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  1. #121
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    Thanks, somewhere in the 111-113 range looked promising. I'm trying to button it back up temporarily, and I'm not making any progress. I gotta find some stickier grease for the shift forks.

    Mine is on steel risers, 5" dia x 4" tall. Divot for the leveling feet in the top. It was on them at the auction, the rigger threw them in the chip pan at my request. I'm about 5-7, and it seems good to me. Some might think it too high, but I gotta use a magna-visor a lot nowadays.

  2. #122
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    Hmm, so a 119 is 2.62 x 15.08 ID (.594") and 20.32 OD (.800"). And the -113 is .103 x .549 ID (.755 OD).

    And the shaft is 16mm (.630") with an 11.4mm (.448")groove.

    ????????

    I got the cover back on. Was just about to the point I couldn't hold it up anymore. Grease wouldn't work. One of the fork shafts had a center punch mark on it, presumably to tighten it up. So I punched the rest. Pulling the big plugs doesn't give you much to look at, but it's better than nothing. That's assuming you can hold the cover up while on your knees on a concrete floor. It doesn't look like there's an issue that caused the wear on the shift fork for IN/MM though.

    And I get to do it again, after I get sealant and a couple o-rings. I'm just gonna do the easy ones. The feed selector is up pretty high so I'm gonna hope it doesn't leak too much.

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  4. #123
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    Per your question this is how our lathe is leveled..

    I am sure it is not leveled and that will be checked later on.

    Any way here is an image of what we have...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails imag0263.jpg   imag0262.jpg  

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  6. #124
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    Noam's risers look like some I have from a Sodick EDM, except they're green. Too low for you though, maybe 3-1/2 to 4" at a guess.

    The leveling screws on mine are hollow, to allow bolting through to the foundation per the manual. I see no reason why that couldn't be a 2 stage setup, riser anchored to the floor, lathe to riser. It probably wouldn't hurt mine to go that way, as it isn't really 'level' on the bed with the front tailstock end screw barely snugged up. Still some twist that could be pulled out. The slab I *had* it on might have been adequate, the one now is ... well ... The next one *WILL* be more than adequate.

    I spent some time studying the Parker O-ring Handbook, looking at typical stretch and compression values for o-rings in this size range. Based on that, I decided to try a -111 on the feed box shafts. A -112 would be loose in the shaft groove. The -111 has a bit less stretch and compression than a typical static seal, but I think that will be ok since it's a rotating joint. Too much compression and they get chewed up. It isn't really designed properly to begin with, you generally want the groove in the housing, not the shaft. But it's mostly static so I don't think it makes any practical difference. And the numbers look about right for a dynamic sliding application.

    Found 2 Metric seals that look about perfect for the inspection plugs and sight windows. We'll see how this all works out. If I can't stop the leaks I may just get a buddy of mine to fab me up a stainless tray to set the whole damn thing in ;-)

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    I think you are wrong, I think you should take the AS586-113

    I think that the 111 is way too small.

    It should seal between the groove and the face plate. If you take the 111 you
    are stretchering it way too much so it actually looses some if its thickness.

    Its up to you...

  8. #126
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    Yeah, we'll see. If I'm wrong, I'm out 5 bucks and shipping. And won't get it back together next weekend. I've got mill work to do anyway.

    The problem with the 113 is that it's ID is about .100 larger than the groove in the shaft. So it'll go on really easy, but I'd never get it compressed so the shaft can be inserted.

    As far off as it is, I'm wondering if they changed the diameter of these shafts at some point and my manual isn't correct. Or, the 119 they spec would be correct if the groove was in the housing and the shaft was solid. Possibly they used a c'bore on the inside face instead.

  9. #127
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    Just buy a couple of sizes and see what works best
    The cost is in the shipping Not the actual O-rings

    Peter

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  11. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by wesg View Post
    Noam's risers look like some I have from a Sodick EDM, except they're green. Too low for you though, maybe 3-1/2 to 4" at a guess.

