Schaublin 160 in New York looking for a new owner - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Curiously there is also a later style 160 on auction right now in Germany:
    ▷ SCHAUBLIN 160 Centre Lathe: buy used

    Going high already, not even counting the rediculous fees.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin P View Post
    Curiously there is also a later style 160 on auction right now in Germany:
    ▷ SCHAUBLIN 160 Centre Lathe: buy used

    Going high already, not even counting the rediculous fees.

    Martin, any suggestions for crate builders and shippers in Germany and Netherlands?

    Occassionally I come across a machine I like but the shipping is the killer. There was a Weiler Primus benchtop version a few years back, in the Netherlands or Germany, but I didn't bite due to cost of crating and shipping which I assumed would run in the thousands of Euros.

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    What did the Surplex Schaublin 160 go for?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #24
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    was just over 16k on the day of the auction, I forgot to check the final minutes, and Surplex has that annoying feature that they instantly remove finished auctions from listing...

  5. #25
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    Fwiw. The machine is nice but by no means "pristine".Some bed wear and it still has drive and wiring issues.But that is to be expected for a machine of this vintage.All machines of this age need some TLC.

    Having seen the "best" of European lathes and American lathes, my opinion is that the european lathes generally have softer beds than American lathes of the same vintage. Steel ways or not.

    I've seen Monarchs with 10x more use with less bed wear when compared with a VDF, Weiler, Cazeneuve and Schaublin etc..

    "Best" is an internet phantasy. All machines have their pros and cons.

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  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Martin, any suggestions for crate builders and shippers in Germany and Netherlands?

    Occassionally I come across a machine I like but the shipping is the killer. There was a Weiler Primus benchtop version a few years back, in the Netherlands or Germany, but I didn't bite due to cost of crating and shipping which I assumed would run in the thousands of Euros.

    If you buy a machine from me I can arrange shipping and crating
    I recently sold a Mikron WF2SA to SC Shipping DAP and crating was about €1400,-
    Much depends on the cost of inland transport and port handling which is quit expencive in the USA
    Import tax is differt in every state AFAIK
    The buyer/importer or his broker always has to do the ISF when the item arrives by boat
    BTW I have a Weiler Primus benchtop with milling head right now


    Peter

  8. #27
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    I cant say its with all machines, the steel ways on my Lodge & Shipley Powerturn did not hold up as well as I expected after using the machine for over 20yrs in hydraulics.

  9. #28
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    I'm no authority.And true it is a generalization. I never ran or owned a Lodge & Shipley. The ones I have seen in the wild did not impress me on the bed ways. I especially did not like the way they did the tail stock V on the Power turn. As I recall, strange angle and thin.

    I have a Sidney with very robust tool steel ways.While I do not have an actual hardness #.From the wear to use ratio of the machine and the color/shine of the steel, they seem very hard.

    Another generalization and observation is that American made lathes from the golden era overall had larger ways, especially the Vs than lathes of other origins.

    Check out the front angle ways on some of the larger Leblonds.

    If you want to see how machinery fairs after decades to a near century of abuse I highly recommend visiting HGR in Cleveland occasionally.

    Again this is just my opinion from my own limited experience.

  10. #29
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    Here is a comment from Schaublin Owners Group on the lathe in question:

    Hello Group, I looked at a Schaublin 160 in New York 6 months ago and it was shoved in a corner and not hooked up. The seller reached out to me last week to say it was up and running. I was able to contact a gentleman who ran the machine 20 years ago and his nickname for it was "excedrin" ( headache medicine) and said that it was very noisy and it did not run at correct rpm, middle range did not work. I see the machine is now listed on ebay for $29,500 usd, which I think is more than double what the machine is worth ? I would greatly appreciate feedback on noise issue after you view the attached link for video. Also on the asking price.

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by yzfr1pwr View Post
    Fwiw. The machine is nice but by no means "pristine".Some bed wear and it still has drive and wiring issues.But that is to be expected for a machine of this vintage.All machines of this age need some TLC.

    Having seen the "best" of European lathes and American lathes, my opinion is that the european lathes generally have softer beds than American lathes of the same vintage. Steel ways or not.

    I've seen Monarchs with 10x more use with less bed wear when compared with a VDF, Weiler, Cazeneuve and Schaublin etc..

    "Best" is an internet phantasy. All machines have their pros and cons.
    Fair points. Very. (1 X 10EE, '42 and '44, one HBX-360-BC around 1970's)

    I'd say it is not "just" hardness. More wear hits the underside of the carriage than the upper side of the ways in any case. And the ways are "usually" longer as well, so distribute wear more.

    Approx 14" X 30" Caze has a larger bed, but smaller prismatic vees ON it, "relatively", than the Approx 10" x 20" 10EE's.

    Also a narrower carriage, long-axis, "relatively":

    20 1/2" for nominal 10" swing, 3 & 5 HP 10EE

    22 1/2" for nominal 14" swing, 7 HP Cazeneuve.

    And an HBX-360 is NOT "stingey". Other Euro goods are not as well served.

    Same yardstick, ancient soft-bed Niles and far better L&S even pre "tool steel" era also had rather large rations of surface area bearing in sliding contact.

    Longevity tracks that. Most especially when lube has NOT been properly seen to.

    Did the average European operator take better care of cleaning, lube & c. than his US counterpart? I'd bet that they did. Preserve whatever you are blessed with society.

    Euro lathe under US hands may not have been as well-served? I'd bet that, too!
    Use it up and replace it with better "cowboy economy".

    Attitudes every bit as much as metallurgy.

  12. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by jz79 View Post
    good luck to them selling it, they are going to need it

    then again, Milacrons P50 Fehlmann went for 21k at his auction, so anything is possible in US
    It actually went for $25,665..... the buyer premium is real money... not an illusion after all... ....At least the buyer got free ship prep and loading....atypical for an auction...

  13. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Fair points. Very. (1 X 10EE, '42 and '44, one HBX-360-BC around 1970's)

    I'd say it is not "just" hardness. More wear hits the underside of the carriage than the upper side of the ways in any case. And the ways are "usually" longer as well, so distribute wear more.

    Approx 14" X 30" Caze has a larger bed, but smaller prismatic vees ON it, "relatively", than the Approx 10" x 20" 10EE's.

    Also a narrower carriage, long-axis, "relatively":

    20 1/2" for nominal 10" swing, 3 & 5 HP 10EE

    22 1/2" for nominal 14" swing, 7 HP Cazeneuve.

    And an HBX-360 is NOT "stingey". Other Euro goods are not as well served.

    Same yardstick, ancient soft-bed Niles and far better L&S even pre "tool steel" era also had rather large rations of surface area bearing in sliding contact.

    Longevity tracks that. Most especially when lube has NOT been properly seen to.

    Did the average European operator take better care of cleaning, lube & c. than his US counterpart? I'd bet that they did. Preserve whatever you are blessed with society.

    Euro lathe under US hands may not have been as well-served? I'd bet that, too!
    Use it up and replace it with better "cowboy economy".

    Attitudes every bit as much as metallurgy.
    Of all the manual lathes I've ran the HBX/HBY to me are best for threading.


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