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  1. #41
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    Showing a pic of a product that shows werkmanship is not the same as divulging proprietary design info.
    Good grief - are these guys supplying you manufacturing drawings with it to check agginst?

    And - as far as NDA stuff, certainly no-one ever came from another shop and had an ass_u_med way of dooing sumpthing, stating that "Over at so and so's we did that this way".

    Not everything is a secret.

    Now, showing a customer list and maybe prices for those parts, now THAT's what I would be concerned with.
    Not showing werkmanship.


    AND - quite honestly, a pic of this person beside the product shows that the pic wasn't pirated off the web somewhere.
    Maybe he did or didn't have anything to doo with the product, but at least he was present with the part at the same time and space.


    I generally feel that my ethics is much higher than most around me, but you guys have the NDA and cheese meter overload thresholds set awfully low.


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    Ox

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  3. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    Showing a pic of a product that shows werkmanship is not the same as divulging proprietary design info.
    Good grief - are these guys supplying you manufacturing drawings with it to check agginst?

    And - as far as NDA stuff, certainly no-one ever came from another shop and had an ass_u_med way of dooing sumpthing, stating that "Over at so and so's we did that this way".

    Not everything is a secret.

    Now, showing a customer list and maybe prices for those parts, now THAT's what I would be concerned with.
    Not showing werkmanship.


    AND - quite honestly, a pic of this person beside the product shows that the pic wasn't pirated off the web somewhere.
    Maybe he did or didn't have anything to doo with the product, but at least he was present with the part at the same time and space.


    I generally feel that my ethics is much higher than most around me, but you guys have the NDA and cheese meter overload thresholds set awfully low.


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    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    I think the picture issue and NDA stuff might revolve around who and what you are working on. Most of my customers have no picture policies, many are ITAR. Some of my customers have proprietary processes and technology that they expect me to keep confidential so I might be more sensitive than many but I do think that it is very important for people looking for new positions to be aware of what potential new employers' needs might be in relationship to confidentiality.

    For example know of an instance in which a building trades person was working in an automotive plant finishing the line modifications for next years model of car. The trades person was impressed with what he was working by and foolishly took a selfie beside the car and posted it. He was in serious trouble in under 6hrs.

    An innocent act that he wanted to share with his buddies and yet it almost got him permanently banned from the plant.

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  5. #43
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    Maybe use a tiny bit of good judgement and know what you can and can't take pictures of? There is nobody on this site that has only made top secret parts. If you have what a bummer you never made a single thing for yourself or for the love of the craft.

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    I can't wait for the "new generation" to fill their resume with emoticons....

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  9. #45
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    Few points.

    First, I'm near positive it's not just permissible but expected to ask about a gap in a resume. You'll want to have a good answer for any gap. What you can't ask (and some interviewers will find ways to ask regardless) is personal stuff like ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, political affiliations, marital status, etc.

    Second, if your work is good and you can answer questions about it - by all means bring some sort of portfolio. I've seen people bring in pretty laughable stuff (over estimating their ability and/or underestimating the demands), but I don't imagine that will be a problem in your case. As others have said, you shouldn't be showing anything proprietary. And you shouldn't be 'dissing your previous employer. You're not fleeing a train wreck - you're looking to become part of a really good team.

    Third, best to do some homework on the company before you show up. Be prepared to put your skills in the context of their work. Helps if a friend of a friend can get you an employee to talk to ahead of time. Any insight you can get into your interviewer(s) can be useful, even in friendly banter with the receptionist when you arrive.

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  11. #46
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    My father in law got his current job in part due to his bringing a portfolio of projects he built. He is a cabinetmaker and does/did it at home as well. It was well received and made him stand out in a good way. If I recall it was not included in his resume but something he brought to the interview.

    I think it certainly depends on where and who you are interviewing with, a mom and pop business will surely be different than Mega Corp.

  12. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by macgyver View Post
    ...it was not included in his resume but something he brought to the interview...
    That is a different story.

