(Apprentice) making the most of my time at an amazing shop - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    Sometimes that isn't possible. Almost 35 years ago I was running Swiss automatics that had all the bells and whistles. The spinning cross drills and back drills put oil in the air and you usually got sprayed doing set-ups. The common oil for running steel at the time and place was something I believe was called Withrow 66. It was a dark sulfur based oil that had a strong odor. My wife at the time insisted after work I enter the house through the garage and leave my work clothes in a sealed metal can and head straight to the shower. Even though at the time we had no children and she had no job she refused to launder my work clothes.

    Yep, Has the same on old Warner and Swasey and B&S in the 80's using Sultex D heavy black sulfur cutting oil. I was using the local laundromat for work clothes but it didn't take long for everyone in town to ban me. My wife went and bought a separate washer and drier just for my work clothes. But that is literally taking your work home. I actually think I miss that smell now.....

  2. #22
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    If it was real you would know.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by g-coder05 View Post
    Sounds like you have all the drive and making of a good machinist. Working or studying the craft after the day job is all good in moderation. Be careful not to burn yourself out too fast. Remember there is a life outside of machining. Having a lathe and a mill in your garage already makes me believe you have your act together so I'm guessing that you may be a family man also? This trade can be overwhelming and consume a lot of your time. Some days just leave work at work Know when to walk away and don't take it out on the misses (its easy to do and you don't realize it).




    Don't kick yourself over a scrapped part. Its just that, a piece of material that started out as a lump and they make more everyday. I bet when you realize you scrapped a part you get that burning sensation that runs up the back of your neck to your ears and cheeks? Let it pass, yes learn from the mistake but don't ever let it bum you out.



    My biggest piece of advice is put a lot of time in on manual machines. There will be stuff that's just not practical to CNC or maybe even not possible and requires the skill of a manual machinist. The tricks that just seem to pop in your head on manual stuff carry over to CNC in many ways, Fixturing and other work holding is a good example. Broaching, Shaping, Gear cutting on a dividing head, surface grinding (Blanchard guys make good money), I could go on and on with the manual stuff but I'm sure you will get it with time.


    Welcome to a new and rewarding life style. Don't plan on getting rich but you will never have to worry about a job.
    Learned pretty quickly that I couldn't keep that up 7 days a week so I'm sticking to an hour or 2 after work and leaving the weekends to do other hobbies. By late Sunday I'm already itching to get back into work. I'm trying to maintain that as long as I can.

    Recently I've been given the odd jobs on the HLV. Usually sinple fixtures and tooling and that takes the cake for me.



    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    If it was real you would know.
    More like a mentorship


    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frater01 View Post
    Bossman has been awesome in terms of having me do pretty much everything I thought I would have to wait years to do. I just started being able to run programs I've made and It seems like he is eager to have me programming more which Is ultimately what I love. Drawing up in cad, programming and actually running the parts as an operator from start to finish.
    If you have found a shop that lets you own your job from start to finish? Keep that job!
    That scenario is becoming more and more rare. But, I believe it is the way it should be.
    At least until you are not learning any more. But, being as that you are two months in? That is years out.

    Otherwise, as has already been stated "be a sponge". And, above all, don't get cocky. Cocky = mistakes or worse.
    One of the biggest time savers I have experienced was learning faster ways to use CAM.
    It seems there are always several ways to skin the same cat in CAM. I often figure out new ways to do things much quicker.
    Then I am left sitting there scratching my head thinking "why didn't I find that a year ago?!"

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  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by g-coder05 View Post
    I actually think I miss that smell now.....
    I am probably the only person on the planet that loves the smell of good used 90wt

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  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelieking71 View Post
    I am probably the only person on the planet that loves the smell of good used 90wt
    As I have grown older smells that didn't use to bother me I find annoying.

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  11. #28
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    sounds like you are enjoying it, thats the best way to get ahead. apprentice or fng (dont understand the snark on that question seen it in multiple posts) with that attitude you will go far.