    The leveling screws on mine are hollow, to allow bolting through to the foundation per the manual. I see no reason why that couldn't be a 2 stage setup, riser anchored to the floor, lathe to riser. It probably wouldn't hurt mine to go that way, as it isn't really 'level' on the bed with the front tailstock end screw barely snugged up. Still some twist that could be pulled out. The slab I *had* it on might have been adequate, the one now is ... well ... The next one *WILL* be more than adequate.
    Wes,
    I'm finalizing my design, but I'm basically planning on a 6" riser bolted to the floor. The riser consists of an 8x11 3/16" plate that will be bolted to the floor. A 3/8" walled 5"x5" square tube with a 3/4" top plate will be welded to the base. The 3/4" top plate is drilled and tapped to receive a 1/2"-13 bolt through the leveling feet.

    Here's the stack of stuff before I weld it together:
    img_0376.jpg
    Evan

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  13. #129
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    Here are the finished risers. One of the lathe leveling bolts is totally chowdered (it can only be unscrewed about 2 full turns--the bottom of the bolt is bent at about 30 degree like somebody dropped the lathe on that bolt), so I'm figuring out how to deal with that. The other 3 are fine.
    img_0399.jpg
    img_0398.jpg

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  15. #130
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    Hmm, sawzall? You've got a lathe to make a new one. And the best part is, you can flick it right into metric, turn the threading brake on, and cut right up to a shoulder, back out, and reverse :-)

    Got mine buttoned back up, mostly. The -111 o-rings are just about perfect. Using a gauge pin to pick them up, the new ones are .025 smaller on the ID. The next up, -112, are .063 bigger. And the o-ring for the sight glass is about perfect too.

    o-ring_graz.jpg

    I studied the manual a bit last week, looking at how the feed mechanism is put together. Looking at it in person today, I figured what the hell.

    feed_cam_graz.jpg

    Main thing is to keep the forks engaged in the cam plate. A little levering with a screw driver was necessary. The inch/metric rack can be positioned so the housing slips past it.

    Gonna let the sealant on the cover and drain fittings cure overnight, and maybe see how fast the fresh oil pours out of it tomorrow ;-)

    If I ever have to do this again, I think I'll mill the cover plate for an o-ring.

    McMaster #'s for the metric o-rings: Sight glass (2.62 x 20.63 ID), 9262K976. Inspection plug (3.53 x 49.21 ID), 9262K27.

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  17. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by wesg View Post
    Hmm, sawzall? You've got a lathe to make a new one. And the best part is, you can flick it right into metric, turn the threading brake on, and cut right up to a shoulder, back out, and reverse :-)
    What do you mean by "threading brake"? I was planning to thread with the spindle in reverse, but maybe there's a better way?

  18. #132
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    The rotary switch on the console, with the thread looking symbol next to it. It engages an automatic brake when the spindle is turned off. So if you've got a relief groove, or just feel comfortable cranking the cross slide out at the end, you get to the end of the thread and turn the spindle off. 'Thunk', and it's not turning anymore. Assuming it's working ... ;-) Metric threads require reversing the spindle to stay in sync by keeping the half nuts engaged at the same place, with various ways of accomplishing it. This makes it simple, just leave them engaged the whole time. Make sure you've got the tool completely clear of the thread before reversing, as there is backlash in the half nuts and lead screw, so it won't follow the thread back. Carbide inserts hate that ...

    There's some delay to the brake disengaging, you can hear it buzz for awhile. But you can just flick the thing straight to reverse, wait it out, and it will start up backwards when it's ready. Just make sure you remembered to withdraw the tool. And don't turn it back to forward accidently.

    And in case you're wondering, no, I have no actual experience with any of those f'ups ... ;-)

    Almost forgot, switching to metric reverses all the feed directions, as it runs the drive 'backwards' through the feed box gears. Which is why the charts go the opposite direction, fast to slow, top to bottom.

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  20. #133
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    Wes,
    I wondered what that switch was for! I don't remember seeing any description of that feature in the manual.

    It seems like something that is easy and safe to try without threading.

    Thanks,
    Evan

  21. #134
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    Yeah, I had no idea what it was for either. Finally got brave enough to turn it on to see what happens.

    That, and the instant inch/metric switchover, are the 2 biggest selling points of this thing for me. Whatever other details there are that piss me off now and then, I don't think I'd ever get rid of this to make room for something else. If not for the ton of time I've got in it making special fixtures, it's just so nice for the little bit of rifle work I do for fun.

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