what looks a marvellous japanese manual toolroom lathe
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  1. #1
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    Default what looks a marvellous japanese manual toolroom lathe


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    Quote Originally Posted by alb.gunsmith View Post
    Sure looks like a nice machine. Wonder if it is being imported to the U.S.
    I can't read Japanese so the website isn't too useful for me.

    Ted

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    Looks pretty nice. Google seems to translate most of the site OK.

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    Is that an LCD display I see on the electrical panel (along with a bunch of cheap crappy buttons ?) If so, it has a microprocessor.

    If so, it's shit.

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    Certainly not a handsome machine but no doubt very capable.
    Interesting that half of the first video is the production crew credits.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    If so, it's shit.
    If there's one thing I always say about EG, its "man does that guy every modulate his outbursts"

    I do confess when I saw the Hello (World) screen it was a bit the fly inthe ointment, does it add value or just something else to go wrong.

    Overall though, if built to Japanese machine standards it looks like a beautiful machine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Is that an LCD display I see on the electrical panel (along with a bunch of cheap crappy buttons ?) If so, it has a microprocessor.

    If so, it's shit.
    Scared of computers?

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    Is it electronic lead screw? Or just a menu selected threading gear mechanism?

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    I'm just going to pipe up that when I saw this thread about 2 hours ago, I watched the videos and decided to send an inquiry if they will be made available stateside and at what price. It makes me think of a modernized Takisawa TSL-800, which I have and thoroughly enjoy, but this thing is neat because they're specifically targeting the manual lathe market.If I get a reply from them I will add it to this thread.

    Mark

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    The japanese make a lot of cool machines like this- and they make zero effort to export them.
    Japanese companies will pay very high prices for made in Japan quality machine tools.
    Practically nobody else will.
    If you go to shops in Japan, you see japanese made machine tools, woodworking tools, and machines for many other specialty industries- printing, jewelry, welding- that are not exported.
    They tried, and nobody was actually willing to pay what it costs.
    Sometimes you can find used ones on japanese used machinery websites, but you are completely on your own for parts and service.

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    Wow that is a cool looking machine... I think its so funny hearing old timers talk about shitty Jap stuff. Too bad you won't see one here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    Is it electronic lead screw? Or just a menu selected threading gear mechanism?
    Google translate says X and Y feeds have separate servo motors with menu selected feeds (and threads for X feed). The servos explain why the carriage/apron look so bulky. Website didn't make clear if it has threading auto-stop/auto-retract/auto-reverse, but the electric feeds means it certainly could. It also means it might not need a taper attachment, although if you can only choose from a fixed menu of feeds, you'll probably not get a combo that matches a desired taper-per-inch.

    "Reciprocating stand travel distance of 640 mm" is a tantalizing mis-translation, but might mean auto-threading up to 25 inches. Or it might just mean carriage travel of 25", as the lathe is 31.5" between centers.

    That machine has a few things I'd have to think twice about, like an A1-5 nose and a 1.6" spindle bore, but it's got at least one feature I wanted but could not find on a new 16X30 or 16X40 machine ten years ago, and that's the T-slotted rear of the cross-slide, for mounting rear cutoff, skive and forming tools.

    Definitely interested in seeing if they bring this to the North American market, and at what price.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nihilistic View Post
    Scared of computers?
    Electronics always fail. And when they do, you can't replace them.

    Remember the peecee controls craze ? "If it breaks, just run down to your local computer store and buy a new one for $39.95 !"

    Go buy a mainboard with a VESA bus nowadays. I dare you.

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    finding a clerk at a PC hardware store that has heard of VESA wouldn't be easy these days, and you dare someone to find the actual hardware...

    servos aren't that difficult to find today, there are quite a few inexpensive (relatively) options that would fit such a lathe with maybe a little work, even open source ones if you're into that sort of thing, finding a direct replacement some 10 or 20 years after you bought it might be difficult, but getting it back up and running wouldn't be as impossible as you suggest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    They tried, and nobody was actually willing to pay what it costs.
    If we cut off their oil supply again they will try harder.

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    They don't even have a translated information page so not interested in USA sales. Likely not better than other high end machines. Still they (Japs) really think out a thing they design so likely very good for fresh off the shelf item.
    I don't like to buy anything first off the shelf because the bugs have not been corrected and one may not know if they will be making parts fives years down the pike,.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cranium View Post
    Certainly not a handsome machine but no doubt very capable.
    Interesting that half of the first video is the production crew credits.
    i am not a real machinist, i just use to tinker now and then in military shops.... but i have earned a very sane respect for japanese made manual machines.
    it happens to be lot of times in asian factories, third world...there are such marvellous japanese toolmaking lathes (small ones) and milling machines.
    i love smaller machines, and i see them more as the backbone of man's civilization, i would never be able to squeeze all performance.
    but this machine i would say that would be eprfect ...it is of coruse just an oppinion of the guy who has very but very basic skills ...and most of it learned in this great forum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Electronics always fail. And when they do, you can't replace them.

    Remember the peecee controls craze ? "If it breaks, just run down to your local computer store and buy a new one for $39.95 !"

    Go buy a mainboard with a VESA bus nowadays. I dare you.
    Yeah, but nowadays you head to the local makerspace and round up a kid who is playing with Rasberry Pi and such, and have him strip the programming off the original system and run the whole lot off a Pi and a cell phone out of the recycle bin. All for a buck-niety-eleven in parts and a half case of energy drinks.

    Seems to me, if they went to the trouble of building in servos and all the computer crap, then the obvious addition to that would be to plant a monitor over the headstock to use as a general purpose display and DRO, no?

    If the machine already knows where it 'is' at all times, as it should for some of the functions shown, that seems the logical step to me.

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    Any day now we are going to go aways from these fancy electronics and computers.

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  24. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizingkid View Post
    Any day now we are going to go aways from these fancy electronics and computers.
    Yeah. Or the stuff will become commonplace enough that folks will no longer flinch when they see it.


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