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  13. #29
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    After ready some of the negative attitudes of the future in the other thread: Where are all the Machinists I have a little spark of hope reading about your atitude and willingness to learn as much as possible. Good luck and keep up the good work

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  15. #30
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    Congratulations on your desire to be a machinist, which leads to being a stickler for details in all aspects of life. So as a stickler for details, how about changing your profile and showing us where you really are, or confirming that you are in the Aland Islands.

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  17. #31
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    Nice to see someone entering the Trade, moving forward with a smile wanting to learn.


    I recently put my mothers best friends grandson start just for the summer. He had taken a couple machining, CAD and welding classes in College and wanted to put some time in. I figured here we go...another engineer wanna be who knows everything.

    Well let me tell you its egg all over my face as I was wrong, kid know alot, asks alot of "good" questions and rarely if ever the same one twice. He is hard working and motivated...wish he was not going back to school in September.


    ANYWAY- to your concerns.

    Try to get familiar with the basic stuff by reading whatever you can. Machinist handbook is a great resource. You do not need to know everything, but page through it...tons of great material. Way to clamp, grab and hold, work strategies.
    Read the tooling catalogs. Some have hints and tips or show ways tools are used differetn then how you may be familiar. Its also great to get a job and have a new tool in mind to get'er done in a better way then done before.
    Read machine manuals- - again you need not know it from cover to cover, but having and idea how a cycle works might give you a better way to program a part. If you have a recollection of that process you can find it in the manual again and really learn it, see if it works like you would like to. Recently I watched a Haas Quick Tip video for deep hole cycles with 1st cut depths followed with reduced depths as hole progresses. Few days later I had a job come up that I thought would benefit from that...sure did, saved 6 minutes per cylce because of it and tooling lasted longer.

    I'll also say, when you think you finally got it and do not need to check your program or work. Stop, be extra careful as chances are that is the time you screwed up and that mistake will cost you.

    People say get over your mistakes, learn and move on... One one hand yes, on the other hand try not to make the mistake in the first place.
    On the third hand, if parts your working on are cheap, sometimes its better to let machine make a few wrong parts then reinging in the tolerances with offsets over working into the tolerances slowly.


    Speeds and feeds, Machinist handbook and the toolmaker/insert company recommendations, take them both and find a happy medium based on cutting tool wear and chips. Chips and worn tooling tells if your too high on you feed or speed, Depth of cut is too heavy. look online for pictures of insert wear...it tells a story and you can dial your tool in by the tool wear. Also do not be afraid to call the tool companies and ask for help...that is what they are there for, use them. It is tough to know the ins and outs of each tool when you deal with so many...the tooling company deals with their one brand and get to play with them for a good long time so they can share that knowledge with their customers AKA- YOU

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  19. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frater01 View Post
    Working on relearning trig. Which is actually satisfying now that I know I will use it everyday.

    One of my main questions is how to actually learn speeds and feeds and getting a good understanding of the limits. This is the biggest wall I've hit so far.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
    -Material, ferrous and non-ferrous, can fall into large groups with a range of speeds (SFPM) for HSS and carbide cutters. Machinery's Handbook has them but there are other sources. That should give you a rough starting place or at least a mental idea of how fast for what. Feeds will depend upon the cutter, direction, machine, and number of cutter flutes. It's a bit more complicated. The suggestion by other members to use info supplied by THAT cutter/insert maker is a good one. Knowing what a good cut looks and sounds like is very telling of cutter/material condition, machine/fixture rigidity, and correct speed/feed/depth of cut (step over too). Nobody expects you to get it all at once, it takes time if you're willing to hang in there through the mistakes we all make. Just make sure to keep yourself safe when (not if) the accident happens. Good luck.

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  21. #33
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    Sounds like you found a good place to "work". This sites sign in program is funky. Please tell us where you are in the world. I assume USA or Canada?
    For some reason new folks get defaulted to the Aland islands. You may have to change it back several times for your location to stick on your postings.
    Bill D

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