Webb/Whacheon WL-435 Lathe - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Jun 2006
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    The 10” 3 jaw that came with my lathe is an A1-6, but it looks like the face has been the unintended target of [boring through with] a boring bar more than once...



    Quote Originally Posted by Nmbmxer View Post
    Its a WL-435, the same as yours. I don’t have a collet setup. I have a front mounted 5c closer I could fit but I probably won’t. I was going to make a 5.5mt to 5c adapter out of some 1144 I have when the need arose. My adjust tru repeats very well so a collet wouldn’t offer many advantages, I’m not sure that a 5c would be that useful on a 17” lathe.

    I have a 12” 3 jaw that someone messed up the A1 mount on that needs fixing, a 10” 4 jaw that needs stiff jaws fixed, and a 6” adjust tru mounted to a A2-6 back plate. I use the little chuck the most as the 10” chuck won’t grab stock under 1”.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #42
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    Dec 2015
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    How does that happen? Fall asleep and wake up when the tool post hits the chuck?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripperj View Post
    How does that happen? Fall asleep and wake up when the tool post hits the chuck?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Good question.
    I don’t see any excuse for not paying attention.
    A careless and expensive mistake.
    The chuck came this way and the damage is largely cosmetic and the chuck seems to be fine, but I’ll kick myself if I do something like that.

  4. #44
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    Jun 2008
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    Tom at Greer Machinery told me over email that the WL-435 headstock sits on a flat surface and has jacking bolts on the back to rotate the headstock. Now I just have to find all the bolts holding the headstock down, the two under the chuck are obvious but I don't see the others without taking stuff off.

    He also said a parts book was $85.

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  6. #45
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    Jun 2008
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    Thank you to those who offered to send me pdf manuals. Fortunately I already have paper parts and operations manuals, the parts book is just of low quality and it’s hard to read.

    I found all the bolts, 3 under the chuck and 2 inside the end cover. The end cover has to be removed and the sector for the 120/127 gear. You need a 14mm hex bit for the bolts. I had to make one from some O1.

    I re-leveled the lathe to within a division on my .0005/10” level end to end. Still has about .003 of twist if I don’t have it anchored to my bed bender thing (don’t want to anchor it to the floor.)

    Next I put some 2” 1144 that was about a foot long and machined two collars, first using the same dial settings and the tailstock end was .008 larger than the headstock end. Then I polished the headstock collar and then cut / polished the tailstock collar to be within .0002 of the other.

    Setting up a dial indicator I verified that there was about .004” radial difference between the collars. Next I loosened the two M10 SHCS’s on the back and using those with the two adjacent set screws got the dial indicator to read the same on both collars. Then I switched to a 10th indicator and repeated the process. I did check both the front and the back and averaged the readings to account for any diameter error. I ended up with both ends within .0002 of each other. I also found .0002 of rock when I reversed the carriage handwheel, good enough for what I use it for, it’s not an HLVH.

    Tomorrow I’ll make the necessary adjustments to the tailstock now that the headstock isn’t sitting where it was before and reassemble the left end of the lathe and it should be good for a while.

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