Auto Power Off Air Compressor
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  1. #1
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    Default Auto Power Off Air Compressor

    Hello,

    We have purchased a 6 pallet pool horizontal. With all pallets loaded, the machine will run between 9PM and 1AM We are currently running it a little shorter than possible and running up to the shop to turn off the compressor. I was hoping some others could share how they have handled a way for the machine to signal the compressor to shut off.

    I have thought about using an Arduino board to signal to the compressor to turn off when the machine is done. I have found an M-code that signals a relay. I also know the compressor has an input for On/Off (Kaiser).

    I was hoping to hear some other ideas.

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    Simple timer?

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    Quote Originally Posted by wishin4snow View Post
    Hello,

    We have purchased a 6 pallet pool horizontal. With all pallets loaded, the machine will run between 9PM and 1AM We are currently running it a little shorter than possible and running up to the shop to turn off the compressor. I was hoping some others could share how they have handled a way for the machine to signal the compressor to shut off.

    I have thought about using an Arduino board to signal to the compressor to turn off when the machine is done. I have found an M-code that signals a relay. I also know the compressor has an input for On/Off (Kaiser).

    I was hoping to hear some other ideas.
    I think I'm missing something. If you have an M code fired relay on the machine, and you have some type of input on the Kaiser, it should just be a matter of finding whatever the Kaiser on/off input wants to see (5VDC? 24VDC?) and setting up your M code relay to output that voltage. Right?

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    Most compressors will have a low current switch to turn them on[IWO not a big 3 phase Frankenstein switch]

    you can interrupt that circuit with a simply relay.

    that relay can be fired by an M function, or the circuit that turns the light on top of the Christmas tree, or.....

    If you wanna get fancy, have that relay enabled by the light switch so that it only comes into play when you shut the lights off

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    If compressor has a magnetic starter then stupid simple.

    Get some relays and loop the control wire between pressure switch and starter through the contacts.

    Why few?

    We have a relay on ours with 120 vac coil and it has standard cord.

    We added an outlet near compressor controlled by light switch.

    Turn off lights and compressor off.

    Also have solenoid aur valve on tank.

    You can locate either an existing active voltage or code one to provide closure or voltage and use that.

    We highly suggest getting a new relay and socket, din rail if machine has it, and having this relay coil controlled by machine.

    Use the contacts of relay to either provide a closure for the compressor or provide a voltage to operate the compressor relay.

    Also add switch in compressor may starter to bypass relay, a DPDT OFF in middle allows normal.off.remote control.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

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    Doesn't the compressor have a pressure control switch to shut it down? Or does it just use an unloader valve and keep turning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Doesn't the compressor have a pressure control switch to shut it down? Or does it just use an unloader valve and keep turning.

    Smarter controls do both, will run on unload-er then switch off after X amount of no demand - unload-er run time. then seamlessly restart if pressure gets low. Far easier way to go and its a pretty simple module you can add to most compressors. Like this its not tied to anything else as you expand stuff or change things around in the future.

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    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    Smarter controls do both, will run on unload-er then switch off after X amount of no demand - unload-er run time. then seamlessly restart if pressure gets low. Far easier way to go and its a pretty simple module you can add to most compressors. Like this its not tied to anything else as you expand stuff or change things around in the future.
    Yup, unless the Op has many leaks in the building.....

    So if he/she does, and shuts it off at 1:00 am, comes back at 7:00 am and fires it up, how long to fill up the building piping ?

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    So thats a bad idea because of other faults??????

    If you have leaks surely they need fixing, you would not accept leaking plumbing, why the fuck accept leaking air?

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    IMO a timer or relay tied back to the machine is good, but also need to fix leaks. Leaks are going to cost you money in the long run, but you still want the compressor off if no-one is using it as an air connection could fail and you'll show up in the morning to find the compressor has been running non-stop all night while bleeding out.

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    I fixed an air leak at a company where I worked when I became the manager and had listened to it for about 18 months. Electric bill dropped fro $600 to $300 for ONE leak!

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    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    So thats a bad idea because of other faults??????

    If you have leaks surely they need fixing, you would not accept leaking plumbing, why the fuck accept leaking air?
    Because they don't see it....

    I agree they are bad, however I had a maint guy for a foundry tell
    me he starts (2) 50 hp compressors every morning.
    (1) to take care of the leaks, the second to supply the shop with air.

    So that is the mentality going on.

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    For those owners.... talk to your power company. At least here in the TVA region, they will come in once a year for a sniffer survey to help you find air leaks. It is amazing how many will pop up in a year in a large facility. All are tagged and fixed in the following weeks, but every year there are new ones found. I believe this is an incentivized program.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Because they don't see it....

    I agree they are bad, however I had a maint guy for a foundry tell
    me he starts (2) 50 hp compressors every morning.
    (1) to take care of the leaks, the second to supply the shop with air.

    So that is the mentality going on.
    Sounds like where I work lol

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    One method to avoid messing with any of the control circuitry:

    - Voltage sensor on the machine, after the main disconnect. If the machine has APF, voltage will be zero after shutoff
    - Arduino detects the 0 voltage, shuts off normally-closed air solenoid valve entering machine
    - When machine is powered back on, Arduino opens the valve

    If your machine's spindle has a constant hissing sound when powered on, the spindle is probably under positive pressure. Sometimes it's a good idea to have a 20-30 minute timer to allow the spindle to cool down after the last cycle before shutting off the air.

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    Overthinking it. You do NOT need any special Mcode. All you need is a voltage reference being sent to the compressor from machine. Pick ANYTHING. Personally, I would just go right to the source, a PSU and MAKE SURE YOU FUSE IT!

    Here is the way that works. As Orange mentioned, you need to let machine cool at idle for a bit. That might be a G4 P15., then whatever M code to shut machine down. that kills the main contactor and everything powered inside it. That reference voltage you were pulling is now dead.

    All you would then need is a simple toggle switch on the compressor to move from standard mode to "lights out" mode where it would then be in powered up status based on that voltage from the machine.

    I don't know your compressor and a simple model won't do it. You will have to look at the wiring and make a plan. It could all be done in 1hr.


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