100' Tape Marked in Inches instead of feet? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I have dealt with this a lot in the past year.

    I designed my entire steel and concrete shop in Mastercam in inches. My 100' tape is in feet and inches one side and decimal feet the other.

    It's real fucking easy to use the wrong side of the tape and be off 3/4" or so on a big measurement. I totally spaced the two sided tap deal when I set the forms for my main crane column footings years before I built the columns. I had to build each column to fit each specific footing. Not so easy when you have to keep track of which direction and how much each 24" flange is offset as you lay it out on the ground.

    I just converted each inch measurement into feet and inches with my phone. It was a PITA and I did it about 300 times more than the OP's 8 points.

    I understand why we have decimal feet, but I think there should be 100' tapes and story poles available in just straight up inches for us dumbshit machinists.

    I also wish fiberglass tapes wren't so stretchy and steel tapes wouldn't snap the second they get a nick in the side.
    Last edited by Garwood; 03-18-2019 at 02:25 PM.

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    If there is a market for a Wi-Fi connected barbecue grill and a battery operated adjustable wrench,
    than surely there's a customer out there needing a tape measure marked off completely in inches or millimeters.

    The folks at Stanley, Lufkin, etc. are always seeking out new product ideas.

    The concept ties in with other products people buy because they find them useful.

    Perhaps a more measured place for the discussion would have been in Metrology? Ha Ha
    From there, it could be handed off to CAD / CAM for design.

    Maybe after that, it could return here for a discussion on marketing and distribution of the item.
    "But" it would also have to be discussed in Manufacturing.

    Product packaging could feature the Practical Machinist logo highlighting the on-line forum...

    And!
    Long time Practical Machinist forum personality Gordon could be the product spokesman.

    The ideas are endless here ; )

    To a great start to your work week!

    John

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    You could offer a year of free healthcare with every tape measure.

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    Not sure how they handle 4 digit numbers, but McMaster appears to have 100' tapes in inches: McMaster-Carr

    I have a couple set of adhesive backed tapes. One is a 10' continuous reading from 0 to 120", the other is 0-100 with a lead on front and back, so one can just splice in additional
    tapes to get to the required length as needed.
    I've used them on a long table for trimming AL extrusions to anywhere from 4' to 22' lengths.

    They are steel and very durable, but for the life of me can't remember where I've got them from.

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    Quote Originally Posted by d'Arsonval View Post
    If there is a market for a Wi-Fi connected barbecue grill and a battery operated adjustable wrench,
    than surely there's a customer out there needing a tape measure marked off completely in inches or millimeters.

    The folks at Stanley, Lufkin, etc. are always seeking out new product ideas.

    The concept ties in with other products people buy because they find them useful.

    Perhaps a more measured place for the discussion would have been in Metrology? Ha Ha
    From there, it could be handed off to CAD / CAM for design.

    Maybe after that, it could return here for a discussion on marketing and distribution of the item.
    "But" it would also have to be discussed in Manufacturing.

    Product packaging could feature the Practical Machinist logo highlighting the on-line forum...

    And!
    Long time Practical Machinist forum personality Gordon could be the product spokesman.

    The ideas are endless here ; )

    To a great start to your work week!

    John
    Maybe Tiffany & Co will make one to spec.

    $1275 for this one


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    Quote Originally Posted by BRHMFG View Post
    Situation: Round structure 48' 5" in circumference. Mark out 8 legs evenly spaced. =72.625" or 6' 5/8". that one is pretty easy but say it comes out to 6' 3.6654". I don't do calculation well in my head:
    I suggest you convert to metric. Do it in millimeters. You avoid fractions and decimals. so circumference is 48x12 = 576 add 5 for 581 convert to mm 581 x 25.4 = 14757 /8 = 1844.6 put that number in memory and keep adding it as you walk around with your tape.
    No fractions one calculation string. I did several large pressure vessels in metric and after that I realized that it was much easier than fiddling with fractions and marking locations with a soapstone.
    Try it once then decide just what I am .... but don't say it out loud. LOL

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    I like the metric tape idea. Trouble is, will I remember it when I can use it?

    I've laid out tables of values for indexing prime numbers for indexer plates (rotary table), in degrees and minutes. I wouldn't think of 'doing it on the fly'! A mistake is too damn costly. But it is certainly not what I'd call difficult to calculate, just tedious.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HuFlungDung View Post
    I like the metric tape idea. Trouble is, will I remember it when I can use it?
    Don't think of it as metric. Think of it as money (dollars and cents) being divided evenly between people.

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    If I am remembering correctly railroad engines are measured in inches exclusively to avoid feet inch conversions and mistakes. If so the OP's tape may already exist for rail road use.

    To Gordon, my Machinery's Handbook says that the US legalized the use of and defined the meter in 1866. That was back before the meter was really standardized. The UK, France and the US each got the first standards. They were not as accurate as they should have been. Knowing the French/English rivalry I am sure England got the short one.

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    We used a survey tape for surveying Kellyroad camp. it was 100 feet with i Think feet inches and 10ths. They are also made in 100' lengths.. You had to stretch the tape with a certain pull in pounds to qualify the measure was correct..We first tried a Gunter's Chain but that was a chore to use.

