I have a S&B 1024 VSL - should i get a Schaublin 102 VM *opinions sought*
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    Default I have a S&B 1024 VSL - should i get a Schaublin 102 VM *opinions sought*

    Hey Guys,

    Thanks in advance for any responses.

    To frame to a conversation I should explain that I am very much a novice, I currently have an S&B 1024 VSL lathe. I did my research before buying a lathe and wanted something with good features, was sturdy and could produce some accurate work - I initially looked for a Hardinge HLV-H or a Schaublin 102 VM but just couldn't find one at a reasonable price relative to the condition.

    The 1024 came up and I did a bit of research to find they are a very respected lathe so I bought it, My workshop is reasonably sized and I have 3 phase power so I thought why not.

    I have not been using it for very long but I am pretty happy with it, I only use it for hobby use so it's ample for whatever I may throw at it.

    But now a Schaublin 102 VM has come up at what seems like a reasonable price and I have to say that I am tempted.

    I am only considering it because the Schaublin is smaller and probably more suited to the kind of work that I do and while sp-ace is not too much of an issue in my workshop the smaller Schaublin would fit better in my workshop.

    I have never used a Schaublin so I am hoping by reputation more than anything but has anyone out there got an opinion?

    does the VSL have features that the Schaublin does not that I may miss or does the Schaublin have features that the VSL does not have that may be useful?

    I appreciate any advice given

    Regards

    Ricky

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    Where are you? This will inform your decision- how often do lathes of interest come up for sale in your area?

    L7

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    Thanks, I am based just outside London in the UK

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    Well...
    Do you want (need) a sports car or a station wagon?
    The S&B 1024 is bigger, (10"x24" vs 8" x17.5") stronger and for where you are in your hobby to this point equally accurate.( mine holds 0.0002" on 10") It takes more "usual" sized tooling and takes 5C collets in the spindle nose.
    The Schaublin is a very fine lathe too, but I don't think you'll gain anything, and will loose the size capability.

    I have an older S&B 1024, along with a Hendey T&G lathe. I am struggling with which one to sell.
    The S&B is a lovely lathe!

    Just my $0.02

    Pete

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    Will you need to sell your S&B to buy the Schaublin? I have a 1024 and I would not make this swap. My example is old, but turns straight, produces beautiful finishes and is accurate. It has done everything that I wanted from a toolroom quality 5-6 inch lathe. I wish it had the taper turning attachment - one day I will get around to making one for it.

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    If you can afford it and have the room, have both.

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    I may have misunderstood the OP. I thought it was an either or. If, as folks have suggested, you can get both, then yes, do get both. Having a second lathe is often very convenient. The fact I currently have four lathes at home might be more than just convenient...

    L7

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    Thanks Pete, the convenience of the 5C collets is useful, especially as I have a 5c indexer that I use on my FP1. The schaublin comes with a full set of its own proprietary collets.

    As for tooling, I have modified my 1024 to use a Swiss Multifix tool post (size A) I would keep this and use it on the Schaublin as I believe it would take the same size?

    As I mostly do very small stuff (parts for tethered model hydroplanes) I was wondering if the additional spindle speed would be beneficial?

    Regards

    Ricky

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    Unfortunately, I do not have space for both. Though I do have the taper turning attachment for my 1024 and I am not sure the Schaublin has one - I do need it!

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    I wish, unfortunately I don't have space for both

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    You were right, I only have space for one lathe

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    QT: I do need it!...the taper turning attachment.
    I think a taper atachment is very handy..but only you know if you need it.

    IMHO a decent S&B 1024 VSL would be hard to beat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trickymex View Post
    As I mostly do very small stuff (parts for tethered model hydroplanes)
    Now that sounds interesting. Fuel or electric powered?

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    Ha - Well I run exclusively methanol powered 2 strokes but we have classes for electric and even steam-powered.

    It's very much a competition of engineering. it's pretty simple and if you have ever seen control line planes or tether cars, it's the water-born equivalent.

    There is a fixed pole in the middle of a large pond/small lake. The pole has an encoder so we can measure the number of revolutions over time and from that, we can calculate the speed (It's all automated)

    There are several classes based on size of engine and configuration of the boat. We refer to them as airscrew and water screw - This denotes with the propeller is a conventional surface piercing marine propeller-driven boat or boat plane hybrid that uses a plane engine and propellor to propel the boat.

    There is absolutely no control once they are launched and the skill is in the design/build of the boat and the setup and launch.

    Tuning is critical as you have to tune the fuel needle while the model is static and take in to account the centrifugal force on the fuel as the model gets up to speed.

    Speeds are pretty extreme, 2.5cc Airscrews are generally the fastest with speeds nearing 200 mph - This is B1 class. The fastest water screw class is the A3's - these are 10cc 2 strokes and are getting near 150 mph.

    Surprisingly steam-powered boats have got as fast as 130 mph, I think the record is 131 mph. Pretty impressive to see.

    Here are some links to some videos

    YouTube

    here is a steam-powered one

    YouTube

    an electric one

    YouTube

    Unfortunately, there are not many very good videos online bit hopefully it gives you the idea.

    The boats are all fully him built from scratch, in some cases so are the engines though most buy the engines. all steam engines are scratch built.

    I will post some pictures of my boats and builds if you're interested?

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    Thank you for this. I'd love to see boat pictures although the forum moderators might think it's too far off topic. Perhaps you could email them to me instead. I think my profile lists my email if not I can post it here.


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