT primary 20"long piece of #14awg wire.
    His Modular schematic had a note about the shunt

    I tried it. Secondary voltage dropped to about 10-12volts
    I didn't notice any other change in the performance of the machine

    I have plenty of torque at low speed of around 300rpm in high gear
    any lower spindle speed and the motor cycles on and off

    high speed 3250rpm

    should i leave it alone or spend more time on this?

    Thanks


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