    Lufkin 100' x 1/4" Peerless Chrome Clad Engineer's Tape (10ths/100ths) - Tapes - Measuring Supplies - Supplies - Allen Precision Equipment

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    Quote Originally Posted by FredC View Post
    To Gordon, my Machinery's Handbook says that the US legalized the use of and defined the meter in 1866. That was back before the meter was really standardized. The UK, France and the US each got the first standards. They were not as accurate as they should have been. Knowing the French/English rivalry I am sure England got the short one.
    I've no problem with handbooks and that includes telephone books.

    Re "short one" then look at how much a US ton is compared to a UK one and for that matter the difference in a gallon between the two.

    An inch is now referenced to 1 meter so, for better or worse, the inch is now "metric".

    "Standards for the exact length of an inch have varied in the past, but since the adoption of the international yard during the 1950s and 1960s it has been based on the metric system and defined as exactly 25.4 mm."

    Metre - Wikipedia

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    Using a Sharpie Extra Fine Point Industrial "Super Permanent Ink" black marking pen,
    it will take approximately 2 hours and 20 minutes to legibly hand letter a 100 foot long
    conventional steel tape. This factors in a 5 minute break for every 25 feet lettered.

    After 999 inches, there is a slight increase in required time to letter a four digit numeral.
    Considering it is a negligible plus-or-minus amount of time, one can say it takes 2-1/2 hours
    to modify an existing steel tape to indicate 1200 inches.

    Before you begin the project, have additional pens within reach and any other logistics
    you think you may need at the ready.

    With the above information, a fairly accurate cost estimate can be established to make your own
    tape depending on how much you want to pay yourself, and the original cost of the tape itself.

    For those of you laughing at this post, (because it is funny) consider the 2-1/2 hours you've spent
    reading this forum board, and have nothing in return to show for your time spent here.

    Spring has arrived. Get to work!

    John

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    Instead of marking out the circumference, how about marking out the straight length between two posts? Then keep moving around. If you end up 2" off when you measure from post 8 to post 1, add or remove 1/4" from the individual length and re-mark the posts. You only need a short. tape measure at that point.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Fleming View Post
    Instead of marking out the circumference, how about marking out the straight length between two posts? Then keep moving around. If you end up 2" off when you measure from post 8 to post 1, add or remove 1/4" from the individual length and re-mark the posts. You only need a short tape measure at that point.
    Interesting idea. Have you ever tried it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    Interesting idea. Have you ever tried it?
    Yes but not on anything that large. I've marked non-critical features on indexed parts, when I didn't have an indexer.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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    This could be simple (and accurate) if it was calculated as a chord length.

    calculating chord length of an arc - Google Search

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    Interesting ideas above!!
    I would have no problem with using metric but I'm not gonna use both. I hate tapes with dual systems and exactly where would the metric tape be when I needed it? Same with feet and tenths. Prefer to use one system.
    Measuring cord length is not really helpful. Its easy to divide my circumference into segments, clamp a short tape on and measure from mark to mark. But, the 100' tape is more accurate.
    Here is what I've found to use the tapes I already have.
    First I found a better foot/inch calculator app that displays numbers just like you would read the tape. It also has a cool feature that if you put in 9 5/8" + you can show a series that will add 9 5/8" indefinitely. Really handy if you have an odd spacing on a really long part.
    Better yet, I found an Excel formula that takes any number with decimal and displays it as Feet' Inch" with fractions to the nearest 1/16th. Formula is about a whole page wide.....
    Right now I use an excel sheet anyway to run a few calculations and print off with the work order on this particular product so to add a line that shows a few measurements now in feet and inches is a snap!
    Not that it couldn't be figured on the fly but I'm trying to eliminate guesswork and if all I have to do is glance at my order sheet and mark it out, it shaves a bit of time off. Also trying to make the process easy enough for employees when that time comes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRHMFG View Post
    Better yet, I found an Excel formula that takes any number with decimal and displays it as Feet' Inch" with fractions to the nearest 1/16th. Formula is about a whole page wide.....
    Excel has built-in fractional format. This is from Excel 2013, but I'm sure earlier versions also have the same option.

    excel-fractional.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRHMFG View Post
    I would have no problem with using metric but I'm not gonna use both.
    You obviously do have a problem. Forget the fact that a metric tape is metric and just regard the numbers as numbers. You just divide the number shown of the circumference by the number of divisions you want.

    That is what you originally wanted to do.

    Is $30 max for a good one too much for you?

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    Default String?

    Quote Originally Posted by BRHMFG View Post
    Every 100' tape I've seen is marked out in feet and inches. Is there such a thing as a tape that gives inches like a standard 25' tape? (13,14,..121,122,etc)(instead of 1' 1", 10' 1", etc)
    Preferably metal blade. Would make much easier when marking out evenly spaced items along a long length to simply add inches instead of feet/inch.
    I did find a feet/inch calculator app with a repeat calculation that may solve the issue since I haven't found a tape as described. Hate to pull out my phone for this tho.
    Situation: Round structure 48' 5" in circumference. Mark out 8 legs evenly spaced. =72.625" or 6' 5/8". that one is pretty easy but say it comes out to 6' 3.6654". I don't do calculation well in my head:
    How about non stretching string https://www.amazon.com/JCS-Strength-.../dp/B00GDC2CZA
    Wrap it around once, mark it, fold it into 8 equal segments, mark it then wrap it around again and transfer your marks.
    You can reuse the string too!

    Harry


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