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    Quote Originally Posted by yoke View Post
    I would almost prefer pictures of their work.

    It's easier to lie with words than a picture. I would want to know the role the applicant played in its production.

    I have had some pretty darn good fixture designs that can't be appreciated without pictures. I'f I'm hiring someone for the that kind of work I'm going to want to see their work.
    I have a system that I set up for our horizontals that detailed the tooling, positions of the tools, the number of jobs using that tooling, part number and set up sheets that a co-worker decided to email the owner of our company and pass off my work as his.

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    Quote Originally Posted by toolsteel View Post
    We have a "No Cameras / Pictures" policy. Not sure what I would think of an applicant bringing me pictures of someone elses products, equipment or shop.....but I dont think I would like it.
    This is the perfect reason to not have them on a resume, but in a portfolio you bring along with you if you get an interview. I don't think I would personally do pics, but a little common sense goes a long way. If you are interviewing at an ITAR or DOD type facility, probably don't want to "advertise" you have pics of everything you have machined.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    Also leave out any hobbies or activities unrelated to work or job skills. If you donate time at a museum restoring antique machinery that can be included, but no one needs to know your golf handicap.
    I agree with this, but I have seen way too many applications (after they have seen my resume) wanting hobbies and things (even got one asking for a few of my favorite magazines).

    Maybe it's a *subtle* way of asking "do you have any weird hobbies that make you a nogo, or do you have 'cool' hobbies like volunteering at the high school robotics lab..."

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    I feel strongly that a resume should be a single page document detailing only the most relevant education and/or experience for the job to be applied for. That said, regarding "hobbies" I have always included at the bottom of my resume the following two lines:

    Boy Scouts of America Eagle Scout
    Michigan Marching Band Tuba Section

    Anyone who knows what Eagle Scout means will know what that entails, and anyone else probably won't care. MMB shows that I was part of a prestigious program even through college, and it's a great conversation starter. People are always impressed that I can play the tuba, but it's an instrument just like any other. In fact, it's one of the EASIEST instruments to play if you can fill your lungs with enough air, all else being much less demanding than almost any other instrument. So, are they hobbies, or relevant life experiences that showcase capability? IME, all interviewing employers indicated that they thought the latter.

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  19. #52
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    I love the whole nobody fucking cares about your hobbies or you as a person deal... that is the pure essence of corporate America, you are a number, you aren't a person, nobody cares, you will be replaced at the earliest possible moment, just grind away. Oh but the CORPORATION itself, thats a person, it has feelings, it should be given forgiveness when it accidentally kills a few thousand people, its a person, they make mistakes.

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    I don't care in the slightest if someone has pictures of their work on their resume, as long as its done tactfully (sharing stuff shared under an NDA wouldn't be a good look). I always consider the work someone has completed and share as a signature of their craftsmanship and that is paramount to me when hiring.

    I also find the rigid structures taught regarding resumes and job applications mind-numbing but as @kustomizingkid mentioned, they fit corporate america quite well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BoxcarPete View Post
    I feel strongly that a resume should be a single page document detailing only the most relevant education and/or experience for the job to be applied for. That said, regarding "hobbies" I have always included at the bottom of my resume the following two lines:

    Boy Scouts of America Eagle Scout
    Michigan Marching Band Tuba Section

    Anyone who knows what Eagle Scout means will know what that entails, and anyone else probably won't care. MMB shows that I was part of a prestigious program even through college, and it's a great conversation starter. People are always impressed that I can play the tuba, but it's an instrument just like any other. In fact, it's one of the EASIEST instruments to play if you can fill your lungs with enough air, all else being much less demanding than almost any other instrument. So, are they hobbies, or relevant life experiences that showcase capability? IME, all interviewing employers indicated that they thought the latter.
    We rate hobbies like sewing, drawing, calligraphy and instrumental music as highly relevant skills. Roofing as a "sideline" not so much.

