Best Mill for a Makerspace - Page 3
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View Poll Results: Which mill should I get for a makerspace?

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22. This poll is closed
  • Get the Haas Mini Mill EDU

    20 90.91%
  • Get the Tormach 1100MX

    2 9.09%
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  1. #41
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    My first concern is that it is going to crashed. Often, very often. Needs to be sort of crash proof or simple to fix.
    Second is a want for some reasonable metal removal rate.
    Add these together and maybe a 10x54 B-port style with cnc control.
    Somewhat robust, decent travels, yet easy to repair and hard to hurt.
    Not high speed and not enclosed and no tool changer perhaps short comings.
    Bob

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by david n View Post
    No, not really.................CAT40 is the most readily available toolholder style out there...............basically the same price or cheaper than BT30...........................
    The tormach is bt30?
    I thought they used a modified R8 and a straight shank 3/4 for the tool holder?
    If it’s not a simple 3/4 shank tool cat40 will defiantly be the most economical and easy to find

  3. #43
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    I was considering doing this (starting a makerspace) when I left the last shop I was running and going out on my own. I ended up buying a product line which is working out very well, but I went through a lot of the thought behind this.

    Here's the thing. If you want an inexpensive older machine that can make good parts and has a decent work envelope, and can probably take a crash and is relatively inexpensive to repair, you're looking at a phase converter and a machine that likely has a FANUC on it. If you want a machine that is very easy for beginners, you're looking at something like a Tormach. There is some gray area in here, but ultimately you're gonna find yourself having to choose between a hobby machine and a real machine. The Haas is more like a real machine that a Tormach, but it comes with a lot of the "real" machine tool control stuff that makes it less hobbyist-friendly.

    Honestly, I'd say you're gonna learn a lot more about CNC machines on an older FANUC that on a Haas or a Tormach. You're going to learn about memory limitations, processing speed, how every machine tool has its own little idiosyncrasies that are just plain dumb, etc. And the more you learn, the better a teacher you will be.

    Between the two, I'd spend the $20k on race car parts instead. No way I will buy a garbage machine like a Haas, but I won't buy a hobby machine like a Tormach, either. I would trust an older Taiwanese or Japanese mill with a FANUC any day over Haas. And I *HATE* FANUC.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Finsta View Post
    I was considering doing this (starting a makerspace) when I left the last shop I was running and going out on my own. I ended up buying a product line which is working out very well, but I went through a lot of the thought behind this.

    Here's the thing. If you want an inexpensive older machine that can make good parts and has a decent work envelope, and can probably take a crash and is relatively inexpensive to repair, you're looking at a phase converter and a machine that likely has a FANUC on it. If you want a machine that is very easy for beginners, you're looking at something like a Tormach. There is some gray area in here, but ultimately you're gonna find yourself having to choose between a hobby machine and a real machine. The Haas is more like a real machine that a Tormach, but it comes with a lot of the "real" machine tool control stuff that makes it less hobbyist-friendly.

    Honestly, I'd say you're gonna learn a lot more about CNC machines on an older FANUC that on a Haas or a Tormach. You're going to learn about memory limitations, processing speed, how every machine tool has its own little idiosyncrasies that are just plain dumb, etc. And the more you learn, the better a teacher you will be.

    Between the two, I'd spend the $20k on race car parts instead. No way I will buy a garbage machine like a Haas, but I won't buy a hobby machine like a Tormach, either. I would trust an older Taiwanese or Japanese mill with a FANUC any day over Haas. And I *HATE* FANUC.
    I know someone with a Sharp 2412 that fits that description very well. You could get the machine, a bunch of tool holders, and a Kurt vise thrown in for less than $20k... And pretty sure you could put a Tormach in that box way Sharp and crush it like a pop can.

    In all seriousness though, I still think the quantity of educational videos on the Haas make it the winner. Unless you're going to have someone on staff that knows FANUC I'd stay away, immediate usability trumps decades long reliability. This is based on the assumption that the limitations are 100% user inexperience, not the actual machine strength.

    One other thought- what ever you do get, go in the parameters and throttle back the rapids to snails pace, like 200 IPM. Should save some crashes and the limit the damage on others.

  5. #45
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    That's funny - I was going to use my SV-2412 for it! I sold that and the Hurco to partially fund the new shop and Okuma tooling, though.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Finsta View Post
    That's funny - I was going to use my SV-2412 for it! I sold that and the Hurco to partially fund the new shop and Okuma tooling, though.
    Thats what I figured... And if you were there to walk a customer/"maker" through how to load programs, set work offsets, tool lengths, etc. it would probably be fine.

    But the OP isn't an experienced machinist, so there's going to be a lot of YouTube tutorials being watched. Which is fine, just stack the deck in your favor with the Haas control.

    Further disclaimer- I haven't owned a Haas in years and am a Brother fan, but handing a Speedio to a first time CNC user isn't going to end well. It will end fast, but not well.

  7. Likes TeachMePlease, Garwood liked this post
  8. #47
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    Awwww, c'mon the rapids switch has a low setting.

  9. #48
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    Haas has a really easy control and great documentation and tutorials compared to almost anything else industrial. That's all that matters to this audience. The speed and accuracy will be much, much better than the dremel and jigsaw they have at home.

    Probably worth seeing if you can turn the Accel/decel and torque limits down too. It will crash, but it doesn't have to do it with gusto.

    4000 rpm is plenty for this. My first cnc mill was 4000 rpm and it didn't have any trouble making things slowly. A mill without a tool changer is half of a mill.

    I'd make sure you have a tool probe, that will save a lot of crashing by itself. A tool probe is cheaper than the first spindle repair.

    A proper cnc Mill in a maker space is a dancing bear. " It doesn't matter if the bear is dancing well. It's damned impressive that he's doing it at all."

    Tormach? No.

  10. #49
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    The TM-0 that Haas is coming out with might be the Goldilocks makerspace machine. Haven't seen the price yet, but it looks like the perfect starter CNC mill.


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