Surface grinder question for 10EE
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  1. #1
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    Default Surface grinder question for 10EE

    I recently realized the usefulness of a surface grinder and I now have a Boyar Schultz 6-12 I am working on.

    I thought of this issue when I was working on my 10EE. My taper attachment slide vertical surfaces are slightly galled/worn from years of the little ball bearings not rolling and rubbing on them I am sure. Would it be practical to put the TA piece on the mag chuck and use the side face of the grinder wheel to clean them up, or are surface grinders only used for grinding on the outer rim of the grinding wheel?

    Looking forward to getting the grinder refurbed to have a new toy to play with.

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    The OD of the wheel is best for most grinding. To stand a part on edge or the part side is common with using the OD of the whaal. Doing this it is good to know the take needed to come off that part and mark the part so you can run an indicator along the to be ground side to know all is set properly....To stand a part on its side and have an angle dressed to the wheel bottom is also a good practice.

    But yes you can use the side of the wheel or a dressed angle on the wheel bottom.
    The Side of the wheel is the direction of the wheel with the least strength. Very much care and caution needed with using a wheel's side.

    Likely a wheel less than 3/4 thick the wheel may/will tend to bend ..and you know grinding wheels don't like to bend with not breaking.

    A bar clamped to an angle plate and a bar dresser is common to dress and angle to the bottom of a wheel.
    *Take care to not heat warp/burn a long part. Likely a 46 gt wheel might be good and some coolant.
    long parts love to warp.....darn.

    *[U]For a new guy to surface Grinding I suggest to Not do any side of the wheel grinding[/U].
    Last edited by michiganbuck; 02-13-2021 at 07:19 AM.

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    Arrow Surface Grinding the side of a part

    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    The OD of the wheel is best for most grinding. To stand a part on edge or the part side is common with sing the OD of the wheel. Doing this it is good to know the take needed to come off that part and mark the part so you can run an indicate along the to be ground side to know all is set properly....To stand a part on its side and have an angle dressed to the wheel bottom is a good practice.

    But yes you can use the side of the wheel or a dressed angle on the wheel bottom.
    The Side of the wheel is the direction of the wheel least strength. Very much care and caution needed with using a wheel's side.

    Likely a wheel less than 3/4 thick the wheel may/will tend to bend ..and you know grinding wheels don't like to bend with not breaking.

    A bar clamped to an angle plate and a bar dresser is common to dress and angle to the bottom of a wheel.
    *Take care to not heat warp/burn a long part. Likely a 46 gt wheel might be good and some coolant.
    long parts love to warp.....darn.

    *[U]For a new guy to surface Grinding I suggest to Not do any side of the wheel grinding[/U].
    Dress the side of the wheel with a slight relief (.003 or .004); stopping just as you come very close to the outer edge of the wheel. Feed down and not sideways. Use a 38A80I8VBE or 38A100K8VBE; depending on how sharp a corner you need at the bottom of cut. Feed .0002 to .0003 down-feed at a time. A niece sharp dressing diamond always helps. Do Clamp Your Part to an angle-plate to support it standing up.
    I suggest grinding the chuck back-gage first, using the same method above.

    All The Best
    Roger

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    Quote Originally Posted by bll230 View Post
    and use the side face of the grinder wheel
    They make "cup" wheels that fit SG's. They'll take face-of-the-cup-rim loading. Of course. But now your fine-feed is on the unhandy axis and you also have to have a care as to circumfrential loading.

    No free lunch.

    Abrasives are friable & frangible ELSE they "don't".
    Abrade.

    Classical Weldon-Roberts "brightboy" is tough.
    But them's more for looks than for precision fits.

    More better to fixture the work to suit "the usual" orientation of the wheel.
    ELSE send it off to he who has a more appropriate grinder.

    Basic 5-10, 6-12, 6-18 SG's are kinda like water-biscuits.

    Put lots of interesting small chow on 'em, but won't never be no sit-down dinner for a royal banquet.

    Yah need one of the "Big Boy" grinders for that. Looong bed, lots of depth and height, tilting head, yadda yadda..

    And a grinder pilot flying it who actually knows his s**t.

    "Page TWO"..

    Any item being worked on as is "unobtanium?"

    Most bestest idea that it DOES go under the hand of an expert. Too DAMNED hard to replace if borked by an amateur.

    IOW: Send it out. Use the 6-12 for... "small chow" AKA "hors d'oeuvres" for those who honk, sing, and fart a "language" through their Gallic noses.


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    For once I agree with Thermite. The fact that you asked the question shows that you are in way over your head. Everyone has to start somewhere and there is no shame in admitting that you don't know what you are doing. Get the advice of someone who has slid down the razor blade of life and left his failures behind.

    Bill

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    I definitely don’t know what I am doing with a SG, I didn’t even know what they did until Everetteengineer ground some spacers flat for me. Then I realized, that could be useful. Thanks for the advice, obviously won’t be trying side face grinding on anything for a while, I’ll stick with spacers....

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    Od also ask how often you are likely to need a taper attachment that is as perfect as the original. If the answer is I dont know then stone off the highs and fix it when it comes up.

    Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk

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    Re: The part + the taper bar

    I would have to see the part needing grinding to be sure. The most practical procedure would be to set the part on the chuck with the need to grind side pointing straight up to face the wheel bottom/OD. It would be clamped to such as 123 blocks to assure a true right-angle to the chuck and be top checked to see that the original manufactured *angle was matched. The grinder trave tried to be sure the long travel could make it all the way across the part. if the part was placed off/above the chuck a same-height shim would be placed about every 6" to assure a solid foundation. An open-wheel perhaps 36 or 46 would be used wet and light cuts with a pause at ends off the part to keep cool.
    Because of the chance to warp an important part only an experience grinder hand should have the job. The heat-trat of the part may cause relief of stresses so even the best grinding may need grinding off the opposite side or straightening.

    A ful length long travel would be best, but an experienced grinder hand could perform the job with moving the part to make full length in two grinds.

    * with not matching the same angle the wheel bottom would be angle dressed or shims would be pace under the 123 blocks and the support under part spacer be made.

    Foe finishing the part needs to be dead cold so a very fine spark out is needed and it can only become as flat as the grinder ways can produced.


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