Newly Acquired Cazeneuve HB 575.. Need Tool Post!!
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    Default Newly Acquired Cazeneuve HB 575.. Need Tool Post!!

    Hello Gentlemen.. I just acquired a used but in very good shape, Cazeneuve HB 575 lathe for my small machine/hobby shop.. The only problem thus far is, the tool post is missing.. Just the stud remains in the compound.. I attached some photos below..

    Anyone know of a parts supplier or used market for this? Should I put a generic one in its place? Thanks Much,

    More pictures to follow in the coming weeks when it arrives..









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    I would be inclined to go with an Aloris style toolpost.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crcarson26 View Post
    the tool post is missing.. Just the stud remains in the compound.
    .
    .
    Anyone know of a parts supplier or used market for this?
    Cazeneuve. France. The OEM, still in business:

    http://www.cazeneuve.fr/service-en

    As with the HBX-360, it is a proprietary mount, and "most often" seen with a compact 4-Way on old, old HB / HBX, a Multifix QCTP on not QUITE so old to the present-day Optica models.

    http://www.cazeneuve.fr/machines-en/optica-lathes

    Should I put a generic one in its place? Thanks Much,
    One can mount anything you want. Several folk already have.

    Not hard. Not even all that tedious. Just "different" than the more common Tee-slot is all.

    Given it has the space for a Multifix as was OEM, that would be the best one for it. Even if budget means it has to be a clone, it will have a stiffer base than an Aloris/clone.

    "Might" even fit the existing post? Some other Pilgrim's input needed on that. I'm a cheapskate, so prefer 4-Ways so as to not need a raft of toolholders.

    Spindle mount is also proprietary. That part is harder. Or simply more expensive. Ladner.fr has the backplates as well as the Cazeneuve factory.

    Cazeneuve's customer service / parts department has had good reviews, even very recently. Language is not a problem, nor shipping. Nothing is "cheap", modern-era, but the prices seen so far are reasonable. And the goods are AVAILABLE, which is not true of all Old Iron, Monarch one of the few other well-supported ones.

    More news to the good side is that HBX lathes just MIGHT have the best and most detailed technical documentation available as any lathe ever built, anywhere, any era in history. And then.. several dedicated PM members have expanded on it as well.

    Downside is it is all THERE, or tries to be, or needs the help of about 30 patents which are also very well done and online, but most of it isn't all that easy to UNDERSTAND, and that is a weirdness-in-a-good-way thing, not a language-poorly-translated thing atall! The translations are very good, actually.

    You'd have to know two generations of genius-level engineers, Henri Bruet, elder and younger, then multiply that by the special flavour of one small corner of France as to the outlook on how to address a challenge.

    It has long been a "French thing" to solve a problem without the boredom of doing it the same way anyone ELSE had already done! Or would ever DARE to do, in future!

    Think Ettore Bugatti (transplanted Italian, actually, but that wasn't new..).

    Or André-Gustave Citroën (Polish Jewish emigre, fruit merchant ancestry, literally "Lemon man", his G'Dad's era).

    Or Le Rhône aircraft engines... or so some thinkle peeped they were!



    What did DeGaulle allegedly say?

    "How can anyone be expected to govern a nation with over 400 varieties of cheese?"

    Welcome to THAT club, too!

    Wine, women, cheese, bread, fine-dining, or machine-tools, not much of anything French will ever be DULL!

    Not-even the HBX lathes built by Nardini in Brazil, a Japanese captive partner in Japan, or a shorter-lived one in Spain.



    Bill

    HBX-360-BC, first-generation (cast base, not weldment)

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    Hey Bill.. Yes I am leaning towards the Multifix as well.. I believe the correct size for this machine is the Size C.. You seem to have an abundance of knowledge on this machine.. I may bug you in the near future for guidance and questions as I get this beast installed and thoroughly cleaned.. More pics and info to come!! CHeers,

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    Quote Originally Posted by crcarson26 View Post
    Hey Bill.. Yes I am leaning towards the Multifix as well.. I believe the correct size for this machine is the Size C.. You seem to have an abundance of knowledge on this machine.. I may bug you in the near future for guidance and questions as I get this beast installed and thoroughly cleaned.. More pics and info to come!! CHeers,
    "Abundance" thank to Milacron, both personally, as a machinery dealer, and in his role of PM founder, actually.

    He had my lathe for "a while". As we know, he gets curious and digs into "interesting" or unusual machines as cross his dock. His interest, in turn, may have been raised by earlier-posters also "right here on PM", such as Ole Steen, pastypies, and a few others.

    That has continued to the present-day, Cazeneuve contributors among some of the most considerate as to attention to detail and highest-grade of their contributions as ever were, here or anywhere else. Remarkable folks, all, in making it easier for each of the next.

    Milacron made comparisons, Cazeneuve's optional TS with comparable Schaublin tailstocks, etc. Eventually, he got MY curiosity ramped-up to where I bought the very machine he had been playing with for myself. Flew South, picked up my "usual" easy-driving 26-foot Penske box truck, found his hide-out, booked a nearby room.

    Next day, he loaded it himself - dab hand with a FL, Milacron is, could probably thread a needle.

    I then hauled it home to Virgininyah,. Still learning, such "spare time" as I have, but it's a damned good lathe with not a lot of wear nor need of much spend. So far.

    Your one looks clean and low-wear as well.

    So.. dig ye for treasure - "right here, on PM".

    Create a folder, drop into it links to all threads Cazeneuve HB, the smaller 360 included, and you'll soon know a great deal about OTHER sources, too - same place I got my info from!



    Not only is Cazeneuve still in biz, the "chassis" of the Siemens-equipped CNC/aided-manual or "teach-in: hybrid lathes appears to be much the same as it ever was.

    Nor are these actually "minority" or "niche" lathes.

    Machine-tools, durable goods if ever were, and with "obsolete" not the same as "useless", can last longer than their owners' life-spans, ergo don't sell like Big Macs nor even automobiles do.

    But with over 40,000 HB series lathes delivered, and not having ceased, yet? It's a wonder we don't see more Cazeneuve's, even in the USA.


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