"W" series identification help
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  1. #1
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    Default "W" series identification help

    I am researching Monarch lathes and am wondering what model this is and what the main characteristics are. It's a little tough to search on the letter "W".

    I read a discussion here concerning a "CW" model but it was not clear to me if the C was inferred?

    Here is the plate on the lathe...

    monarch-w.jpg

    Here is what it looks like...

    monarch-w-2.jpg

    Thanks in advance

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    You might browse through VintageMachinery.org's monarch literature:
    vintagemachinery.org/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id=2103&tab=3
    Unfortunately the I'm not able to connect there right now, the site may be down, or my internet connection may be at fault.

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    Hmmm... Yeah it is not working for me either.

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    It may be something to do with being raised in the sand? That lathe has some more swing than the original base version, see the tail and crossslide.

    Steve

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    I see what you mean about the swing, did not notice that, thanks. But, what the heck does "raised in the sand" mean? Is that like growing up in the desert?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deude-Mann View Post
    I see what you mean about the swing, did not notice that, thanks. But, what the heck does "raised in the sand" mean? Is that like growing up in the desert?
    Raised in the sand means the casting boxes are altered. Sand casting are how the parts are cast.

    Steve

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    C means - loosely - tool room. W was almost there initially, was given a C later even though without lead screw reverse on apron

    Brochure before adding C designation

    scan-01.jpgscan-02.jpgscan-03.jpg

    Surely by now it is well known that MOST serious lathes made in the USA in that period were "raised swing" lathes - like 18 1/2 on a catalog size 16"

    My CW 16 X 102 is a one owner before me from August 1946. Houston Power & Light paid $5775 for it

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    johnoder thanks for that brochure, that lists the specs in detail.

    Not having the lead screw reverse on the apron, I can see how that could be annoying. But then again the distance between centers is pretty short (so short reach) and if it were fitted with a DRO it might not be a big deal anyway. Thoughts?

    One other question though... Why is that guy trying to operate the lathe from the back side?

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    Why is that guy trying to operate the lathe from the back side?
    I'll guess he is doing what he was told to by the photography boss

    As you can find out - if you are brave - the head stock lead screw reverse works - if a bit less handy - just like the one on the apron. As long as the spindle is going sort of slow you can reverse the lead screw or feed rod without stopping the spindle. Though being too timid to try it myself - I do not know if it has a neutral position like the apron rig found on such as the CY

    If you would like the very slim CW manual it can be emailed if you would like to Private Message me that address with Monarch W for a subject line

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deude-Mann View Post
    I am researching Monarch lathes and am wondering what model this is and what the main characteristics are. It's a little tough to search on the letter "W".

    I read a discussion here concerning a "CW" model but it was not clear to me if the C was inferred?

    Here is the plate on the lathe...

    monarch-w.jpg

    Here is what it looks like...

    monarch-w-2.jpg

    Thanks in advance
    The "C" stood for toolroom lathe. So a model "W" was the standard 16" lathe and a "CW" was a toolroom equipped 16" "W" lathe.

    From the second picture, the base of the tailstock and the cross slide both look taller than standard, so it does appear this lathe was "raised in the sand" - its swing increased by raising the castings.

    John


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