Some advice needed for a member seeking a 10EE - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Andrew-t,
    Here is what I would do when looking at that lathe:
    I would ask to hear it run, so hopefully it is hooked up to power.
    Find out if it is a 230volt or 440volt 3-phase lathe.
    IF it is not under power, and the seller does not know what voltage it is set up for, Then you have to either do some searching on the lathe yourself, and maybe the seller won't let you.
    Usually, a seller wants the item sold, so he will be very helpful.
    Take the front door or panel off the base of the lathe.. This is the panel right in front of your toes when operating the lathe. The two knobs turn about 1/2 turn, there are two pins in the bottom corners of the panel,, the panel weighs maybe 10#, don't drop it and break it. .
    Bring a good flashlight with you, and look at the specification/maker's plate on the lathe, on an early 10ee, it is usually to the left of the rectangular wire connection box. usually a brass plate on the curved exterior of the AC motor. If the badge shows two different voltages then the lathe can be either 220 or 440. Some AC motors are 440v only. if the motor plate does not show a 220v and amperage, the motor is solely 440v.

    Read this thread, it explains with photos what i just wrote:

    10EE MG 440 to 220 Conversion Checklist

    You can buy a 220v transformer to bump up your shop 220v to 440v. but this is an extra expense..

    Next you want to look at the bed/carrraige wear as discussed earlier in this thread.
    You can look at the sides of the front 'V' way, to see if there are scores and obviously worn areas like Donnie showed.
    And you can look at the saddle where it sits just above the tailstock's flat-way.
    In the photo, the plated cover for the felt 'way-wiper' has been removed, jus two straight slotted screws. This exposes the
    gap [hopefully] between the bottom of the saddle and the top of the tailstock flat-way.
    Bring a good 1/4" wide blade straight screwdriver and a set of feeler gauges.. So you only have to ask the seller to allow you
    to remove the two screws and set the wiper aside..
    Then see if you can slide a .002" or thicker, up to maybe .010" feeler in the gap.
    As shown in the photo.
    Supposedly a new 10ee had between 008"-.010" clearance, these numbers are what I have read here on PM.
    If the late has any clearance with the saddle in the roughly 10" in the center of it's left/right travel, then you at least don't have a seriously worn lathe, unless 'remedial' efforts were done on the saddle like i showed in my previous post.

    I would also read some threads here on PM, they will give you some understanding of the 10ee.

    New to me Monarch 10EE just arrived!

    Regarding the MG drive, it works very well, is simple in principle, and is quite robust, but it takes some 'understanding' and some 'hands on' time to get comfortable with it.. I prefer this simple, almost primitive system to a circuit board with glowing vacuum tubes, condensers, transformers resistors and circuitry,, That stuff give me a headache..

    DualValve
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails feelergaugeundersaddle.jpg  

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  3. #22
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    Thanks you, all, for the continued suggestions. I have asked on Thursday 19th to inspect the lathe on Saturday the 21st, but I got no response. The last response, where I asked about the cover was:

    "Sir I cannot find the cover the person I need to ask is my poppa, but he died 6 months ago , I dont trust the wiggy board thang ,lol"

    So, that's where we are at the moment. I am not sure this person wants to sell this thing, or seems like he wants someone to buy at full-price sight-unseen. I am certainly not going to do that.

  4. #23
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    at that price, the risk is minimal, because the machine can be parted out and sold, a hassle yes, but......

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    Tell the seller you are proficient in weege board, and are willing to bring one into the shop to help find the missing parts.

  7. #25
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    It looks like someone else bought it. If you are here, let us know how it turned out! Thanks for all of the help. I am going to keep my eye out for another, and probably a few other brands, and in the mean time, I am going to look into my city's "hacker-space", where they have a lathe I think I can learn on.

  8. #26
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    The lathe was at least reasonably priced, and it was also close to you. Both are important if you are going to have to put time and parts into a machine.
    Regardless of price, a seller should give a potential buyer what information they ask for, or allow a personal inspection.
    It's a shame that the seller didn't allow you to inspect it..

    There are plenty of lathes around, some good, some terrible, some priced right, some priced ridiculously high. Just keep looking, one you can be happy with will show up.

    DualValve

  9. #27
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    Default Given the opportunity...

    Given the opportunity to buy a Monarch 10EE for anything under oh... $2000...

    If the spindle spins, and nothing on the outside appears broken, the ways aren't chewed up or damaged so bad that the carriage won't traverse... if the leadscrew/shafts aren't bent or broken...

    Buy it.

    Don't worry about the drive. If it's an MG, it can be fixed, and driven off a homemade RPC, or converted to run on single via the "Steelman" method that Peter Haas explained in sticky on the Monarch main page... or you can fit it with a VFD. I've done the RPC and then VFD, and yeah, the DC drive is silky smooth, but mine had enough problems that going VFD made sense for what I needed to do, and I have absolutely NO regrets.

    Consider for a moment, the average price of a South Bend 9. Everybody loves them because they're robust little buggers that two strong men can easily carry into your basement. Expect $1500 for a good one.

    Now compare that to the same pricetag for a Monarch 10EE... Mine came to me for $750 on a government auction oh... 25ish years ago. It's condition was listed as 'uneconomical to repair'. It was not under power, was identified as 'missing some parts', and had a rusty 4-jaw Cushman. I bought it without ever seeing it in person.

    It was well over 3000lbs, I had a Jeep Cherokee and a 16ft utility trailer good for 5000lbs. Oh, and I won a Bridgeport J-head mill under the same circumstances. I had to pay a rigger's fee that seemed kinda steep... but looking at other auctions NOW... it wasn't so bad.

    Neither machine worked when I got them. I didn't have three phase. I learned how to build an RPC because of this. The 10EE was missing a tool post, needed a 230v starter coil, troubleshooting, and other problems. The coolant pump was cooked, wouldn't reverse. The carriage drive wouldn't move either... the belt that drove it was in 4" pieces in the bottom of the machine's belly. I found a short-enough serpentine belt to take the original's place. When I finally got it running, the gearbox leaked so bad that the drive belt would NEVER stay on. At the first hint of slip, it spat it right off, so I used the machine for six years with BOTH belt covers off. There was a black stripe up the garage wall from that automatic belt oiler (sigh).

    It cut GREAT... it did things that my little Atlas-Craftsman could NEVER do. On my WORST day, it made parts better than a well-experienced machinist would do on his best days.

    It was the best $750 I ever spent. It would've been fair at TWICE the price.

    So next time you have opportunity to get a 10EE, don't hesitate. As long as it's not busted-to-heck and missing really critical stuff... if the spindle turns and the gear teeth aren't in the bottom of the sump, call it good and abscond with it to your shop.

    If you hafta yank the belt off, and mount a pully below the spindle connected to a roto-tiller engine... or an old bench grinder motor, or whatever, you'll STILL have more of a machine than anything you'd find in a 'small shop. lathe. Mine came from Oak Ridge National Labs... it was originally shipped to "Ford Motor Company"... the address was a railroad siding in the middle of nowhere in Tennessee. They used it to cut go/no go gauges for plutonium fuel slugs. They never used an SB9 for that.

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