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  1. #21
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    Probably, but others are asking for more

    And if he is serious about this, he will come back in a couple of years and reread this..

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    I will bet that the OP is confused with all this fancy talk and controllers.
    Sadly yes Bob .....If I don't ask ....I'll never know

    @ Motion Guru : Thanks fella , you answered my question(s) perfectly & lost me in the dust a few replies ago . I'll be actively searching for a 5000 outfit with the goodies you described

    @ SS_user thanks for the link/info & it appears I have more reading to do


    regards
    SJ

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  4. #23
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    If you would like to learn some practical motion technology that you can then integrate with a Rockwell PLC that involves drives / motors for positioning applications in a plant or synchronized drives with superimposed moves . . . that kind of thing. I would recommend the following:

    Control-Techniques M750 Drive . . . it has the following features:
    • built in motion controller that is capable, well documented and easy to learn
    • built in communications gateway that will talk Ethernet/IP to Rockwell PLCs (as well as Modbus TCP/IP, ProfiNet, etc.)
    • will run ANY servo or AC induction motor you can connect to it with a universal feedback channel that will take encoders, resolvers, etc.


    You can also power this drive up with a 115VAC outlet through a control power transformer (120:480) if you buy a 480V drive or (120:240) if you buy a 240V drive . . . or you can put it in "elevator" mode and power it up from a 48VDC power supply connected to the DC bus.

    From this platform you can learn about drives, motion control, PLC communications, etc. using well documented (English as a native language) manuals and free software.

    Once you get that nailed down, then you connect your PLC, write code to the Control bits and words, and ready status from the status bits and words and you are ready to go.

    If you are going to learn from scratch - this will give you the most bang for the buck.

    Early in my career I put two systems in around Mississauga Ontario . . . a flying knife at a Domtar plant and a Muhr Strip machine at a Sonoco plant (the little white strip on a frozen juice container that you peel off to get the steel lid off . . . )

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  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by motion guru View Post

    Here is a recent 32 axis motion system totaling roughly 200kW of power the largest of which is a 100kW motor. Kinetix 5900 drives over CIP motion controlled from a GuardLogix PLC . . . most ACVector motors with 2million+ count per revolution encoders running in closed loop position control. A few open loop AC motors, a few servos, and a few ACVector motors with 4096 count / rev quadrature encoders. This is a retrofit for a Kirkland brand bath tissue winder capable of 2500 fpm continuous operation.

    Google Photos

    Attachment 306123
    That's...uh....insane!!

    I'm trying to figure out how you could use 32 axes to wind up toilet paper. (Not doubting you whatsoever.....)

    I can unwind TP in the dark, half-asleep, and twisting backwards, with just one arm......

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  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChipSplitter View Post
    That's...uh....insane!!

    I'm trying to figure out how you could use 32 axes to wind up toilet paper. (Not doubting you whatsoever.....)

    I can unwind TP in the dark, half-asleep, and twisting backwards, with just one arm......

    Well at one end of the line you have 4 each 7000 lb rolls of Tp 138 inches wide . . . only two of them spinning at any given time except when transferring from an expiring roll to a new roll. In the middle you are embossing them together, and at the other end you are putting in perforations, winding them on cores (that you inserted, glued, and spun up to a surface speed of 2500fpm) . . . add some means to hit the perf with a knife every nnn sheets, and the ability to add a few sheets if the rolls get too soft, and then also, you have to get the completed rolls out of the machine, glue the tails, and do all of this flawlessly every 3 seconds or so. And if you do have a blow out, you have to auto-thread the system which is a complete sub-system all itself. And do all this safely, in a manner that is coordinated with downstream equipment . . . lots of things going on!

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  10. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by motion guru View Post
    Well at one end of the line you have 4 each 7000 lb rolls of Tp 138 inches wide . . . only two of them spinning at any given time except when transferring from an expiring roll to a new roll. In the middle you are embossing them together, and at the other end you are putting in perforations, winding them on cores (that you inserted, glued, and spun up to a surface speed of 2500fpm) . . . add some means to hit the perf with a knife every nnn sheets, and the ability to add a few sheets if the rolls get too soft, and then also, you have to get the completed rolls out of the machine, glue the tails, and do all of this flawlessly every 3 seconds or so. And if you do have a blow out, you have to auto-thread the system which is a complete sub-system all itself. And do all this safely, in a manner that is coordinated with downstream equipment . . . lots of things going on!

    I feel good when the wire EDM threads itself successfully.

    Now I feel inadequate.

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