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    Musical instrument proficiency's you might want to leave off a resume:
    1. Tuba
    2. Banjo
    3. Accordion
    4. Bagpipes
    Last edited by digger doug; 08-21-2019 at 07:42 AM.

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  24. #56
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    For the record, the pictures of parts I've taken have been cleared with either the customers or are done in such a way that its impossible to tell anything valuable/critical about them.
    I have worked on parts for a govt lab, and even got a pic or 2, but they were cleared because all I was after was the welds and showed no scale or usefulness to what the part was supposed to do...
    One bunch of parts I do I can take pictures all day long until we add 1 specific piece, because our shop designed everything except that one part.
    I'm not on my phone 24/7 and im not taking pictures of everything ever, but some welds/parts stand out and if I can I snag a picture.
    I have missed a lot of pictures I wanted to take because I coudln't/didn't want to stop what I was doing just to grab a pic. Most of the pictures I've gotten were on break/lunch when I could actually use my stupidphone.

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  26. #57
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    One of the definitive "bibles" on job seeking, resumes, etc... that has been in publication annually since 1975... and has sold more than ten million copies to date
    is the book titled, "What Color is Your Parachute".

    In that book, the author uses a resume featuring a photograph of a man standing next to a piece of antique machinery.
    It was one of his favorite resumes to use as an example in the book.

    I don't have a current copy in front of me, but I seem to recall that a choice to include a photo is an individual decision based on ones presentation style
    and is further determined by type of employment one is seeking.

    While it may be partially true that employers are always looking for good people. It's also relatively true that all potential candidates for most any line of employment
    are at the mercy of the demeanor of the person initially reviewing the resume. You have no control over who that person is.

    At best, you are your own sales person. You are selling your skill sets, knowledge-base and experience. If a photo helps convey and sell that information... it's an added plus.

    For most preparing a resume however, it typically squares with what is a "safe", prim and proper resume protocol.
    Usually a single piece of paper with your name, address, phone number and employment history.

    After you win an interview with a potential employer... that's a better time to present photos
    or a portfolio highlighting your accomplishments.

    Let us know if you get a job using a resume featuring a photo.

    And Good Luck in finding what fits you best!

    John

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  28. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizingkid View Post
    I love the whole nobody fucking cares about your hobbies or you as a person deal... that is the pure essence of corporate America, you are a number, you aren't a person, nobody cares, you will be replaced at the earliest possible moment, just grind away. Oh but the CORPORATION itself, thats a person, it has feelings, it should be given forgiveness when it accidentally kills a few thousand people, its a person, they make mistakes.
    You must be a real joy to have as an employee.

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    I would avoid use of pictures for a couple of reasons. First the notion of photographing proprietary processes without express permission of the organization would send up red flags for me. Second photographs can have the opposite affect on a presentation if not well done and professional.

    Prints on the other hand are not out of the question as long as they are your work and not proprietary or with permission. They should be examples of exotic or extraordinary work. With testing certs would be a plus. But no more than 3-4 examples. Hope this helps.

    Best Regards,
    Bob

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    Photos on the resume? Of yourself, probably not. If you can fit a tasteful picture on there somewhere, perhaps of your work, and it looks good within then entire resume, then sure.

    Absolute "YES" on the portfolio to bring with you on the interview. On thing to note - Try to get pictures of the "process along the way" if you can. I had pictures/screenshots from Autocad showing the assembly I had designed, then machined parts, then the finished assembly. There's more of a story so to speak than just a picture of a random finished product.

    I also made a watermark for my resume one time that received good feedback. I don't remember the exact process, but MS word lets you insert a watermark. I took a "print preview" of my Autocad drawing and used it to create the watermark. It took some time to get right, but it looked cool, and the interviewer took notice, so I guess it was worth it. (Minor detail, probably not worth a ton in the grand scheme of things.)

    The portfolio of your work is definitely worthwhile though.

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